White (slightly stringy) lips on two Boesemani Rainbows

Linkandnavi

New Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
45
Reaction score
8
Location
UK
Hi all,

Two of my Boesemani Rainbows have developed white growths on their upper lips. It appears slightly stringy/cottony. I`m just getting a quarantine tank up to temperature and will transfer them over.

That said, I`ve been looking extensively online and from the descriptions it could either be a fungal infection (which would seem unlikely if two came down simultaneously, as they don't usually spread as such?) or a bacterial infection such as columnaris. Obviously the treatments for the two are very different (the latter being particularly difficult to find anything in the UK for) and I'm not going to just start throwing random things into the tank. Any suggestions gratefully received.

Thanks. (And sorry for the quality of the picture. Every time I try and take one, my angelfish come to the glass seeking attention and block the shot). The picture makes it look like discolouration but when you see them move, it is somewhat "stringy".

Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 5-10
Temp: 25c
Ph: 7


PXL_20210415_125703837.MP.jpg
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
26,236
Reaction score
10,408
Location
Perth, WA
How long have you had the fish for?
Have you added anything to the tank in the last 2 weeks?

----------------------
Rainbowfish have soft mouths and regularly damage them by swimming into the glass and other objects in the tank. This is particularly common on fish that have only been in the tank for a few weeks.

It looks like bruising to the lips.

----------------------
If your rainbowfish ever get sick or look off colour, do the following.
Wipe the inside of the glass down with a clean fish sponge.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week. The water changes and gravel cleaning will reduce the number of disease organisms in the water and provide a cleaner environment for the fish to recover in.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.

Clean the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. However, if the filter is less than 6 weeks old, do not clean it. Wash the filter materials/ media in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Tip the bucket of dirty water on the garden/ lawn. Cleaning the filter means less gunk and cleaner water with fewer pathogens.

Increase surface turbulence/ aeration when using salt or medications because they reduce the dissolved oxygen in the water.

Add some salt, (see directions below).

If there's no improvement after a week with daily water changes and salt, or it gets worse during that time, post more pictures.

----------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), sea salt or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate (4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will affect some plants and some snails. The lower dose rate (1-2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will not affect fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

When you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

----------------------
Thanks. (And sorry for the quality of the picture. Every time I try and take one, my angelfish come to the glass seeking attention and block the shot).
That's called photo bombing :)
 
OP
L

Linkandnavi

New Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
45
Reaction score
8
Location
UK
How long have you had the fish for?
Have you added anything to the tank in the last 2 weeks?

----------------------
Rainbowfish have soft mouths and regularly damage them by swimming into the glass and other objects in the tank. This is particularly common on fish that have only been in the tank for a few weeks.

It looks like bruising to the lips.

----------------------
If your rainbowfish ever get sick or look off colour, do the following.
Wipe the inside of the glass down with a clean fish sponge.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week. The water changes and gravel cleaning will reduce the number of disease organisms in the water and provide a cleaner environment for the fish to recover in.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.

Clean the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. However, if the filter is less than 6 weeks old, do not clean it. Wash the filter materials/ media in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Tip the bucket of dirty water on the garden/ lawn. Cleaning the filter means less gunk and cleaner water with fewer pathogens.

Increase surface turbulence/ aeration when using salt or medications because they reduce the dissolved oxygen in the water.

Add some salt, (see directions below).

If there's no improvement after a week with daily water changes and salt, or it gets worse during that time, post more pictures.

----------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), sea salt or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate (4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will affect some plants and some snails. The lower dose rate (1-2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will not affect fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

When you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

----------------------

That's called photo bombing :)
Thanks Colin and sorry for my delay in responding.

That's reassuring. I've given it a wipe-down and will continue to monitor. Shall (low dose due to shrimp) salt accordingly.

Thanks.
 
OP
L

Linkandnavi

New Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
45
Reaction score
8
Location
UK
How long have you had the fish for?
Have you added anything to the tank in the last 2 weeks?

----------------------
Rainbowfish have soft mouths and regularly damage them by swimming into the glass and other objects in the tank. This is particularly common on fish that have only been in the tank for a few weeks.

It looks like bruising to the lips.

----------------------
If your rainbowfish ever get sick or look off colour, do the following.
Wipe the inside of the glass down with a clean fish sponge.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week. The water changes and gravel cleaning will reduce the number of disease organisms in the water and provide a cleaner environment for the fish to recover in.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.

Clean the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. However, if the filter is less than 6 weeks old, do not clean it. Wash the filter materials/ media in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Tip the bucket of dirty water on the garden/ lawn. Cleaning the filter means less gunk and cleaner water with fewer pathogens.

Increase surface turbulence/ aeration when using salt or medications because they reduce the dissolved oxygen in the water.

Add some salt, (see directions below).

If there's no improvement after a week with daily water changes and salt, or it gets worse during that time, post more pictures.

----------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), sea salt or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate (4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will affect some plants and some snails. The lower dose rate (1-2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will not affect fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

When you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

----------------------

That's called photo bombing :)
And I meant to say, no new additions to the tank in the last couple of weeks. The rainbows have been in there just over four weeks.
 
Top