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Planted 10g Tank

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PygmyMitch

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I thought it was time to make a journal for my 10g tank. I’m planning on changing the look of the tank slightly, as I think it’s currently looking a bit too basic and simple. My plan is to reposition the existing plants, add more plants and add some driftwood.

I have 4 pygmy corys, which I will soon increase to atleast 10 pygmys. I also have 1 otto which I may also add more of (dependent on weather I decided to add another species of fish or not)

My water perimeters are

Ammonia: 0ppm
Nitrite: 0ppm
Nitrate: 5ppm
pH: 6.8
GH: 3dh (53.4ppm)
KH: 1dh (17.8ppm)
Temperature: 24c


562723D7-9107-4D19-8506-A8372689E48C.jpeg
 
Your plan is good, especially for pygmy cories (more driftwood particularly). Floating plants would also be advisable.
Thanks Byron. some floating plants will definitely be added! I did once have floating plants, but because my tank has a lid, I remember the condensation caused the plants to turn black and dye. Any recommendations on a floating plant that wont have this problem ?
 
Thanks Byron. some floating plants will definitely be added! I did once have floating plants, but because my tank has a lid, I remember the condensation caused the plants to turn black and dye. Any recommendations on a floating plant that wont have this problem ?

I am inclined to discount that reason for floating plants that fail. All my tanks have been covered, and all have thick floating plant cover. It is more likely the light (this can sometimes be too intense for plants at the surface) or nutrient availability. Floating plants arte very fast growing, and that means they need more nutrients than slow growers.

Here's the 10g tank that held by group of continuously-spawning pygmy cories.
 

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I am inclined to discount that reason for floating plants that fail. All my tanks have been covered, and all have thick floating plant cover. It is more likely the light (this can sometimes be too intense for plants at the surface) or nutrient availability. Floating plants arte very fast growing, and that means they need more nutrients than slow growers.

Here's the 10g tank that held by group of continuously-spawning pygmy cories.
I believe the floating plant I had was Salvinia Auriculata. I was under the impression these plants didn’t do well with water continuously dripping on top of them. it could possibly be the light then, as my light is approx 1 to 2inch above the water level
 
I believe the floating plant I had was Salvinia Auriculata. I was under the impression these plants didn’t do well with water continuously dripping on top of them. it could possibly be the light then, as my light is approx 1 to 2inch above the water level

I had Salvinia for many years. It went through stages (as many plants do). It did not fare as well as larger substantial floaters like Ceratopteris cornuta which luckily grew like weeds in my tanks, and in my view there is no better floating aquarium plant. It has all the factors that make a great floating plant. Frogbit was another that grew fine but intermittently, but then it turned out to be the temperate species and not the tropical species.

This photo shows the Frogbit with Salvinia mixed in. The flower stalk is Echinodorus major, which is so far as I know from my research the only Echinodorus species that might sometimes produce flowers on the inflorescence and not just adventitious plants when the parent is grown permanently submersed rather than emersed. All the Echinodorus will flower in emersed growth but I've never bothered with that.
 

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I have frogbit or salvinia in all my tanks. These are all covered but do all have gaps to allow for air circulation (usually just leave the feeding hatch open). I do supply liquid nutrients - usually half the recommended dosage for Seachem Comprehensive or TNC Lite. Conversely I have never had any success with any of the Ceratopteris species. In my experience its worth the extra getting tissue cultured floating plants, Tropica 1-2 Grow is readily available in the UK.
 
Red root floater does well in my tanks, both have cover glasses with condensation dripping off them.
Frogbit also did well, I only got rid of it as the roots kept tangling round the plants lower down.
 
I like the look of the Ceratopteris cornuta, I think i might give this one a try. if not maybe the frogbit could be one for me to try
 
Not many places sell C. conuta, most sell C. thalictroides. However there is one seller on eBay here The link includes several plants, you need to scroll down a way to find it.
 
I’ve made this from several smaller pieces of driftwood, with aquarium safe silicone. I’m thinking of putting this centre of the tank, and having plenty of plants surrounding it
 

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