Fishkeeperwales

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Can someone please give me advice for my sterbai corydora please!
I woke up this morning and went to check on my tanks and seen in my tank with corydoras that one was laying on his side still breathing, but breathing slow. When I first researched it I found a lot of forums suggesting nitrate (or possibly nitrite) poisoning and to do either a 50% or full water change. I did a water change keeping approx 40% of the old water and 60% new.
*Due to current circumstances of the outbreak of coronavirus my country is on lockdown and I’m unable to leave to buy a water testing kit so I have no way of giving those details - but I’ve kept fish for years and regularly take water samples to my nearest aquatic shop where they test it for free - to which it’s always been perfect (they don’t give any numbers/etc they show you your results to a colour chart and explain that way).*

Upon doing the water change I could see he really wasn’t doing well in the bucket - my other corydora was fine swimming or laying there, where as he was on his side most of the time (but still breathing slowly and every so often wriggling to turn the right way up). I currently have a separate betta trio tank with only 1 betta in with the same water conditions as the tank he came from - so I put him in there to keep an eye.
Upon further research I seen on here that someone suggested possible symptoms can indicate a bacterial infection - to which if you fill a separate container with tap water of the same temperature (as long as no nitrate or nitrite present - which in my location we do not) - the chlorine will kill the bacteria and to do this for 10-15 minutes. I did this and he seemed to swim up right a little more than what he had been but he was still barely moving. I did this again 30 minutes later and he seemed to swim a lot more! I thought this was a positive step foreword and put him back into his divide in the betta trio tank.

I then read on the same forum where I got the information above that if their stomach is dented in it could be due to internal parasites or a result of not eating - so I put a small bottom feeder pellet by him on the floor to make sure there was also food available. My 1 betta was currently in this divided section and I moved him to a different one prior to adding the corydora so the gravel would possibly have left over food/waste for him to feed on too.

I’ve kept an eye on him all day, sometimes he’s laying the right way up, sometimes he’s on his side but still breathing and wiggling here and there. Sometimes he can turn himself over, sometimes he can’t. He does look a little slimmer than usual but one corydora always used to be smaller than the other anyway so I can’t work out whether it is just the smaller one. Same with colour/paleness - one used to be more pale than the other on purchase.

I purchased him back on the 20th of Feb and they’ve been doing great since I put them in the tank.
Judging by the forums I seen I’m already expecting the worst as I know it’s already not looking hopefully but I was just wondering if anyone could give me anymore information on what it could be or if there is anything to help?? Even a medication?(if he makes it through to the morning)
Also slightly concerned if whatever it is could be contagious to either the other corydora in the original tank or the betta who’s in the trio?
First time keeping corydoras so I’m not sure whether this is common or not.
Sorry I’m advance for not being able to provide water conditions.
I have provided images - some of him on the side, some up right. Please note I have a mix gravel of coconut/white - hence why in some images it looks dirty but it’s not.
Many thanks!
 

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Fishkeeperwales

Fishkeeperwales

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Can someone please give me advice for my sterbai corydora please!
I woke up this morning and went to check on my tanks and seen in my tank with corydoras that one was laying on his side still breathing, but breathing slow. When I first researched it I found a lot of forums suggesting nitrate (or possibly nitrite) poisoning and to do either a 50% or full water change. I did a water change keeping approx 40% of the old water and 60% new.
*Due to current circumstances of the outbreak of coronavirus my country is on lockdown and I’m unable to leave to buy a water testing kit so I have no way of giving those details - but I’ve kept fish for years and regularly take water samples to my nearest aquatic shop where they test it for free - to which it’s always been perfect (they don’t give any numbers/etc they show you your results to a colour chart and explain that way).*

Upon doing the water change I could see he really wasn’t doing well in the bucket - my other corydora was fine swimming or laying there, where as he was on his side most of the time (but still breathing slowly and every so often wriggling to turn the right way up). I currently have a separate betta trio tank with only 1 betta in with the same water conditions as the tank he came from - so I put him in there to keep an eye.
Upon further research I seen on here that someone suggested possible symptoms can indicate a bacterial infection - to which if you fill a separate container with tap water of the same temperature (as long as no nitrate or nitrite present - which in my location we do not) - the chlorine will kill the bacteria and to do this for 10-15 minutes. I did this and he seemed to swim up right a little more than what he had been but he was still barely moving. I did this again 30 minutes later and he seemed to swim a lot more! I thought this was a positive step foreword and put him back into his divide in the betta trio tank.

I then read on the same forum where I got the information above that if their stomach is dented in it could be due to internal parasites or a result of not eating - so I put a small bottom feeder pellet by him on the floor to make sure there was also food available. My 1 betta was currently in this divided section and I moved him to a different one prior to adding the corydora so the gravel would possibly have left over food/waste for him to feed on too.

I’ve kept an eye on him all day, sometimes he’s laying the right way up, sometimes he’s on his side but still breathing and wiggling here and there. Sometimes he can turn himself over, sometimes he can’t. He does look a little slimmer than usual but one corydora always used to be smaller than the other anyway so I can’t work out whether it is just the smaller one. Same with colour/paleness - one used to be more pale than the other on purchase.

I purchased him back on the 20th of Feb and they’ve been doing great since I put them in the tank.
Judging by the forums I seen I’m already expecting the worst as I know it’s already not looking hopefully but I was just wondering if anyone could give me anymore information on what it could be or if there is anything to help?? Even a medication?(if he makes it through to the morning)
Also slightly concerned if whatever it is could be contagious to either the other corydora in the original tank or the betta who’s in the trio?
First time keeping corydoras so I’m not sure whether this is common or not.
Sorry I’m advance for not being able to provide water conditions.
I have provided images - some of him on the side, some up right. Please note I have a mix gravel of coconut/white - hence why in some images it looks dirty but it’s not.
Many thanks!

He unfortunately didn’t make it but I guess I seen it coming. I woke up to him like this, can see he’s changed colours and there looks to be a red lump in him? I’ve attached a photo just incase anyone can point me in the right direction of what this could’ve been.
 

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Aussie_Bristle

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I am so sorry for your loss!! My cory’s are my little babies, so I really feel for you. Someone will be able to help work out what has happened here for you.
All the best
 

Byron

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The immediate issue is now passed, but this will help for the future.

You were right to do an immediate water change; at the first sign of problems like this a substantial water change can help, and sometimes may even solve the issue, depending what it is. However, do not remove the fish from the tank--if I am reading your initial post correctly, you did this. Water changes should be done with the fish in the tank, they will not be as severely stressed as they will being netted into a bucket and then back again. And stress is the root cause of about 95% of all aquarium fish disease issues. Vacuum over the substrate with the water changer if you have one, or just siphon out water and then replace it with conditioned water (water conditioners work instantly).

Diagnosing fish problems is very difficult. When one has experience with the diseases/issues it can be easier to identify a problem, but it is complex. Water changes are harmless. Adding any medication is risky at best, and dangerous at worst.

When a fish dies, my only real concern is whether or not it might be a contagious problem; if it is (which is not in itself simple to determine) then follow-up action may be necessary. But none should be taken, other than water changes and tests, untill it becomes more clearly obvious.

On tests, a simple strip test would be a good idea. Even aside from the present lockdown, it is not always easy to get to a fish store rapidly, and the time to take tests is immediately one spots any abnormality.
 
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Fishkeeperwales

Fishkeeperwales

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The immediate issue is now passed, but this will help for the future.

You were right to do an immediate water change; at the first sign of problems like this a substantial water change can help, and sometimes may even solve the issue, depending what it is. However, do not remove the fish from the tank--if I am reading your initial post correctly, you did this. Water changes should be done with the fish in the tank, they will not be as severely stressed as they will being netted into a bucket and then back again. And stress is the root cause of about 95% of all aquarium fish disease issues. Vacuum over the substrate with the water changer if you have one, or just siphon out water and then replace it with conditioned water (water conditioners work instantly).

Diagnosing fish problems is very difficult. When one has experience with the diseases/issues it can be easier to identify a problem, but it is complex. Water changes are harmless. Adding any medication is risky at best, and dangerous at worst.

When a fish dies, my only real concern is whether or not it might be a contagious problem; if it is (which is not in itself simple to determine) then follow-up action may be necessary. But none should be taken, other than water changes and tests, untill it becomes more clearly obvious.

On tests, a simple strip test would be a good idea. Even aside from the present lockdown, it is not always easy to get to a fish store rapidly, and the time to take tests is immediately one spots any abnormality.
Hi thanks for your comment! I usually keep the fish in the tank when I do a water change as it’s usually only a 10% weekly or 20% every 2 week change, but as I was taking so much out and really wanted to thoroughly clean the gravel (thinking is there’s any gases trapped under neath/read that on a forum too) I thought it would stress them out less putting them in a bucket with their tank water and plants- but it’s good to know going foreword!

I’m only a 5 minute walk from my local pet store and a 10 minute walk from my local aquarium shop which both tests your water for free, hence why I’ve never purchased a water testing kit. But definitely going foreward I’ll be purchasing a kit for emergency’s like this. Not sure how quick the couriers are if I deliver online Atm with everything going on but I’ll look into it.

Thank you again for taking the time to reply!
 

Byron

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Hi thanks for your comment! I usually keep the fish in the tank when I do a water change as it’s usually only a 10% weekly or 20% every 2 week change, but as I was taking so much out and really wanted to thoroughly clean the gravel (thinking is there’s any gases trapped under neath/read that on a forum too) I thought it would stress them out less putting them in a bucket with their tank water and plants- but it’s good to know going foreword!

I’m only a 5 minute walk from my local pet store and a 10 minute walk from my local aquarium shop which both tests your water for free, hence why I’ve never purchased a water testing kit. But definitely going foreward I’ll be purchasing a kit for emergency’s like this. Not sure how quick the couriers are if I deliver online Atm with everything going on but I’ll look into it.

Thank you again for taking the time to reply!

You can use test strips, though some feeel these are less reliable. The API Master Combo liquid test kit has pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and these are the tests you should have on hand.

Regular (once a week) partial water changes should be substantial, no less than half the tank water and preferably a bit more. I change 60-70% of the water in all of my tanks weekly (at one go, not spread out in smaller volume changes which are not as effective). Fresh water never hurt a fish! You can change this with the water changer unit, the fish will move to another area as you do. Work through the tank from one side to the other so it is not as disruptive.
 

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