Stocking A 29 Gallon In A Month And Need Help

KatFishies

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I am purchasing a 29 gallon aquarium soon and will cycle it according to the page that everyone keeps using on this forum. I am trying to figure out the best way to stock the tank though. Here are some of my ideas. Please let me know what you think or if any of these are a horrible idea! 
 
7 neon tetras
7 black neon tetras
6 guppies (4 females, 2 males)         ---> I like guppies and I think they would add color to the aquarium
If not guppies maybe 7 Glow light tetras??      ----> Hesitant because I want some color in the aquarium
3 cories? ----> More?
 
I'm hesitant to add another schooling fish. I don't know if it's more important to add more cories or algae eaters since the aquarium is on the larger side. If so, what algae eaters would you recommend? Skimming through the petsmart ones it seems they get pretty big and I don't know if I want monster algae eaters in the tank.
 
Also, I was wondering what kind of experience any of you have had with dwarf gouramis. I don't trust the sizes they give at Petsmart so was wondering how big they REALLY get. I thought two would be interesting to add for color in the aquarium. I have never kept them and it seems there are differing opinions on them where they can be aggressive and some can be peaceful. 
 
Any advice is definitely welcome. :) I have a while to figure it out so no rush. And I am not going to buy fish online since that is out of my budget so common fish you can buy at your local fish store are better suggestions here. Thanks!
 

fluttermoth

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Do you know the dimensions of the tank and is your local water hard or soft?
 
I wouldn't really like to discuss stocking in any more detail until we know those
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KatFishies

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fluttermoth said:
Do you know the dimensions of the tank and is your local water hard or soft?
 
I wouldn't really like to discuss stocking in any more detail until we know those
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Sorry I totally forgot to add that. That's pretty crucial information. So its 30" L x 12" W x 18" H. My water is pretty hard so I bet the gouramis wouldn't work well. I hear neons can make it in hard water though from other people. What are your opinions? 
 

bluesword23516

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The guppies will definitely breed, but if you just let them breed only a few fry will survive every time.  Neons are pretty hardy, but I have never had hard water. They will probably be ok as long as they acclimate. 
 
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KatFishies

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Well that's good to know they are hardy at least. Any thoughts on harlequin rasboras? 
 

fluttermoth

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I would be hesitant about have any of the neon tetras, if your water is on the hard side. Although they can adapt, it's not ideal.
 
One of the smaller barbs (cherry, five banded) or rainbowfish (threadfin, dwarf neon) would probably do better for you, as a shoaler.
 
Guppies (personally, I'd recommend all males; they do breed worse than rabbits!) or Endlers will be fine.
 
Corydoras need to be in groups of at least six, of the same species, to be happy and show their natural behaviours.
 
Algae eaters can grow large, and they don't really help clean the tank (I'm afraid that's your job!), but if you like them, there are smaller species you could have. The bristlenose is commonly available, and doesn't grow too big.
 
Dwarf gouramis normally get to between two and three inches. They do prefer soft water, but can adapt. They are, however, prone to an incurable disease called 'iridovirus', which does seem to affect a lot of them these days. They could also cause problems with guppies, as they tend to be territorial and occupy the same space (in the upper levels) of the tank.
 
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KatFishies

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fluttermoth said:
I would be hesitant about have any of the neon tetras, if your water is on the hard side. Although they can adapt, it's not ideal.
 
One of the smaller barbs (cherry, five banded) or rainbowfish (threadfin, dwarf neon) would probably do better for you, as a shoaler.
 
Guppies (personally, I'd recommend all males; they do breed worse than rabbits!) or Endlers will be fine.
 
Corydoras need to be in groups of at least six, of the same species, to be happy and show their natural behaviours.
 
Algae eaters can grow large, and they don't really help clean the tank (I'm afraid that's your job!), but if you like them, there are smaller species you could have. The bristlenose is commonly available, and doesn't grow too big.
 
Dwarf gouramis normally get to between two and three inches. They do prefer soft water, but can adapt. They are, however, prone to an incurable disease called 'iridovirus', which does seem to affect a lot of them these days. They could also cause problems with guppies, as they tend to be territorial and occupy the same space (in the upper levels) of the tank.
 
You definitely know your stuff! Well then maybe I will say no to neons (definitely a bummer). Are cardinal tetras better with hard water?
 
Would glow light tetras, black neons, and herlequin rasboras get along ok? only downside to this is not much color. If i have all male guppies won't they kind of stress each other out though? 
 
As far as the gouramis go I guess I will pass on those too if they have that common of a disease and don't want them picking on my beautiful guppies if I have them :)
 
I guess I have a lot of schooling fish ideas but they aren't adding enough color for me. As for the cories I will aim for having 6 then because algae eaters are ugly to me. I like plecos a lot but they seem to become too monsterous for my tank (I had a beatiful large on in the past). 
 
Do cherry barbs lose their color as they grow?
 

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If you want colour, look at male endlers. They are smaller than guppies but have very bright colours. I have just males and although they chase each other, they don't harm each other. A group of them does look stunning. They come in various patterns, look around your local shops.
 
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KatFishies

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essjay said:
If you want colour, look at male endlers. They are smaller than guppies but have very bright colours. I have just males and although they chase each other, they don't harm each other. A group of them does look stunning. They come in various patterns, look around your local shops.
 
I looked up endlers and they look awesome. I hope they have them where I live. Not sure I have seen them here before. I will go look today.
 
As another idea, have any of you ever had female bettas in a community tank? I heard they aren't aggressive, especially in big groups. Any thoughts? Black neons are larger so they could hold their own.
 

brittgs

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I have Cherry Barbs in my 29 gallon tank for almost a year now.  The males are bright red and have not lost color.  I have 6 albino cory cats and 7 harlequin rasbora in the tank as well.
 

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