What's new

Name These Fishes :d

driger8642

Mostly New Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2015
Messages
33
Reaction score
1
Location
US
Got them from Petco, was disappointed that they didnt have my corys :( So my son decided on getting these, the worker said they will fit nicely in the tank and so far they have been peaceful but I totally forgot to get their names.... can someone give me a name for them??
 
1st fish...
 


 
2nd fish...
 


 
 
Thanks Guys :D
 

hudsona85

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2015
Messages
130
Reaction score
9
Location
US
I could be wrong since I don't know much about them but they look really similar to Molly's?
 
OP
driger8642

driger8642

Mostly New Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2015
Messages
33
Reaction score
1
Location
US
for the molly, my neon tetras should be fine with him right?? got 10 neon tetras ans 2 silver ones (mollies as stated) and 2 of the orange ones ( not sure if swordtail sine I see no sword shaped on their tails.
 

NickAu

Member
Tank of the Month!
Joined
Jan 14, 2015
Messages
5,113
Reaction score
1,219
Location
AU
How big is the tank?
 
 
the worker said they will fit nicely in the tank
LOL that's funny, I think he meant to say your money will fit nicely into our cash register.
 
 
for the molly, my neon tetras should be fine with him right?
Mollies prefer hard water while tetras prefer soft.
 
Do you know what your water parameters are? Eg, KH GH PH?
 

DrRob

It's life Jim, but not as we know it.
Retired Moderator
Joined
Sep 22, 2011
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
24
Location
GB
Yeah, a silver molly and a female platy/swordtail. Nick is quite right to check your tank size as mollies are on the larger end of fish that are easy to keep, but need a bigger tank. They can range to brackish, and hard water is really needed for a good, healthy life for them, which your tetras won't be a fan of.
 
Personally I'd be aiming for a 20-30 gallon for mollies, particularly for a female as they tend to run larger at up to 12cm.
 
If that's a platy then they're fine in the smaller tanks, although, with many female livebearers they may already be pregnant when you get them, so you may suddenly find yourself overcrowded with platies. Swordtails are, again, a fair bit larger, and tend to be better in the 30 gallon and above range of tanks.
 

fluttermoth

The current Mrs Treguard ;)
Staff member
Moderator
Global Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2010
Messages
15,752
Reaction score
334
Location
GB
driger8642 said:
for the molly, my neon tetras should be fine with him right?? got 10 neon tetras ans 2 silver ones (mollies as stated) and 2 of the orange ones ( not sure if swordtail sine I see no sword shaped on their tails.
Only male swordtails have a sword, yours are female
They look more like platies to me, but there are very many swordtail/platy hybrids around, so it can be hard to be sure.
 

Byron

Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
12,687
Reaction score
3,348
Location
CA
If I remember the other thread, you have very soft water, around 1 dGH.  These fish are all livebearers and I can assure you they will not be healthy in soft water, as I detailed in the other thread.  The molly will be shimmying, the platy thereafter, and death will follow a protracted period of extreme discomfort for the fish as they slowly succumb.
 
The females may well be impregnated, which will mean several batches of fry should they survive that long and they might, and that is more trouble as you will need to move them out of the tank (no space).
 
Never buy fish on impulse, it is almost always a recipe for failure.  You don't want your son watching his fish suffering and dying.  If the store is responsible at all, they will likely take these back, perhaps as credit for corys.  Patience in this hobby is the only way to success.
 
Byron.
 
OP
driger8642

driger8642

Mostly New Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2015
Messages
33
Reaction score
1
Location
US
Byron said:
If I remember the other thread, you have very soft water, around 1 dGH.  These fish are all livebearers and I can assure you they will not be healthy in soft water, as I detailed in the other thread.  The molly will be shimmying, the platy thereafter, and death will follow a protracted period of extreme discomfort for the fish as they slowly succumb.
 
The females may well be impregnated, which will mean several batches of fry should they survive that long and they might, and that is more trouble as you will need to move them out of the tank (no space).
 
Never buy fish on impulse, it is almost always a recipe for failure.  You don't want your son watching his fish suffering and dying.  If the store is responsible at all, they will likely take these back, perhaps as credit for corys.  Patience in this hobby is the only way to success.
 
Byron.
Yeah you were right, I returned them ( lucky they even took them back ), Gonna get 1-2 gourami ( hope i spelled t right ) instead :D
 
I do wonder, the petco also has the same water as me ( since we both are in ny ), how come they still insist on selling these fishes knowing the water isnt very well suited for them? How do they even manage to have them in their tanks as the water is the same?
 

Byron

Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
12,687
Reaction score
3,348
Location
CA
I do wonder, the petco also has the same water as me ( since we both are in ny ), how come they still insist on selling these fishes knowing the water isnt very well suited for them? How do they even manage to have them in their tanks as the water is the same?
 
 
Several comments on this important issue.  
 
First, I do not know Petco (none in Canada) but from what I've heard from others, I suspect it is much like PetSmart and similar chains.  Which means, the employees usually do not know anything about fish, unfortunately; now there may be exceptions, but I have been in PetSmart and similar stores enough to know that most staff are not hobbyists and thus not knowledgeable in fish.  I will never buy fish from these chains, due to serious inherent disease problems; fortunately I have a couple of good locally-owned stores and one importer, and I've never had problems with fish from these.  I was lucky when I entered the hobby seriously (in the 1980's) to have a hobbyist owned and staffed store, and they taught me a great deal.  I have since done extensive research.  One never stops learning.  It is a lesson well learned, to always research a fish species before acquiring it; ask on forums like this one, check reliable sites (like Seriously Fish), and know what the fish requires and how it is expected to behave.
 
Second, on the store fish/water point.  Some stores will set up a bank of tanks with specific water.  I have one here that does this, for livebearers.  But many like the chains do not intend the fish to be with them for long, and if the fish lives long enough to be sold, that is the end of their concern.  And fish can "manage" for a period, which varies depending upon the species and the parameters involved.
 
This brings me to the reason that water parameters are so important.  Freshwater fish have evolved to function best in very specific parameters.  Fish are more closely tied to their aquatic environment than almost any terrestrial animal.  The fish's physiology means that the water in which they live is brought directly into their bloodstream and internal organs quite unlike anything terrestrial animals must contend with.  When this water varies from what the fish was "built" to live in, it causes serious problems for the fish, from stress which weakens the immune system very rapidly, to far more serious issues involving the functioning of organs and systems.  The fish can sometimes tolerate this for a time, before it becomes exhausted and just dies, or succumbs to various diseases which it can no longer fight off naturally.  The second problem is that even if the fish survives and is then placed in a more suitable environment, the internal damage that has been done is usually sever enough to be irreversible.  A shorter lifespan always results, and more frequent health problems along the way.  Aggression usually increases, as this is about the only way the fish has to fight frustration.
 
Let me end with a simple example.  We had an exceptionally dry and warmer than normal summer this year; the heat began in May and continued to late August, well above normal; temperatures in June for example were a full 10 degrees C above the normal for the month.  We humans, along with the land animals, managed with few issues.  But the fish did not; there have been reports of a serious decline in salmon stocks this year, solely due to the slightly warmer water in the ocean.  The fish simply cannot adjust to such things.  And it doesn't take much.
 
Byron.
 

trending

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Top