Help me Gender my Cory Cats!

BettaChel

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Hello all! I’m relatively new to fish keeping but I love it so much! I got some new corys yesterday and I was wondering if anyone could help to identify their sexes if possible!
291921F5-DBDE-47B2-81ED-0804E9B700A6.jpeg

Here are the two Juliis. I think the one in the back is female and the one in front male? (guessing! lol)
93BEE867-078F-47BD-8DBE-ACB833DFB6A8.jpeg

Here’s one of the Albinos! I wanna say this one is female, while my other is male but again, just guessing based on size :0!!
6A60102B-D9F5-46CC-9C80-C1651068094C.jpeg

Here’s the two Albinos!

So yeah! Any help would be appreciated. If more pics are required just let me know!!

Also bonus: I’m pretty sure my betta thinks he’s one of them...
749A809E-04E1-41AA-8C61-053C158BA32D.jpeg

He keeps wanting to school with them I think (he doesn’t attack or bite, I keep a close eye on him, he just seems curious!) and sometimes one of the Juliis will follow him around. It’s kind of cute.
 

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Byron

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Keep a very close eye on the Betta, this may well be the beginning of trouble. The fact you do not see it does not mean it is not there; fish have chemical signals announcing their aggression, etc, long before any physical interaction might (or might not) occur.

To the question of gender, this is not easy with most Corydoras as they have no external gender differences except for a couple of species (not these, though I cannot remember which at the moment). However, females will always be rounder when viewed from above, and males slimmer. This will be easier to see when the fish are more settled, and as they grow/age.

The spotted cories are Corydoras trilineatus, and the albinos likely C. aeneus or C. paleatus, both of these (and some other species) have an albino form.
 

essjay

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Apart from when you see them spawning, the only way to tell is by looking at them from above. Females are fatter than males. But this is not a very accurate way to tell the difference as an under nourished female will be thin and a bloated male will be fat.
 

FishBearer9845

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@Byron Sorry to hijack the thread, I've been looking at a Betta/Cory tank but from what you've said, am I gathering that's really not a good idea? So Betta on it's own? (I've read in lots of places both options)
Thank you
 

LostBear

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Hello all! I’m relatively new to fish keeping but I love it so much! I got some new corys yesterday and I was wondering if anyone could help to identify their sexes if possible!
View attachment 97414
Here are the two Juliis. I think the one in the back is female and the one in front male? (guessing! lol)
View attachment 97415
Here’s one of the Albinos! I wanna say this one is female, while my other is male but again, just guessing based on size :0!!
View attachment 97417
Here’s the two Albinos!

So yeah! Any help would be appreciated. If more pics are required just let me know!!

Also bonus: I’m pretty sure my betta thinks he’s one of them...
View attachment 97418
He keeps wanting to school with them I think (he doesn’t attack or bite, I keep a close eye on him, he just seems curious!) and sometimes one of the Juliis will follow him around. It’s kind of cute.
I think your betta is more likely to be spoiling for a fight than looking for company.

How big is your tank?

Light-coloured substrate can be stressful for fish, too, as it makes them feel exposed and vulnerable.
 

Byron

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@Byron Sorry to hijack the thread, I've been looking at a Betta/Cory tank but from what you've said, am I gathering that's really not a good idea? So Betta on it's own? (I've read in lots of places both options)
Thank you
Much of the "information" on the internet respecting fish and this hobby is misleading at best, and too often false. Regarding bettas, they are not community fish and for an explanation I will copy what I posted in length in another thread a while back.

Betta splendens is a solitary fish

Betta splendens seems to live solitary in its natural habitat which is still and sluggish waters, including rice paddies, swamps, roadside ditches, streams and ponds. Such an environment is not conducive to fish that require oxygenated waters so one can expect few if any non-anabantid species to live in such habitats. During the dry season, most Bettas are able to bury themselves in the bottom of their dried up habitat. There, they can live in moist cavities until water once again fills the depression during a rainy period. The fish can survive even if thick, clay mud is all that is left of the water. They do not survive total drying out of the bottom. (Vierke 1988) There are very few fish species, and none that are found in the same habitats, that can manage life in such conditions, which is further evidence that the B. splendens is most likely a solitary species.

All anabantids are territorial; male bettas instinctively fight each other in defending their territory. Selective breeding over many years has produced fish with a heightened sense of territory defense, which explains the common name of Siamese Fighting Fish. Fish fights for money is a "sport," if you want to use the term for such animal cruelty. This means the Bettas we see in stores have an even greater propensity to literally kill each other given the chance. For a fish that instinctively lives alone, and believes it must defend its territory to survive--both traits that are programmed into the species' DNA--this aggressiveness is likely to extend to any fish that dares enter the Betta's territory, which in most cases will be the tank space. And forcing the fish to "live" under such conditions is frankly cruel and inhumane.

Individual fish within a species do not always adhere to the "norm" for the species; this is true of all animals, including humans. But with fish, responsible aquarists should research the fish's behaviours, traits, and requirements, and then aim to provide accordingly. "Expectations" are as I said above programmed into the DNA, and we are not going to change them just because we may want to have a Betta in the tank with "x" fish species. Sometimes the Betta seems to co-operate with our experiment, but in many of these situations it may not last for long, eventually if not immediately. Fish that do succumb are likely being severely stressed, unseen to the aquarist until it is too late.

If the Betta does not first attack the intruders, the intruders may go after the Betta. It is a two-way street, and in either situation it is the Betta that loses in the end. Severe stress causing increased aggression, or conversely severe withdrawal from being targeted by the other fish. And physical aggression is not the only concern; fish release pheromones and allomones, chemical communication signals that other fish read, and these can promote aggression that will in time weaken the fish to the point of death. There is no reason to risk the fish in one's attempt to prove science wrong.
 

LostBear

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Much of the "information" on the internet respecting fish and this hobby is misleading at best, and too often false. Regarding bettas, they are not community fish and for an explanation I will copy what I posted in length in another thread a while back.

Betta splendens is a solitary fish

Betta splendens seems to live solitary in its natural habitat which is still and sluggish waters, including rice paddies, swamps, roadside ditches, streams and ponds. Such an environment is not conducive to fish that require oxygenated waters so one can expect few if any non-anabantid species to live in such habitats. During the dry season, most Bettas are able to bury themselves in the bottom of their dried up habitat. There, they can live in moist cavities until water once again fills the depression during a rainy period. The fish can survive even if thick, clay mud is all that is left of the water. They do not survive total drying out of the bottom. (Vierke 1988) There are very few fish species, and none that are found in the same habitats, that can manage life in such conditions, which is further evidence that the B. splendens is most likely a solitary species.

All anabantids are territorial; male bettas instinctively fight each other in defending their territory. Selective breeding over many years has produced fish with a heightened sense of territory defense, which explains the common name of Siamese Fighting Fish. Fish fights for money is a "sport," if you want to use the term for such animal cruelty. This means the Bettas we see in stores have an even greater propensity to literally kill each other given the chance. For a fish that instinctively lives alone, and believes it must defend its territory to survive--both traits that are programmed into the species' DNA--this aggressiveness is likely to extend to any fish that dares enter the Betta's territory, which in most cases will be the tank space. And forcing the fish to "live" under such conditions is frankly cruel and inhumane.

Individual fish within a species do not always adhere to the "norm" for the species; this is true of all animals, including humans. But with fish, responsible aquarists should research the fish's behaviours, traits, and requirements, and then aim to provide accordingly. "Expectations" are as I said above programmed into the DNA, and we are not going to change them just because we may want to have a Betta in the tank with "x" fish species. Sometimes the Betta seems to co-operate with our experiment, but in many of these situations it may not last for long, eventually if not immediately. Fish that do succumb are likely being severely stressed, unseen to the aquarist until it is too late.

If the Betta does not first attack the intruders, the intruders may go after the Betta. It is a two-way street, and in either situation it is the Betta that loses in the end. Severe stress causing increased aggression, or conversely severe withdrawal from being targeted by the other fish. And physical aggression is not the only concern; fish release pheromones and allomones, chemical communication signals that other fish read, and these can promote aggression that will in time weaken the fish to the point of death. There is no reason to risk the fish in one's attempt to prove science wrong.
Thank you for this, Byron - I really enjoyed reading it. Interesting and informative. Good stuff.
 

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