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A Little Video Of The 900 Gallon

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CFC

CFC

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:lol: you should bring her here for a visit, after seeing the 2000 odd gallons of water i have in tanks she'll think that letting you have a bigger tank is nothing.
 

kyle sicard

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It all depends on the foot print, a lot of big tanks tend to just be tall with no extra depth.

You know these are freshwater stingrays right ?
I do understand that the tank is freshwater but salt stingrays are in similar size or at least the stingray i plan to get. And my tank is being custom made and the tank is 32 inches wide almost 3 feet. and it's 6 feet long would that size be good enough for a stingray and btw the back wall will be covered with rock

It all depends on the foot print, a lot of big tanks tend to just be tall with no extra depth.

You know these are freshwater stingrays right ?
I do understand that the tank is freshwater but salt stingrays are in similar size or at least the stingray i plan to get. And my tank is being custom made and the tank is 32 inches wide almost 3 feet. and it's 6 feet long would that size be good enough for a stingray and btw the back wall will be covered with rock
The tank is being made and when it arrives i'll post pics of it and then post pics of it when it has rocks to show you the size of it.
 

andywg

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It all depends on the foot print, a lot of big tanks tend to just be tall with no extra depth.

You know these are freshwater stingrays right ?
I do understand that the tank is freshwater but salt stingrays are in similar size or at least the stingray i plan to get. And my tank is being custom made and the tank is 32 inches wide almost 3 feet. and it's 6 feet long would that size be good enough for a stingray and btw the back wall will be covered with rock

The tank is being made and when it arrives i'll post pics of it and then post pics of it when it has rocks to show you the size of it.
Just how much research exactly have you done on SW stingrays? Which ray are you looking at getting?

The most common one (the Blue Spotted Ribbontail) has a very poor history in aquaria with only one in 10 living more thana year in captivity (and yes, that figure includes public aquaria trying to keep them as well). As a result of this one really has to look into other rays, but therein one comes across dietry problems as a number of rays eat worms and such from the sand, so getting them onto prepared food, or even live shrimp becomes a task.

If you really are serious about wanting a SW stingray then your best starting point will be to buy Aquarium Sharks and Rays by Scott W. Michael. Some of the sizes he gives are a little small, but he does give very good info on setting up a tank for Elasmobranches and on how to look after them.
 

kyle sicard

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It all depends on the foot print, a lot of big tanks tend to just be tall with no extra depth.

You know these are freshwater stingrays right ?
I do understand that the tank is freshwater but salt stingrays are in similar size or at least the stingray i plan to get. And my tank is being custom made and the tank is 32 inches wide almost 3 feet. and it's 6 feet long would that size be good enough for a stingray and btw the back wall will be covered with rock

The tank is being made and when it arrives i'll post pics of it and then post pics of it when it has rocks to show you the size of it.
Just how much research exactly have you done on SW stingrays? Which ray are you looking at getting?

The most common one (the Blue Spotted Ribbontail) has a very poor history in aquaria with only one in 10 living more thana year in captivity (and yes, that figure includes public aquaria trying to keep them as well). As a result of this one really has to look into other rays, but therein one comes across dietry problems as a number of rays eat worms and such from the sand, so getting them onto prepared food, or even live shrimp becomes a task.

If you really are serious about wanting a SW stingray then your best starting point will be to buy Aquarium Sharks and Rays by Scott W. Michael. Some of the sizes he gives are a little small, but he does give very good info on setting up a tank for Elasmobranches and on how to look after them.
I was looking in to getting a blue spotted stingray or a california sting ray, and is there a website that scott w. micheal has that i can look at?
 

andywg

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I was looking in to getting a blue spotted stingray or a california sting ray, and is there a website that scott w. micheal has that i can look at?
There isn't a website that has all the info from the book. It would be pointless him doing that as his book would not then sell.

If you seriously want to keep SW rays you really need to get a copy of that book.

For example, which blue spotted ray would it be? Most common is the ribbontail (Taeniura lymma)rather than the less attractive but more hardy blue spotted ray (Dasyatis kuhlii). Knowing this will depend on how you look after the fish.

D. khulii grows to a maximum total length of 26" including the tail with T. lymma hitting around 27", so a 30" tank front to back could potentially cause issues later in life.

The California Stingray (or Round Stingray - Urobatis halleri) is a better candidate as it has a maximum length of around 21-22", though this ray does prefer cooler water with best results from keeping it in 12 to 22 degrees C.
 
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