DarkAngel394

New Member
Joined
May 16, 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Australia
Hi All,

I'm thinking of getting the aquastyle 620 tank dimensions are 62cm W x 52cm H x 39cm D. It says the capacity is 90L but when I put it in to Aq advisor it says it's 120L and I'm mega confused. Would this stocking work? My tap water GH is 1-2 and PH is 7.56 - 8.01

2 Dwarf Gourami
6 Green neon tetra
6 ember tetra
4 corydoras
3 Cherry Shrimp

Open to any suggestions
 

Slaphppy7

Mod Squaderator
Staff member
Global Moderator ⚒️
Joined
Jan 20, 2021
Messages
7,703
Reaction score
6,569
Location
SE Texas
 

Essjay

Moderator
Staff member
Global Moderator ⚒️
Joined
Nov 28, 2006
Messages
18,376
Reaction score
15,198
Location
Teesside, UK
The height quoted includes the lid. So the volume using the dimensions on AquaOne's website is more than the tank can actually hold. The volume given by AquaOne (90 litres) is the amount of space occupied by just the tank without the lid. Their volume of 90 litres is likely to be the total volume of the tank not the amount of water it can hold - it probably includes the air gap we have to leave between the water and the rim. So the amount of water it can hold will be less than 90 litres.

When using aqadvisor, you need to use the height of the water from the top of the substrate to the water surface.




As for stocking:
Dwarf gouramis are usually infected with a couple of incurable diseases by the time they arrive at the shop. Unless you can find a breeder, I would avoid these fish. Honey gouramis are usually disease free.
Green neon and ember tetras are OK provided you have soft water. And I would get more of them as they do better in bigger shoals.
Cories need at at least 6 and sand on the bottom of the tank. The three dwarf species (Corydoras pygmaeus, C. habrosus and C. hastatus) need a group of at least 10.
Cherry shrimps will be fine with these fish - if you have at least one male and one female you will soon have more than 3.

All this assumes you have soft water. if you have hard water, I would not keep any of these fish though. Do you know how hard your water is? Your water provider's website should have this info somewhere.
 
OP
OP
D

DarkAngel394

New Member
Joined
May 16, 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Australia
The height quoted includes the lid. So the volume using the dimensions on AquaOne's website is more than the tank can actually hold. The volume given by AquaOne (90 litres) is the amount of space occupied by just the tank without the lid. Their volume of 90 litres is likely to be the total volume of the tank not the amount of water it can hold - it probably includes the air gap we have to leave between the water and the rim. So the amount of water it can hold will be less than 90 litres.

When using aqadvisor, you need to use the height of the water from the top of the substrate to the water surface.




As for stocking:
Dwarf gouramis are usually infected with a couple of incurable diseases by the time they arrive at the shop. Unless you can find a breeder, I would avoid these fish. Honey gouramis are usually disease free.
Green neon and ember tetras are OK provided you have soft water. And I would get more of them as they do better in bigger shoals.
Cories need at at least 6 and sand on the bottom of the tank. The three dwarf species (Corydoras pygmaeus, C. habrosus and C. hastatus) need a group of at least 10.
Cherry shrimps will be fine with these fish - if you have at least one male and one female you will soon have more than 3.

All this assumes you have soft water. if you have hard water, I would not keep any of these fish though. Do you know how hard your water is? Your water provider's website should have this info somewhere.
Thanks so much for that advice! my tap water is very soft at 33-51 CACO3/L/ppm
 

Essjay

Moderator
Staff member
Global Moderator ⚒️
Joined
Nov 28, 2006
Messages
18,376
Reaction score
15,198
Location
Teesside, UK
With water that soft, all the fish on your list are suitable :) The only possible problem would be shrimps. They do need calcium in the water for their exoskeletons. You could maybe try three and see how they get on, but don't be surprised if they don't do well.

The alternative would be to increase the GH slightly to suit the shrimps, but not too high for the fish. I know members in the UK use Salty Shrimp to slightly increase GH, but I don't know if that's available in Australia, or any other product that would do the same.
 

Avel1896

Fish Gatherer
Joined
Jan 5, 2021
Messages
2,060
Reaction score
974
Location
Nice
It is 126 litre, gross volume.
Once you remove glass thickness it is 118 litre, net volume.
Once you remove occupied volume by plant/substrate/filter/rocs it's around 88 litre, real volume.
 

Essjay

Moderator
Staff member
Global Moderator ⚒️
Joined
Nov 28, 2006
Messages
18,376
Reaction score
15,198
Location
Teesside, UK
The height quoted by AquaOne's website, 52 cm height, is from the bottom of the tank to the top of the lid - the lid is raised above the tank walls, so the quoted height is more than just the tank.
Image from https://aquaone.com.au
aquastyle620-measurment.jpg

To work out the volume, the lid should not be included.

AquaOne say its capacity is 90 litres.
 

Byron

Supporting Member
Tank of the Month!
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
19,156
Reaction score
11,050
Location
CA
Back to the initial question, now the tank size is sorted and the water parameters known, and picking up on essjay's post...increase the shoaling species. All tetras and cories are shoaling fish, so the more of the species there are, the better they will fare. The species mentioned are also relatively quiet fish, thinking of the swimming activity level, and such fish need less swimming space so they are good choices for tanks like this one that has the volume but not the length.

The cory species is not indicated, but this would be a good tank for one of the "dwarf" species, in a group of 12-15. Corydoras pygmaeus, C. hastatus or C. habrosus.

The Ember Tetras (Hyphessobrycon amandae) and Green/False Neons (Paracheirodon simulans) should be in groups of 9-12 each. The latter is a delicate fish and larger numbers always improve their chances.

I agree to leave out the Dwarf Gourami. One gourami that would do well is the pygmy or sparkling gourami, Trichopsis pumila, in a group of five I would suggest. This will likely ensure males and females, and males have very interesting interactive "croaking" behaviours.

The shrimp I will leave to the shrimp experts, other than saying there are some species suited to soft water now, no idea which though.
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
36,203
Reaction score
20,669
Location
Perth, WA
To work out the volume of water in the tank:
measure length x width x height in cm.
divide by 1000.
= volume in litres.

If you have big rocks or driftwood in the tank, remove these so you get a more accurate water volume.

When you measure the height, measure from the top of the substrate to the top of the water level.
You can use a permanent marker to draw a line on the tank at the water level and put down how many litres are in the tank at that level.

There is a calculator/ converter in the "FishForum.net Calculator" under "Useful Links" at the bottom of this page that will let you convert litres to gallons if you need it.
 

Most reactions

trending

Staff online

  • Chad
    Reef Tank, Crustacean, and Puffer Enthusiast
  • Fishmanic
    King of the Jungle
Top