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Suthypie

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Hi fish folk!

I’m now setting up my 200 litre aquarium. And I’m very much looking forward to getting two different pairs of gouramis.

Firstly; I’m wanting to get some ‘peaceful or more docile gouramis’ perhaps a couple of honey gouramis and opalines? Would this be ok?

And secondly; I have 3 blind cave fish. Which I’m slightly uneasy about putting the gouramis in with. Sure, it’s not an angel fish or a guppy. But would the gouramis be safe with these??? Mixed responses on other websites :(

Thanks guys :)
 
I would not mix blue/ opaline gouramis with Honey dwarf gouramis because the blue will kick hell out of the honey dwarfs.

Pearl gouramis are big and relatively peaceful, Betta pugnax are a labyrinth and grow to about 4 inches and are a different colour to pearl gouramis, they are also quite peaceful.

Blind cave tetras can be fin nippers and are best in a tank of their own or with fish that have short fins. They should also be kept in groups of 10 or more to encourage natural behaviour and to reduce their fin nipping :)
 
I would not mix blue/ opaline gouramis with Honey dwarf gouramis because the blue will kick hell out of the honey dwarfs.

Pearl gouramis are big and relatively peaceful, Betta pugnax are a labyrinth and grow to about 4 inches and are a different colour to pearl gouramis, they are also quite peaceful.

Blind cave tetras can be fin nippers and are best in a tank of their own or with fish that have short fins. They should also be kept in groups of 10 or more to encourage natural behaviour and to reduce their fin nipping :)

Got it thanks! I definitely want the Honey Gouramis, so Blue gouramis are out :(

The blind cave fish were given to me by a friend, but have had them for so long and has stopped me from getting some other species I really wanted. I might have to take them to an aquarium shop and be rid of them :(
 
I have 3 blind cave fish. Which I’m slightly uneasy about putting the gouramis in with.

I hear that blind cave fish will nip at anything they bump into. Fish, plants, doesn't matter. I don't keep them myself so I can't confirm, but that is what I hear.
 
In most cases, especially with the medium and larger gourami species, two or more species should not be combined. Males are territorial to varying degrees depending upon the species and individuals, and this goes cross-species. As has been mentioned, the opaline is one of the most aggressive/territorial of the medium gourami; the varieties blue, gold, cosby, opaline, 3-spot, marble and perhaps a few others are all derived from the natural species Trichopodus trichopterus and this feisty nature is standard. Other members have reported even females of these killing non-gourami tankmates.

The Pearl Gourami also mentioned is ideal; a group of two males and three or four females would be very lovely. And its incredible beauty is such that it really does not need competition; and given its size, there really would not be room for similar fish inb a 200 liter (50 gallon) tank. Many of the rasbora make good tankmates, the species in Trigonostigma especially the T. hengeli or T. espei, and some of the smaller peaceful tetras will work. Always avoid all barbs and danios with gourami as these are too active.

Which is one of the issues with the blind cave tetra, along with its nipping tendency. This species is best on its own, in a suitably-aquascaped aquarium which can be very effective.

Floating plants are mandatory with gourami, and not strong water movement.
 
In most cases, especially with the medium and larger gourami species, two or more species should not be combined. Males are territorial to varying degrees depending upon the species and individuals, and this goes cross-species. As has been mentioned, the opaline is one of the most aggressive/territorial of the medium gourami; the varieties blue, gold, cosby, opaline, 3-spot, marble and perhaps a few others are all derived from the natural species Trichopodus trichopterus and this feisty nature is standard. Other members have reported even females of these killing non-gourami tankmates.

The Pearl Gourami also mentioned is ideal; a group of two males and three or four females would be very lovely. And its incredible beauty is such that it really does not need competition; and given its size, there really would not be room for similar fish inb a 200 liter (50 gallon) tank. Many of the rasbora make good tankmates, the species in Trigonostigma especially the T. hengeli or T. espei, and some of the smaller peaceful tetras will work. Always avoid all barbs and danios with gourami as these are too active.

Which is one of the issues with the blind cave tetra, along with its nipping tendency. This species is best on its own, in a suitably-aquascaped aquarium which can be very effective.

Floating plants are mandatory with gourami, and not strong water movement.

Thanks so much for the above advice. It seems I have some thinking to do

Can I ask:

If I were to choose just one breed/type of gourami, whether it’s the opaline, pearl or honey; would a 1 male to 3 female ratio be a safe or good option? Or does it again depend on the specific breed?

:)
 
Thanks so much for the above advice. It seems I have some thinking to do

Can I ask:

If I were to choose just one breed/type of gourami, whether it’s the opaline, pearl or honey; would a 1 male to 3 female ratio be a safe or good option? Or does it again depend on the specific breed?

:)

Generally you want two females to one male (nothing wrong with three females to one male) for most species. Pearls and Honeys are relatively peaceful so small groups can be more interesting, but still more females to males. The opaline is a species that can become a terror to each other and other fish. If you have backup plans fine, but if not, I wold not consider this species. Back-up plans means what you might do if one or more of the gourami became killers.

Having lotys of cover for the females is also helpful, meaning lots of plants. And spacious tank to begin with. The Pearls or Honeys should manage here, the opaline in my view wold not.
 
Generally you want two females to one male (nothing wrong with three females to one male) for most species. Pearls and Honeys are relatively peaceful so small groups can be more interesting, but still more females to males. The opaline is a species that can become a terror to each other and other fish. If you have backup plans fine, but if not, I wold not consider this species. Back-up plans means what you might do if one or more of the gourami became killers.

Having lotys of cover for the females is also helpful, meaning lots of plants. And spacious tank to begin with. The Pearls or Honeys should manage here, the opaline in my view wold not.

Thanks Byron. You may have saved me a lot of trouble there. It will either be the Honey or Pearl for me then, with more females in the group. I’m planning on having a relatively heavy planted tank with a large piece of bogwood. Space won’t be an issue either :) :) :)
 

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