Fish Quiz

eaglesaquarium

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the_lock_man said:
He didn't, because they aren't recommended for most tanks.
 
That is correct, I stick to recommended Earth species only.
 
 
Question:  Why are South American cichlids incompatible with African cichlids?
 

sawickib

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South american cichlids are usually smaller but can also but bigger and are also more timid and less aggressive.
 

eaglesaquarium

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sawickib said:
South american cichlids are usually smaller but can also but bigger and are also more timid and less aggressive.
 
Incorrect.  Behavior is actually not the biggest concern.
 

attibones

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PH and water hardness conflict, correct? South American cichlids typically like softer water towards the 6-ish pH and Africans like it just about the opposite.
 

CSnyder00

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Much better attibones. Water parameters and needs are much different. Most rift lake cichlids need a more basic pH (that is 7.1 - 8.8 for all of the acid chart newbies). They also need warmer water around 78-82 degrees F. South Americans are good for a more neutral pH (thats 6.6 - 7.4) and a temperature that is cooler around 74-78 degrees. They technically could survive together if you shoot the gap, but will likely not thrive together due to temperment and different dietary needs.
 
That's a bit more on point, sir from Philly.
 
I didn't go to any websites for that answer either. That all came from right up here (points to head...). Way too much fishy knowledge floating around in there...
 

eaglesaquarium

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The first with the correct answer was attibones.
 
CSnyder's answer was more complete, although both forgot to mention water hardness.  South American cichlids require soft to extremely soft water conditions, while the Africans need hard water.
 

TwoTankAmin

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CSnyder's answer was also partially incorrect. Check out water temps for many SA species.  I had a heater failure a few years back- the tank went over 104F (40C). It did kill the discus and the tetras, but 8 L450 plecos survived those temps and went on to breed (I just moved 26 of them into a new tank some 2+ years later). I have also treated sick discus at just over 90F (32+C) and they recovered fine. But given the range that covers SA fish habitats- it would not be reasonable to state they are in warmer or cooler waters. Climates varies widely in SA.
 
And re Africans, they need hard water more than higher pH.
 
More interesting is the fact that in the last 100 years surface temps in Lake Tanganyika have increased:
 
People in the four countries bordering Lake Tanganyika rely heavily on fishing for both food and income. Some 1 million people earn their livelihood by fishing,3,4 and lake fish account for 25 to 40 percent of the animal protein supply for people living nearby.2 As a result of warming temperatures over the last century, biological activity in the lake has declined, threatening the sustainability of Lake Tanganyika's fishing industry.
  • Since 1913, the surface waters of Lake Tanganyika have warmed by 1.6 to 2.3° F (0.9 to 1.3° C).5,6
  • Rising temperatures are associated with a decrease in primary productivity—life activity at the base of the food chain—of 20 percent or more.5,9,10,11
  • Given a mid–level scenario for future emissions of heat–trapping gases—primarily from the burning of coal, oil, gas, and trees—East Africa could warm by 5.4 to 6.3° F (3.0 to 3.5° C) by the end of this century, causing further declines in Lake Tanganyika's ecosystems.15,16
from http://www.climatehotmap.org/global-warming-locations/lake-tanganyika-tanzania-africa.html
 

CSnyder00

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True that harder/softer water is a better answer. To that point, though, I've had rare African Mbuna breed in softer water and have had my SA's breeding in what would be considered hard water. There are a lot of things that are different about their home habitats. Also keep in mind that wild caught species would be more picky when it comes to water parameters than a tank bred generation.
 
Let's just call the answer different water parameters and different temperments. And yes, I was the second to answer. Take it away attibones!
 

attibones

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Oh fun. Let's see.

The dwarf puffer has something of a beak which enables it to break through snail shells and shrimp exos rather easily. How many teeth form this beak?
 

attibones

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Four is indeed correct. Malfunction answered first with the right answer, but you are also correct, Ch4rlie. The teeth are fused. Thanks for that link, too; I'll enjoy reading it.

Malfunction, take it away with another question.
 

malfunction

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Ok, over to me...

Why is leaving water out to "age" ineffective as a standalone measure if your water supplier uses chloramine?
 

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