First live plant...

jaylach

Supporting Member
Pet of the Month!
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
1,165
Reaction score
1,062
Location
Somewhere in space... Wyoming for mail.
Well, mayhaps not my first but the first in many, many, years...

If it actually lives I will continue to replace my fake stuff with live. One reason is that I'm finding it impossible to get my ammonia down to zero and live plants can help with that. Ammonia refuses to go below 0.25 PPM. Another reason is that live plants give a more natural ecology.

Anyway, I was at my local Petco and the thing caught my eye but was not labeled and I have no idea as to what it is. It came growing out of a rock. Can anyone identify? Also sort of interested in what the rock might be. The white on the left is part of the rock.

IMG_2296.JPG
 
OP
OP
jaylach

jaylach

Supporting Member
Pet of the Month!
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
1,165
Reaction score
1,062
Location
Somewhere in space... Wyoming for mail.
the plant is Anubias and it's a slow growing low light plant.
Thanks. :)

Since you say low light I'll move it to a fairly shaded area of the tank.

As far as other beginner plants I'm looking at Marimo Moss Balls. From what I've read the biggest maintenance is to roll them around when vacuuming to not have the bottoms die from a lack of light. Would this be a good choice for a plant beginner?

Amazon Sword looks interesting but seems that they can take over a tank so don't know if they would be proper for a 20 gallon cube. I would guess they can be trimmed to control?

Since I've never done a lot of live plants I want to start with easy stuff and go gradually.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
jaylach

jaylach

Supporting Member
Pet of the Month!
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
1,165
Reaction score
1,062
Location
Somewhere in space... Wyoming for mail.
Oh, to add on to my last post I'm sure that water conditions can matter as much with plants as with fish.

PH - ~6.1
Ammonia - 0.25 -- 0.0004 NH3 PPM
Nitrites - 0.0 PPM
Nitrates - 0.0 PPM

I really think that the 0.25 ammonia PPM may be due to my tap water being at ~0.5 PPM as to ammonia which would mean that I'm adding ammonia every time I do a water change. I've been tempted to add an 'ammonia killer' to the water I add but just about every post I see says to avoid chemicals so I just add to kill chlorine.
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
36,203
Reaction score
20,669
Location
Perth, WA
Contact your water company and find out if they add chlorine or chloramine. Chloramine is a mixture of chlorine and ammonia and remains active for a lot longer than chlorine.

If they are adding chloramine, you should use a dechlorinator that deals with chloramine. This type of dechlorinator will neutralise the chlorine and convert the remaining ammonia into ammonium for 24-48 hours. This allows the filter time to convert the ammonium into nitrite and nitrate.

It's preferable not to add chemicals to an aquarium unless necessary. But if you have chloramine, then using a dechlorinator that binds with the ammonia is safer for the fish because there is no free ammonia in the water to harm the fish. But medications and others things that people sometimes add are not normally wanted in an aquarium and should only be added if needed.

Plants aren't affected by water chemistry as much as fish are. If the pH is really acid (below 5.0) or really alkaline (above 8.0), then a number of plants will struggle. Same if the GH is too high (above 400ppm). But unless your water is extreme, most plants are fine.
 
OP
OP
jaylach

jaylach

Supporting Member
Pet of the Month!
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
1,165
Reaction score
1,062
Location
Somewhere in space... Wyoming for mail.
Contact your water company and find out if they add chlorine or chloramine. Chloramine is a mixture of chlorine and ammonia and remains active for a lot longer than chlorine.

If they are adding chloramine, you should use a dechlorinator that deals with chloramine. This type of dechlorinator will neutralise the chlorine and convert the remaining ammonia into ammonium for 24-48 hours. This allows the filter time to convert the ammonium into nitrite and nitrate.

It's preferable not to add chemicals to an aquarium unless necessary. But if you have chlorine, then using a chlorination that binds with the ammonia is safer for the fish because there is no free ammonia in the water to harm the fish. But medications and others things that people sometimes add are not normally wanted in an aquarium and should only be added if needed.

Plants aren't affected by water chemistry as much as fish are. If the pH is really acid (below 5.0) or really alkaline (above 8.0), then a number of plants will struggle. Same if the GH is too high (above 400ppm). But unless your water is extreme, most plants are fine.
Mayhaps it is my fault but what are you are you talking about chlorine when I'm asking about ammonia? :dunno: ??? Nitrite and nitrate show as zero yet ammonia show as 0,25 PPM.

Mayhaps I'm asking wrong but I don't understand why chlorine even became involved. Unless I screwed up I think that my question was about ammonia., not chlorine..........
 

AmyKieran

Fish Herder
Joined
Feb 19, 2022
Messages
1,188
Reaction score
570
Location
England
Mayhaps it is my fault but what are you are you talking about chlorine when I'm asking about ammonia? :dunno: ??? Nitrite and nitrate show as zero yet ammonia show as 0,25 PPM.

Mayhaps I'm asking wrong but I don't understand why chlorine even became involved. Unless I screwed up I think that my question was about ammonia., not chlorine..........
No Colin is talking about chloramine. Water companies either add chlorine (which is just dealt with by basic tap conditioner) or chloramine (which is ammonia + chlorine) which needs a more specific tap conditioner like seachem prime. If your water company adds chloramine, that may be where the ammonia is coming from and you may be using the wrong tap water conditioner
 
OP
OP
jaylach

jaylach

Supporting Member
Pet of the Month!
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
1,165
Reaction score
1,062
Location
Somewhere in space... Wyoming for mail.
No Colin is talking about chloramine. Water companies either add chlorine (which is just dealt with by basic tap conditioner) or chloramine (which is ammonia + chlorine) which needs a more specific tap conditioner like seachem prime. If your water company adds chloramine, that may be where the ammonia is coming from and you may be using the wrong tap water conditioner
While I love these forums the above quote messes with my mind. Can that be put in English? I mean everything I've seen here promotes to not use chemicals yet the above seems to be telling me to use chemicals.

I have been using Imaagitarium biological booster along with biological conditional additional supplements.

Tank seems fine but I'[m not getting what I need as to answers.
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
36,203
Reaction score
20,669
Location
Perth, WA
I really think that the 0.25 ammonia PPM may be due to my tap water being at ~0.5 PPM as to ammonia which would mean that I'm adding ammonia every time I do a water change. I've been tempted to add an 'ammonia killer' to the water I add but just about every post I see says to avoid chemicals so I just add to kill chlorine.
The free ammonia you are getting could be from the tap water if they add chloramine instead of chlorine.
 

Wills

Retired Moderator
Retired Moderator ⚒️
Tank of the Month!
Joined
Jun 15, 2009
Messages
9,900
Reaction score
3,608
Location
East Yorks
Great advice here already but if you are looking for some easy plants to learn with I'd always recommend Limnophilla Sessiflora, really attractive plant and fast growing. Vallisnera is always worth a try too, interesting to watch as it spreads through the substrate. Cryptocorynes are a nice plant too but slow growing like the Anubias but over time look really good. Try some floating plants too - I have red root floater which is really nice, especially if you can view the tank from underneath.
 
OP
OP
jaylach

jaylach

Supporting Member
Pet of the Month!
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
1,165
Reaction score
1,062
Location
Somewhere in space... Wyoming for mail.
The free ammonia you are getting could be from the tap water if they add chloramine instead of chlorine.
Ya, one way or another I think that we seem to indicate that my tap water MAY be an issue.

I have actually got my ammonia down to zero but only for a short time. As soon as I do a water change the ammonia goes beck to ~0.25 PPM. From tests it would seem that my tap water is an issue. I just don't understand how I'm supposed to control the tank ammonia without chemicals when the tap water is higher in ammonia than the tank. ?
 
OP
OP
jaylach

jaylach

Supporting Member
Pet of the Month!
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
1,165
Reaction score
1,062
Location
Somewhere in space... Wyoming for mail.
Great advice here already but if you are looking for some easy plants to learn with I'd always recommend Limnophilla Sessiflora, really attractive plant and fast growing. Vallisnera is always worth a try too, interesting to watch as it spreads through the substrate. Cryptocorynes are a nice plant too but slow growing like the Anubias but over time look really good. Try some floating plants too - I have red root floater which is really nice, especially if you can view the tank from underneath.
Thanks a LOT! Right now I'm just going slow as I'm still having issues with making my tank stable. The tank is doing OK and the fish seem fine but I get a lot of fluctuation in API test results. :dunno:
 

AmyKieran

Fish Herder
Joined
Feb 19, 2022
Messages
1,188
Reaction score
570
Location
England
While I love these forums the above quote messes with my mind. Can that be put in English? I mean everything I've seen here promotes to not use chemicals yet the above seems to be telling me to use chemicals.

I have been using Imaagitarium biological booster along with biological conditional additional supplements.

Tank seems fine but I'[m not getting what I need as to answers.
I’ll try and simplify it.

Yes we recommend not to use chemicals, with the exception of tap conditioner because of the chlorine or chloramine.

Chlorine (like used in swimming pools) is used by water companies to purify the water of any bad things it may have in for us to drink, however chlorine is bad for fish.

Chloramine does exactly the same thing but it’s just chlorine added with ammonia which is even worse for fish.

Adding a tap conditioner that deals with chlorine and chloramine is recommended
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
36,203
Reaction score
20,669
Location
Perth, WA
I just don't understand how I'm supposed to control the tank ammonia without chemicals when the tap water is higher in ammonia than the tank. ?
The chemicals used to neutralise chlorine and bind to the ammonia is ok to use and it's better for the fish if they aren't exposed to chlorine, chloramine or ammonia. So a decent dechlorinator that neutralises chlorine and binds/ converts the ammonia is fine to use.

When we say try to avoid using chemicals, we mean avoid adding chemicals/ medications unless you know what the disease is. Then use the right medication for the disease.

The fewer chemicals that go in the aquarium, the safer it is for the fish. So water conditioner (dechlorinator) is fine, but avoid other chemicals unless you absolutely have to use them.
 

Most reactions

Top