Fire extinguisher C02

Tuydark

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As it says in a title, I recently came across this, and I saw a guy using a C02 F.E. to supply C02 for his tanks, is this really a thing? I mean is it safe for the fish since there could be some residues or something... ??? Or is it the same?
 

mbsqw1d

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Yes, a very popular solution to providing co2 to your planted aquarium. The tank should only be filled with co2, and obviously you'd have to trust that this was the case by whoever filled it (but same applies to canisters sold for planted aquariums). Its just a means of providing pressurised co2. Some people use soda stream canisters.
Its a good idea to invest in a dual stage regulator as there can be issues when the tank runs close to empty and 'dumps' a load through the system.
Dual regs stop this from happening.
Here's mine (excuse the mess!)
IMG_20210217_195509.jpg
 

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Its how I run mine :) Its just a Co2 canister with a different fitting on the top and a different way to release the gas. If you got a cylinder (branded aquascaping or just a welding one) you undo the cap, connect your regulator and unscrew the valve to release the gas. With the fire extinguisher you remove the horn (though most dont come with it attached), screw on the regulator, remove the pin and press the handles together to release the gas. On some you can put the pin back in or use cable ties to keep the handles together.

With either type of canister you then have a flow of gas into your regulator and you use the pressure gauges to determine how much Co2 goes through to your tank. I'd recommend always going with a dual stage regulator so you can control the pressure of the gas coming out of the canister and then control the amount of pressure coming from the regulator to the bubble counter. You can then finally control your bubble counter so you can get to the level you require (generally 1 bubble per second per 100 litres is recommended)
 

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Yes, a very popular solution to providing co2 to your planted aquarium. The tank should only be filled with co2, and obviously you'd have to trust that this was the case by whoever filled it (but same applies to canisters sold for planted aquariums). Its just a means of providing pressurised co2. Some people use soda stream canisters.
Its a good idea to invest in a dual stage regulator as there can be issues when the tank runs close to empty and 'dumps' a load through the system.
Dual regs stop this from happening.
Here's mine (excuse the mess!)
View attachment 129253
:O when did you come over to the dark side!!! I didnt know you had set that up!
 

mbsqw1d

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:O when did you come over to the dark side!!! I didnt know you had set that up!
Not long.. 3-4 months? I sold my fx6 and when I dropped it off it just so happened he had a spare full FE which I took off him for £15!
It was inevitable really.. as much as I enjoy DIY, the bicarb+citric acid method was becoming tiresome!
 

Wills

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Not long.. 3-4 months? I sold my fx6 and when I dropped it off it just so happened he had a spare full FE which I took off him for £15!
It was inevitable really.. as much as I enjoy DIY, the bicarb+citric acid method was becoming tiresome!
Is that an in-line diffuser I spy too? You'll be on RO water with half a ton of Frodo Stone soon :p
 

mbsqw1d

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Is that an in-line diffuser I spy too? You'll be on RO water with half a ton of Frodo Stone soon :p
Nah i havent got in-line diffuser yet.. thats just a dodgy looking counter. I do need another system setting up on my roma 240 though.. although there's hillstream loach in there and don't think they'd appreciate it ?
 
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Tuydark

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Yes, a very popular solution to providing co2 to your planted aquarium. The tank should only be filled with co2, and obviously you'd have to trust that this was the case by whoever filled it (but same applies to canisters sold for planted aquariums). Its just a means of providing pressurised co2. Some people use soda stream canisters.
Its a good idea to invest in a dual stage regulator as there can be issues when the tank runs close to empty and 'dumps' a load through the system.
Dual regs stop this from happening.
Here's mine (excuse the mess!)
View attachment 129253
thats amazing, thanks yall, is it okay if the FE is expired ??
 

Wills

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thats amazing, thanks yall, is it okay if the FE is expired ??
That gas won’t expire it’s just the safety notice that has a time limit - I know people use them but I personally wouldn’t.

Co2 is a really big responsibility it can easily kill your fish, it can leak into your home and you have a pressurised canister under your tank. I personally think it is a good thing when you manage it properly but it should never be done on the cheap and you should never cut corners with it.
 
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Tuydark

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Yeah I got you mate thanks, and what about the regulator, I had never seen one before, you have to plug it in?? It uses electricity or those are just the fancy ones? And the fitting, is it universal? Meaning I can just buy what I choose and it'll fit?
 

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Most regulators have a solenoid on it which is like an electric clamp that blocks the Co2 when you don’t want it on if you pair this with a timer plug you can set it up with your lights as you don’t want to run Co2 when the lights are out. Plants use Co2 during the day and oxygen at night so adding Co2 at night reduces the oxygen levels in your water along with your fish so oxygen can get really low if you don’t turn it off at night. I’d recommend getting the best regulator you can afford Co2 art are a good brand but they are expensive
 
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Tuydark

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Most regulators have a solenoid on it which is like an electric clamp that blocks the Co2 when you don’t want it on if you pair this with a timer plug you can set it up with your lights as you don’t want to run Co2 when the lights are out. Plants use Co2 during the day and oxygen at night so adding Co2 at night reduces the oxygen levels in your water along with your fish so oxygen can get really low if you don’t turn it off at night. I’d recommend getting the best regulator you can afford Co2 art are a good brand but they are expensiveis
Is there any non Eletric option? With a tap or something, I'm just out of plugs rly, I don't want to fry the output
 

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Without a solenoid you would have to manually turn the bottle off every day which would be a bit dangerous. Could you not get a better multiplug? Designed to handle that kind of output? You only need 5 plugs this way (light, filter, heater, solenoid, air pump).
 

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