Will salt & pepper and peppered Corys school together?

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Ianvaldius

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So I currently have two peppered Corys and two panda corys. Naturally I need more, as everyone on here is so adamant to remind me that I really need 6 of each. My LFS doesn’t have any peppered corys but they do have salt & pepper corys and I was wondering if they schooled together because they have very similar coloration/markings.

For backstory, I started out with one peppered then realized they were schooling fish so I needed more. I read online that corys sometimes school with other types, so I got one more peppered and two pandas. Of course this wasn’t actually the case and now I need 4 more of each. I want to make sure I’m not repeating the same mistake with the salt & pepper corys as a did with the pandas. After all, if I were to have 3 types of corys, it’d make more sense to add more color like emerald corys instead of t
 
Corydoras are not a schooling fish, but rather a shoaling fish. Before you decided to add more fish in, what size aquarium are you keeping the fish?
 
They sure will. Like. Crispii said, they are rather shoaling fish. I heard that panda cories are prolific breeders and will interbreed with other corydoras, I don't think making hybrids is good. And what size tank are you keeping them in?
 
They sure will. Like. Crispii said, they are rather shoaling fish. I heard that panda cories are prolific breeders and will interbreed with other corydoras, I don't think making hybrids is good. And what size tank are you keeping them in?
I’m keeping them in a 55 gallon tank currently and hoping to move them to a 75 gallon in a few weeks.
 
Any cories will be happy to live together, they are fun to watch.
Yeah, from what I’ve observed so far, they get along with all the fish in my tank very well. I’ve seen each individual species I have “shoaling” together but the interactions I’ve observed so far inter-species I would describe as more “loose social interactions.” And yeah, they’re some of my favorite fish to watch.
 
Yeah, from what I’ve observed so far, they get along with all the fish in my tank very well. I’ve seen each individual species I have “shoaling” together but the interactions I’ve observed so far inter-species I would describe as more “loose social interactions.” And yeah, they’re some of my favorite fish to watch.
They will not constantly shoal together, you will see individuals from time to time. Since I'm giving away my convicts, I will get cories at some point later and kuhli loaches for my 29 gallon.
 
They will not constantly shoal together, you will see individuals from time to time. Since I'm giving away my convicts, I will get cories at some point later and kuhli loaches for my 29 gallon.
I have some Kuhli loaches in a 20 gallon. They’re super fun to watch! They wiggle across the sides of the tank together.
 
The only downside to having cory in your tank is when you want fry from eggs, They are very good at finding and eating the eggs ;) They are very fun to watch.
 
So I currently have two peppered Corys and two panda corys. Naturally I need more, as everyone on here is so adamant to remind me that I really need 6 of each. My LFS doesn’t have any peppered corys but they do have salt & pepper corys and I was wondering if they schooled together because they have very similar coloration/markings.

For backstory, I started out with one peppered then realized they were schooling fish so I needed more. I read online that corys sometimes school with other types, so I got one more peppered and two pandas. Of course this wasn’t actually the case and now I need 4 more of each. I want to make sure I’m not repeating the same mistake with the salt & pepper corys as a did with the pandas. After all, if I were to have 3 types of corys, it’d make more sense to add more color like emerald corys instead of t

Let's sort this out for you. Corydoras are shoaling fish, and they are highly social (not all shoalers are, it varies). Programmed into their DNA is the expectation that they will be in large shoals/grooups, and when this is denied them they can be stressed and that leads to other problems. With a few exceptions, each species of Corydoras in their habitat live alone or maybe two species, in numbers up to the hundreds.

In an aquarium, numbers are important for the health of the fish. Numbers more than species seems to be the case. I have some 41 cories representing 12 species in my "cory" tank. Spawning is regular, some fry even manage to survive (actually, it is the egg surviving and hatching). I always try to acquire at least five of a species, but sometimes for various reasons this is not possible. But it is the number in total that is the important factor to the health and well-being of these fish.

Having said that, I have observed that my pandas do seem to be more "together" than some of the other species, but this may just be my impression from the fact that this species is considerably more active in an aquarium. They like to "play" in the filter stream much more (some species never do this) so they are together much more.

As for the "salt and pepper" cory, if this is Corydoras habrosus, I would not acquire these. This is one of the "dwarf" species, and they tend to do better in larger groups of their own. I don't know what other fish are in this tank (aside from the existing cories).

The other thing to keep in mind about cories is that they should not be combined with any other substrate shoaling fish, thinking here of loaches. Have more cories, fine. You can have some of the loricariids (small plecos, whitptails, etc) but not loaches.

In a tank as large as the one mentioned here, you should have at least 15 Corydoras, and you could go up from there if you like, but no fewer. If the 75g is the tank, I would have at least 40-50. It will make a considerable difference to their health and "happiness." And I'm sure we all as aquarists want to provide a good environment; the fish will in most cases live the rest of their lives in whatever situation we provide for them.
 
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Let's sort this out for you. Corydoras are shoaling fish, and they are highly social (not all shoalers are, it varies). Programmed into their DNA is the expectation that they will be in large shoals/grooups, and when this is denied them they can be stressed and that leads to other problems. With a few exceptions, each species of Corydoras in their habitat live alone or maybe two species, in numbers up to the hundreds.

In an aquarium, numbers are important for the health of the fish. Numbers more than species seems to be the case. I have some 41 cories representing 12 species in my "cory" tank. Spawning is regular, some fry even manage to survive (actually, it is the egg surviving and hatching). I always try to acquire at least five of a species, but sometimes for various reasons this is not possible. But it is the number in total that is the important factor to the health and well-being of these fish.

Having said that, I have observed that my pandas do seem to be more "together" than some of the other species, but this may just be my impression from the fact that this species is considerably more active in an aquarium. They like to "play" in the filter stream much more (some species never do this) so they are together much more.

As for the "salt and pepper" cory, if this is Corydoras habrosus, I would not acquire these. This is one of the "dwarf" species, and they tend to do better in larger groups of their own. I don't know what other fish are in this tank (aside from the existing cories).

The other thing to keep in mind about cories is that they should not bee comined with any other substrate shoaling fish, thinking here of loaches. Have more cories, fine. You can have some of the loricariids (small plecos, whitptails, etc) but not loaches.

In a tank as large as the one mentioned here, you should have at least 15 Corydoras, and you could go up from there if you like, but no fewer. If the 75g is the tank, I would have at least 40-50. It will make a considerable difference to their health and "happiness." And I'm sure we all as aquarists want to provide a good environment; the fish will in most cases live the rest of their lives in whatever situation we provide for them.
Well said. Great info.
 

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