Heather_707

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Any advice would be appreciated. I have 1 neon tetra with a white, lumpy looking snout(pic attached), one with whitish lips. All 3 of my original tetra have some signs of fin rot but the 3 newest tetra, 3 guppies, 11 cherry shrimp, plants look good.

History:
  • Planted 20 gallon tank
  • Original 3 tetra and 2 guppy we’re established first and all was well.
  • They came down with ick. Treated it.
  • The tetra appeared to have some fin rot. Treated it.
  • All was well. Introduced 3 more tetra, one more guppy.
  • All was well. Introduced 3 shrimp.
  • 3 original tetra start looking bad. Scales look less shiny, maybe a little grey. White in one mouth, white spot above the other one’s mouth.
  • Removed all 3 original tetra to a hospital tank. Treated with kanoplex as I thought it must be Columnaris. Didn’t seem to help.
  • Treated tank with maracyn for 5 days. Waited another 3. At this point they’ve been in the hospital tank 3 weeks. No worse. Maybe they look better. Maybe it’s scarring.
  • Prob a dumb move but put them back into the main tank. Under the good lights their white marks look awful.
What could this be? I hope it’s not NTD.
 
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Heather_707

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Also, tank is cycled, good water test results all around, approx 20% water change once a week. Temp at 75
 

Colin_T

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have you tested the ammonia and nitrite?
The medications you used kill filter bacteria and whilst the problem is most likely fungus, there could be underlying causes such as ammonia or nitrite readings that are stressing the fish and contributing to this.

If they are still in the quarantine tank then I would treat them with methylene blue and see how they look in a few days time. Before you treat them, wipe down the inside glass to remove any biofilm, then do a 75% water change and gravel clean the tank if there is gravel in it. Then treat with methylene blue or another medication that has methylene blue in it.
If you find a medication with methylene blue, malachite green and formaldehyde, that combination of chemicals will kill most things that affect fish.

To work out the volume of water in the tank:
measure length x width x height in cm.
divide by 1000.
= volume in litres.

When you measure the height, measure from the top of the substrate to the top of the water.

Make sure you remove any carbon from the filter before treating.
 

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