Pea puffer with white fin

BillyBass

New Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
23
Reaction score
0
I got a group of 3 pea puffers today from a store that’s pretty far from where I live because they were doing a deal 3 for 10$. After I got the fish home and put them in a tank I realized one of them has a pectoral fin that is entirely white. I think it’s fin rot but I’m not sure. Have any of you had a fish with one white fin that didn’t seem to move as well as the other? I would bring him back but It’ll cost more in gas to go back there then it’s worth
 

Colin_T

Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
21,091
Reaction score
5,792
Location
Perth, WA
Any chance of a picture of the fish?
If the pictures are too big for the website, set the camera's resolution to its lowest setting and take some more. The lower resolution will make the images smaller and they should fit on this website. Check the pictures on your pc and find a couple that are clear and show the problem, and post them here. Make sure you turn the camera's resolution back up after you have taken the pics otherwise all your pictures will be small.

-----------------------
It is probably fungus but a picture is needed to confirm that.

You can use most common fungal treatments, Triple Sulpher/ Tri Sulfa or salt to treat minor fungal infections. If you use fungal treatments, use it at half strength or whatever the dose is for scaleless fish. Triple Sulpher can be used at full strength. See below for salt.

You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), sea salt or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.
Use 2 heaped tablespoons for the puffers.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate will affect some plants. The lower dose rate will not affect plants.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.
 
OP
B

BillyBass

New Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2019
Messages
23
Reaction score
0
961F1DCC-4039-4620-A1E7-1D774390EC91.jpeg
73A97AD1-29EA-4D41-BFB8-A03F8D79FC4D.jpeg
EB1B8A6C-E1F4-46E5-88F3-C24A21983C4E.jpeg
961F1DCC-4039-4620-A1E7-1D774390EC91.jpeg
Any chance of a picture of the fish?
If the pictures are too big for the website, set the camera's resolution to its lowest setting and take some more. The lower resolution will make the images smaller and they should fit on this website. Check the pictures on your pc and find a couple that are clear and show the problem, and post them here. Make sure you turn the camera's resolution back up after you have taken the pics otherwise all your pictures will be small.

-----------------------
It is probably fungus but a picture is needed to confirm that.

You can use most common fungal treatments, Triple Sulpher/ Tri Sulfa or salt to treat minor fungal infections. If you use fungal treatments, use it at half strength or whatever the dose is for scaleless fish. Triple Sulpher can be used at full strength. See below for salt.

You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), sea salt or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.
Use 2 heaped tablespoons for the puffers.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate will affect some plants. The lower dose rate will not affect plants.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.
Here’s some pics of the puffer and his fin. I’m currently treating the water with artemiss. I’m going to move him and the other 2 puffers to quarantine until I have it sorted out. I’ll try adding salt to the water and see if that helps too.
 
Search tags for this page

pea puffer fish

pea puffer fish fin rot

pea puffer white fins

Top