methods of cleaning hair algae off moss?

reptilenotfish

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I've got a 6g/22L planted tank, and have run into a problem. I have peacock moss growing on driftwood, and hair algae has started to colonize the moss. Tweezers and brushes only go so far, and if there is a method you would recommend, any help would be great. My tank already has high stocking (one betta, four otos, and a zebra nerite), so adding shrimp or anything else may push the bioload, and adding chemicals might kill the copepod population in the soil (the otos' food). Is there a manual solution to moss cleaning?, or am I out of luck? All comments are appreciated!

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- Tetra Whisper PF10 filter
- aqueon 6 gallon frameless tank
- Chihiros C1 light (50% power, 12 hours, 1 hour sun rise/set time)
- neo co2 (one bubble every ~18 seconds) *note: I plan on upgrading to co2 injection soon
 

ember04

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I had this problem, I just removed the moss and baked the wood it was on, it took over my tank really quickly and killed everything,
you could try removing the moss and then thoroughly washing it in water or keep the wood its on in a humid box this should keep the moss alive but no water might kill hair algea
also, increase water changes go for more regular one a week changes
but remember there is no point losing your tank and all the plants for the sake of some moss
 
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reptilenotfish

reptilenotfish

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I had this problem, I just removed the moss and baked the wood it was on, it took over my tank really quickly and killed everything,
you could try removing the moss and then thoroughly washing it in water or keep the wood its on in a humid box this should keep the moss alive but no water might kill hair algea
also, increase water changes go for more regular one a week changes
but remember there is no point losing your tank and all the plants for the sake of some moss
thank you! I really don't think I'm at risk of an algae takeover, considering i've got a pretty big cleanup crew, and can just pick off any loose strings, it's more for looks than anything else, and the moss is still healthy (It's growing almost as fast as the algae!!!). I will take you advice and make sure I stay on top of water changes.
 

Stan510

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Other ways are to add more plants to the aquarium that will make use of all the nutrients. Crypts are very good at that and are algae resistant themselves.
Its better to get more plants going then just making water changes.
I also would warn not to use Hydrogen peroxide on moss. It will kill the moss too.
You could try leaving the aquarium dark a few day- THEN add the new plants and put the lights back on.
 
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reptilenotfish

reptilenotfish

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My tank is pretty much filled with green, but are there any floaters you could recommend that won't become a bigger issue than the Algae? I know that people have had success with duckweed, but that would be a permanent plant addition if i've heard correctly on how fast they grow. if not, I might have room for fast growing stem plants in the back if there's any you'd recommend? I have recently cut down the power setting on the light to try to combat the issue. Thank you for the advice, I will certainly avoid hydrogen peroxide.
 

Stan510

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You for right now,need to cut the daylength from 12 hours to half that to get the upper hand on algae. Too much energy going in to the aquarium while not enough plants to handle it. 12 hours with a Chihiros is too much.
Shorter days might be a simple answer but one that works and still grows fine plants.
 
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reptilenotfish

reptilenotfish

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with the light, I already cut the power in half, and increased the fade to around an hour, I will definitely cut the time as well if that doesn't work, do I need more than that? As far as planting density goes, I have a spotty carpet of S. repens and possibly dwarf sagittaria (forgot the species), it covers most of the ground. i've got patches of pogostemon in the mid-ground, along with anubias nana, java fern, and a misc. stem plant I grew from seeds. along with three golf-ball sized clumps of peacock moss. is that enough or should I still lower the light? thank you again for the advice.
 

Stan510

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12 hours is too much. You might cut it 7 or 8 hours if 6 is too short a time to enjoy. I used to think 12 hours was an equator day..so-lol. But thats nature and aquarium plants aren't up to that. Maybe,one day you will have heavy enough plant growth to go 8 hours with no problems. But I have read many a hi tech user and all pretty much kept the light hours to as low as they could since the Co2 was promoting such fast growth.
I won't use Hydrogen peroxide on plants unless I can remove the plant from the aquarium and even then as near last resort. It's the same story that at first it seems to work fast..but as the days go by the plant starts to look like you poisoned it. Some people might have that down to a science in drops per capful..I've tried various strengths and still not sure what is best since different plants have different results.
But mosses are first to die on HP.
 

Stan510

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You should add an Ancistrus catfish..they don't get large and you can get them in colors and long finnage If you mortgage your home for the long finned type :lol:
You do just as good with the common $8 black Ancistrus as the others because they are not seen until feeding time. After that,they all stay in the dark.
 
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reptilenotfish

reptilenotfish

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image.jpg
image.jpg
Here are pictures. I just trimmed the moss yesterday, so most of the algae is gone, but next week I’ll probably have to try to clean it again
image.jpg
 
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reptilenotfish

reptilenotfish

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“You should add an Ancistrus catfish..they don't get large and you can get them in colors and long finnage If you mortgage your home for the long finned type :lol:
You do just as good with the common $8 black Ancistrus as the others because they are not seen until feeding time. After that,they all stay in the dark.”


I’ll be sure to research them! I do already have 4 otocinlus catfish, and they do a decent job minus the moss clumps. My betta also may have something to say about it, but thanks for the recommendation!
 

Stan510

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Nice set up. Its looking good to me..I really think just cutting the hours is all you need to do. Lay off the big water changes ( in plant aquariums) that to me keep the new tank syndrome in perpetual mode.
Is that a Fissidens? choice moss.
 

Stan510

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I will even go out there and say with that light a load of fish? You can go weeks without a water change.
Even the Buce co. and Aquarium Factory websites all ask you to NOT make big changes as the plants resent all that.
But that's just me and those company's,.Ukaps and the plant board say we are wrong. Uhuh.
 

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