Looking for a new tank

Keeeks206

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i currently have a 15g fish tank, but my corydoras had babies a few months ago and have outgrown the breeder box that they are in. I have about 10 new corys and am looking for a new tank. I want something longer rather than taller and something around 20-30 gallons maybe 40 but can’t find anything I love?? I think 20 gallons is too small. Please help
 
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Keeeks206

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i currently have a 15g fish tank, but my corydoras had babies a few months ago and have outgrown the breeder box that they are in. I have about 10 new corys and am looking for a new tank. I want something longer rather than taller and something around 20-30 gallons maybe 40 but can’t find anything I love?? I think 20 gallons is too small. Please help
I also have 4 adult corydora, 1 1-2 inch pleco, and a betta and don’t want to stuff 10 corydoras in my 15 gallon!!
 

Byron

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I agree that length and width (the "footprint") is more important than height, so you have several options depending upon the space you have for the tank. A 20 gallon long is 30 inches length by 12 inches width, but for the same footprint a 29g will give you more height for upper fish should you want any of those. Cories do often tend to relax more with fish swimming above them, but you can achieve much the same result with a good cover of floating plants.

The 40g "breeder" as it is called is 36 inches length by 18 inches width. If you have space for this footprint, the 40g is a nice tank; it is not deep (height) though still room for quiet upper fish like Ember Tetra, some of the pencilfish, hatchetfish.
 
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Keeeks206

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I agree that length and width (the "footprint" is more important than height, so you have several options depending upon the space you have for the tank. A 20 gallon long is 30 inches length by 12 inches width, but for the same footprint a 29g will give you more height for upper fish should you want any of those. Cories do often tend to relax more with fish swimming above them, but you can achieve much the same result with a good cover of floating plants.

The 40g "breeder" as it is called is 35 inches length by 18 inches width. If you have space for this footprint, the 40g is a nice tank; it is not deep (height) though still room for quiet upper fish like Ember Tetra, some of the pencilfish, hatchetfish.
I think I am leaning towards a 29 gallon as it is the same length as a 20 but is taller so I can keep more fish in it! I have a betta and do want to get some small schooling fish so I guess I wouldn’t mind getting a taller tank with the same length that I’m wanting! I think 40 might be too big!
 

Byron

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I think I am leaning towards a 29 gallon as it is the same length as a 20 but is taller so I can keep more fish in it! I have a betta and do want to get some small schooling fish so I guess I wouldn’t mind getting a taller tank with the same length that I’m wanting! I think 40 might be too big!
Not exactly sure if you are suggesting small shoaling fish in with the Betta, but male Bettas are not community fish, so they are always best alone. I know some say they have had success with a Betta in with other fish, but this is not normal, it is the exception, and if we care for our fish which I trust you do we will not force them into a scenario that is more likely to fail than maybe work. A normal healthy Betta males will not appreciate other fish in his space. And there are other threads here where the peace lasted for a time until overnight the Betta decided it had had enough of the other nuisance fish.

This also works in reverse. Many of the small peaceful shoaling fish like tetras, etc, will turn to fin nipping when they are faced with a Betta day after day. So this can be not only bad for the other fish, but bad for the Betta.
 
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Keeeks206

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Not exactly sure if you are suggesting small shoaling fish in with the Betta, but male Bettas are not community fish, so they are always best alone. I know some say they have had success with a Betta in with other fish, but this is not normal, it is the exception, and if we care for our fish which I trust you do we will not force them into a scenario that is more likely to fail than maybe work. A normal healthy Betta males will not appreciate other fish in his space. And there are other threads here where the peace lasted for a time until overnight the Betta decided it had had enough of the other nuisance fish.

This also works in reverse. Many of the small peaceful shoaling fish like tetras, etc, will turn to fin nipping when they are faced with a Betta day after day. So this can be not only bad for the other fish, but bad for the Betta.
I’ve had 4 corydoras and a pleco with my betta forever. Now I have 8-10 other baby corydora also!
 

Byron

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I’ve had 4 corydoras and a pleco with my betta forever. Now I have 8-10 other baby corydora also!
That is a very different scenario. It is upper fish that are at risk both to the Betta and themselves. Cories have no teeth so they are unlikely to be fin nipping, and being at a different level from the normal upper position of a Betta there is much less danger of trouble.
 
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