i thought I was done! What the..

Essjay

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The majority of replies in that thread are not new starters though. Some are, and forum members have persuaded some to get live plants before getting fish.
It's the die hard 'no live plants in my tank, not ever' brigade that need to do a fishless rather than fish-in cycle.


I do agree with you, live plants are the best way to go. But not everyone can be persuaded.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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The majority of replies in that thread are not new starters though. Some are, and forum members have persuaded some to get live plants before getting fish.
It's the die hard 'no live plants in my tank, not ever' brigade that need to do a fishless rather than fish-in cycle.


I do agree with you, live plants are the best way to go. But not everyone can be persuaded.
I can honestly appreciate the fishless (chemical, mathematical) method as a possible cycling process, BUT it is definitely promoted over the real (as I and others see it) 'fishless' cycling, with plants.

I suspect that some don't want to grasp that nettle of plant husbandry, when it appears so much easier to quote dosages and timings.
That said, the number of issues arising when new fishkeepers attempt to follow the plant-less method, suggests that it's not as infallible a method as some might advocate.
 

Rocky998

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The majority of replies in that thread are not new starters though. Some are, and forum members have persuaded some to get live plants before getting fish.
It's the die hard 'no live plants in my tank, not ever' brigade that need to do a fishless rather than fish-in cycle.


I do agree with you, live plants are the best way to go. But not everyone can be persuaded.
I'm planning on having 5 java ferns, 3 anubias barteri coffeefolia, java moss, and who knows how many red root floaters... Would this be enough for a plant cycle?
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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I'm planning on having 5 java ferns, 3 anubias barteri coffeefolia, java moss, and who knows how many red root floaters... Would this be enough for a plant cycle?
No.
You need relatively fast-growing plants and that doesn't normally include Java ferns or Anubias sp..
Java Moss is quite a quick grower, but it doesn't have the wider leaves that will facilitate a better cycling...unless you have lots and lots and lots of it.
The Red Root Floaters, Phyllanthus Fluitans, are a good choice.
Look for Cabomba sp., Limnophilia sp., Myriophyllum sp. and Hygrophila sp.. Elodea sp. is another to look for.

NOTE 'sp.' is just shorthand for 'species', and saves the need to list the many sub-species.
 

Rocky998

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No.
You need relatively fast-growing plants and that doesn't normally include Java ferns or Anubias sp..
Java Moss is quite a quick grower, but it doesn't have the wider leaves that will facilitate a better cycling...unless you have lots and lots and lots of it.
The Red Root Floaters, Phyllanthus Fluitans, are a good choice.
Look for Cabomba sp., Limnophilia sp., Myriophyllum sp. and Hygrophila sp.. Elodea sp. is another to look for.

NOTE 'sp.' is just shorthand for 'species', and saves the need to list the many sub-species.
Ok, ill have a look! Thanks!
 

Rocky998

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No.
You need relatively fast-growing plants and that doesn't normally include Java ferns or Anubias sp..
Java Moss is quite a quick grower, but it doesn't have the wider leaves that will facilitate a better cycling...unless you have lots and lots and lots of it.
The Red Root Floaters, Phyllanthus Fluitans, are a good choice.
Look for Cabomba sp., Limnophilia sp., Myriophyllum sp. and Hygrophila sp.. Elodea sp. is another to look for.

NOTE 'sp.' is just shorthand for 'species', and saves the need to list the many sub-species.
I looked those up and they are beautiful plants, but I was hoping to see some that don't need to be rooted in soil or floated
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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I looked those up and they are beautiful plants, but I was hoping to see some that don't need to be rooted in soil or floated
Some plants are floaters. These are always floaters and will always do their best to rise to the surface, if sunk.
The rest are either happy just hanging around, or prefer to be rooted into a substrate.

The former must never be placed in substrate, because their rhizomes will rot.

However, those that prefer to be rooted in substrate will usually manage very well, just handing around in the water.
 

Rocky998

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Some plants are floaters. These are always floaters and will always do their best to rise to the surface, if sunk.
The rest are either happy just hanging around, or prefer to be rooted into a substrate.

The former must never be placed in substrate, because their rhizomes will rot.

However, those that prefer to be rooted in substrate will usually manage very well, just handing around in the water.
Could I tie or glue those to rocks and wood then?
 

Essjay

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The plants which are usually attached to decor are anubias, java fern, bucephalandras and bolbitis - though you didn't mention the last two :)
 
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Mollyforever

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Some plants are floaters. These are always floaters and will always do their best to rise to the surface, if sunk.
The rest are either happy just hanging around, or prefer to be rooted into a substrate.

The former must never be placed in substrate, because their rhizomes will rot.

However, those that prefer to be rooted in substrate will usually manage very well, just handing around in the water.
My water wisteria(spelling?) keeps on floating to the top lol im trying to plant them on my substrate. Is that okay?
 

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