How to breed Caridina Cantonensis without using RODI water

Tacocat

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Hi there, I have a query for you guys. I wanted to start breeding caridina shrimps, as they are pretty and can yield a profit if you breed them right. However, upon doing research I found that in order to properly breed caridina shrimp it is recommended to use RO water. However, I would rather not do this, and attempt to breed them using tap water. However, I know that they have some specific mineral requirements. Can somebody tell me them please? Also if anybody knows how to breed them without remineralizing RO water please tell me thanks!
 

Lajos_Detari

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You can check these websites below.
Take note that you will have to verify the accuracy of the information here.

Some people suggested to use ADA soil to maintain the water at lower pH for Caridina shrimps.

If you are using tap water, it's best to age the water a few days before using it for your tank. This is to prevent pH swings when the water just come out from the tap.
Get a big bucket or barrel to store your water that is treated with water conditioner.

Also, don't do more than 30% water change for the first few months when the shrimps are still new to your tap water.

The next generation shrimps or shrimps that are born in your tank will be used to your tap water and they can withstand larger water change even up to 60-70% of water change.

Take note that too many internal breedings will weaken your shrimps genetics. This will happen after 1-2 years of breeding(imo).

Take note of any plants that you will use as they can bring Planaria and Hydra which can kill your shrimplets and shrimps.
It's best to sterilize and quarantine (3-4 weeks) them before using for your tank.
Some plants may also have toxic chemical that is used to kill snails in the farms.

Watch out for any parasites that can kill your shrimps when you first buy them.
There is very few medications for shrimps in the market at the moment.

For shrimps food, you can check this link:



 
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Tacocat

Tacocat

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You can check these websites below.
Take note that you will have to verify the accuracy of the information here.

Some people suggested to use ADA soil to maintain the water at lower pH for Caridina shrimps.

If you are using tap water, it's best to age the water a few days before using it for your tank. This is to prevent pH swings when the water just come out from the tap.
Also, don't do more than 30% water change for the first few months when the shrimps are still new to your tap water.

The next generation shrimps or shrimps that are born in your tank will be used to your tap water and they can withstand larger water change even up to 60-70% of water change.

Take note that too many internal breedings will weaken your shrimps genetics. This will happen after 1-2 years of breeding(imo).

Take note of any plants that you will use as they can bring Planaria and Hydra which can kill your shrimplets and shrimps.
It's best to sterilize and quarantine (3-4 weeks) them before using for your tank.
Some plants may also have toxic chemical that is used to kill snails in the farms.

Watch out for any parasites that can kill your shrimps when you first buy them.
There is very few medications for shrimps in the market at the moment.

For shrimps food, you can check this link:



What if I have an established tank with a current non-breeding colony of Caridina shrimps?
I currently have a 5-gal with 6 CRS, and my brother is adding Pintos to it. It is established and there are plenty of hiding spots and wood. My current colony is doing fine and eats the biofilm and bits of fish food that fall to the ground, but that's it. No breeding yet.

However I have only had them for 1 month so far.
Originally my main concern was interbreeding between CRS and pinto, but now I realize that it should be fine, and any hybrids should be hardier.

The pintos are coming tomorrow, so would it be wise to do a water change before we get them?
 

Lajos_Detari

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What if I have an established tank with a current non-breeding colony of Caridina shrimps?
I currently have a 5-gal with 6 CRS, and my brother is adding Pintos to it. It is established and there are plenty of hiding spots and wood. My current colony is doing fine and eats the biofilm and bits of fish food that fall to the ground, but that's it. No breeding yet.

However I have only had them for 1 month so far.
Originally my main concern was interbreeding between CRS and pinto, but now I realize that it should be fine, and any hybrids should be hardier.

The pintos are coming tomorrow, so would it be wise to do a water change before we get them?
What is your question? Can you be more specific?

If your shrimps are doing well, then you don't need to change any thing but you may want to monitor the GH and pH.

6 shrimps is too small a group. It will take longer time for you to see more shrimplets.
Usually I prefer to start with 10-20 shrimps.
Also, try to get more female than male.
If you have too many males, they will kill the females.

But starting small is good to prevent losses in case there is problem with your tank.
Ensure that your tank has some algae as the shrimps need to graze on algae the whole day just like the cow.
Shrimplets will need constant food and they may not move around much at the beginning.
 
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Tacocat

Tacocat

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What is your question? Can you be more specific?

If your shrimps are doing well, then you don't need to change any thing but you may want to monitor the GH and pH.

6 shrimps is too small a group. It will take longer time for you to see more shrimplets.
Usually I prefer to start with 10-20 shrimps.
Also, try to get more female than male.
If you have too many males, they will kill the females.

But starting small is good to prevent losses in case there is problem with your tank.
Ensure that your tank has some algae as the shrimps need to graze on algae the whole day just like the cow.
Shrimplets will need constant food and they may not move around much at the beginning.
Basically my question is: Should I do anything special to the parameters when the new shrimp arrive to the established tank tomorrow? I do not know for sure but I am pretty sure that the breeder uses RO water at the correct pH and GH. Problem is, my tanks parameters are much higher than they should be but somehow the shrimp thrive anyway.

Also about the female to males: Really? I didn't know that. Ok that's good to know. This also applies to different breeds right? So putting the CRS and Pintos together with the adequate male:female ration should be fine right?
 

Lajos_Detari

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RO water is best if you to remove all chemical in the water that can kill the shrimps.
If you want to ensure 100% safety for your shrimps, you can use RO water with GH minerals/salts.

But if you don't really require 100% safety of your shrimps, tap water can also work.
Just don't change too much water each time(30% or less).

When I accompanied a friend to buy shrimps, I helped him to choose more females that are berried/carrying eggs.
So, within about 10days, he started to see shrimplets in his tank.
 

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