HELP! Fish advice ASAP!

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Emilyruthann7

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You're not seeing any lesions of fungal like growths on the fish at all though, are you? Those tend to be the giveaway with columaris.

Worms are pretty common in guppies, most have been bred in fish farms abroad and have been exposed to both round and flat worms.

Just seen your update post: bloody patches? You didn't mention bloody patches before, did you?

For now, I would stick with salt treatment and daily water changes, monitor how they progress, then once this is dealt with, look at worming your stock, and quarantining any new fish before adding them to the main tank.

Also remove any fake plants and decor that has sharp edges, both bettas and guppies are vulnerable to torn fins from plastic plants, which can let bacteria in and lead to secondary infections.
I didn’t mention it because I thought it just happened because the fish were dead and they lost their color. As for the lesions of fungal growth, if you look close at the orange tailed female, towards her tail but not on her fin, you can see what almost resembles mold. It’s tough to see on camera but there is a patch of growth. Also, I have no fake plants in my aquarium it is completely planted with driftwood and a little stone decoration.
 

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I didn’t mention it because I thought it just happened because the fish were dead and they lost their color. As for the lesions of fungal growth, if you look close at the orange tailed female, towards her tail but not on her fin, you can see what almost resembles mold. It’s tough to see on camera but there is a patch of growth. Also, I have no fake plants in my aquarium it is completely planted with driftwood and a little stone decoration.
Ah, is it just the quarantine tank with the fake plants then? At least we can rule that out as the cause of the torn fins.

You mentioned split fins with the tetra, have they lived with the betta for some time, but only developed tail splits at the same time as the guppies?

Can you get some photos of the tetra and cories too please?
 
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Emilyruthann7

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Ah, is it just the quarantine tank with the fake plants then? At least we can rule that out as the cause of the torn fins.

You mentioned split fins with the tetra, have they lived with the betta for some time, but only developed tail splits at the same time as the guppies?

Can you get some photos of the tetra and cories too please?
I’ve attached the best pictures I can. The tetras have lived with the betta for multiple months and he’s never picked on them that I’ve seen. The splits in their tails is something I’ve just noticed today, and it looks so clean and symmetrical that I think it might be natural, but not all of them have the split. The corydoras look okay but they are a little inactive. Also, yes, the tank the guppies are in is the quarantine tank, a 5 gallon. The tank the other fish are in is the original tank where I noticed the symptoms and separated fish. I tried to get a picture of the Betta but it was very difficult as every time I got the camera to focus he started swimming again.
 

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Colin_T

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It's not TB.

Clamped fins is caused by poor water quality or an external fungal or protozoan infection. It does not look like fungus.

White patches on the body and fins can be poor water quality or an external protozoan infection (Costia, Chilodonella, Trichodina).

If the other fish are ok then it's probably an external protozoan infection.

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Check the water quality for ammonia, nitritie, nitrate, pH and GH.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

Clean the filter media/ materials in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Ti[ the bucket of dirty water on the lawn.

Add 2 heaped tablespoons of rock salt for every 20 litres (5 gallons) of tank water. Keep the salt in the tank for at least 2 weeks but no more than 4 weeks.

Monitor the fish and if there's no improvement after a couple of days post some more pictures and the water test results.

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Fish TB normally causes fish to bloat up overnight and do a stringy white poop. They normally die within 24 hours of showing these symptoms.
 
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Emilyruthann7

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It's not TB.

Clamped fins is caused by poor water quality or an external fungal or protozoan infection. It does not look like fungus.

White patches on the body and fins can be poor water quality or an external protozoan infection (Costia, Chilodonella, Trichodina).

If the other fish are ok then it's probably an external protozoan infection.

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Check the water quality for ammonia, nitritie, nitrate, pH and GH.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

Clean the filter media/ materials in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Ti[ the bucket of dirty water on the lawn.

Add 2 heaped tablespoons of rock salt for every 20 litres (5 gallons) of tank water. Keep the salt in the tank for at least 2 weeks but no more than 4 weeks.

Monitor the fish and if there's no improvement after a couple of days post some more pictures and the water test results.

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Fish TB normally causes fish to bloat up overnight and do a stringy white poop. They normally die within 24 hours of showing these symptoms.
We are going out today to do some shopping
It's not TB.

Clamped fins is caused by poor water quality or an external fungal or protozoan infection. It does not look like fungus.

White patches on the body and fins can be poor water quality or an external protozoan infection (Costia, Chilodonella, Trichodina).

If the other fish are ok then it's probably an external protozoan infection.

----------------------
Check the water quality for ammonia, nitritie, nitrate, pH and GH.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

Clean the filter media/ materials in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Ti[ the bucket of dirty water on the lawn.

Add 2 heaped tablespoons of rock salt for every 20 litres (5 gallons) of tank water. Keep the salt in the tank for at least 2 weeks but no more than 4 weeks.

Monitor the fish and if there's no improvement after a couple of days post some more pictures and the water test results.

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Fish TB normally causes fish to bloat up overnight and do a stringy white poop. They normally die within 24 hours of showing these symptoms.
We are going out today to do some shopping for some fish stuff. I’m gonna look for a test kit to test to kh and gh and I’ll post the results. A couple things I’m still confused about and need some answers before I buy a couple things.
I have strong beliefs that it is Columnaris, as one of the fish have stringy white poo with bubbles, some of the guppies have developed pink patches on their cheeks, a couple of the guppies have poor appetite and some of them have strange fuzzy patches on their bodies. I read to treat Columnaris use API Furan-2 combined with Kanaplex. The past 24 hours they’ve been on aquarium salt and Kanaplex. Aside from one or two who I can barely tell might have lost more of their tail fin, They aren’t worse but aren’t better... which is a good sign considering the first two fish I noticed symptoms died within 24 hours after I first noticed the symptoms (one of them, a female got extremely bloated before she died). So my questions are, is it Columnaris? If not, should I still get the Furan-2, since it treats bacterial infections and can help? Also what is an external protozoan infection? I’ve tried researching but it’s coming up with human stuff.
 

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Don't bother buying a GH or KH test kit because GH and KH are quite stable and don't normally change unless you change your water source.

Take a glass full of tap water and a glass of tank water to the local pet shop and ask them to test the GH and KH for you. Write the results down in numbers when they do the tests. Ask them what the test results are measured in (eg: ppm, dGH or something else), and write that down too.

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It's not Columnaris and you don't want to add anti-biotics (like Furan2) to a tank unless you absolutely have to.

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Stringy white poop is caused by an internal problem (protozoans, bacteria or worms). In guppies it is usually intestinal worms.

See next post (Post #52) for more information on stringy white poop and its causes.

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Pink patches on the cheeks are the gill filaments under the gill covers (gills). This is normal on fish with pale coloured gill covers.

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White fluffy patches on fish is Saprolegnia fungus, but I don't see any fungus on your fish. I do see white clamped fins and that is usually external protozoan infections.

Salt will treat most external protozoan infections as well as minor fungal and bacterial infections, and it treats gill flukes.

If you want to treat the fish for intestinal worms, then look for Praziquantel and Levamisole or Flubendazole.
Praziquantel treats tapeworm and gill flukes.
Levamisole treats thread/ round worms.
Flubendazole treats both types of intestinal worms and gill flukes.
 

Colin_T

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Fish do a stringy white poop for several reasons.
1) Internal Bacterial Infections causes the fish to stop eating, swell up like a balloon, breath heavily at the surface or near a filter outlet, do stringy white poop, and die within 24-48 hours of showing these symptoms. This cannot normally be cured because massive internal organ failure has already occurred.


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2) Internal Protozoan Infections cause the fish to lose weight rapidly (over a week or two), fish continues to eat and swim around but not as much as normal, does stringy white poop. If not treated the fish dies a week or so after these symptoms appear. Metronidazole normally works well for this.

There is a medication (API General Cure) that contains Praziquantel and Metronidazole.

It's interesting that API and the Californian government have listed Metronidazole as a carcinogen. That's a concern considering it was widely used to treat intestinal infections in people.

Anyway, if you use this or any medication, handle with care, don't inhale the medication, and wash hands with soapy water after treating the fish or working in the tank.


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3) Intestinal Worms like tapeworm and threadworms cause the fish to lose weight, continue eating and swimming normally, and do a stringy white poop. Fish can do this for months and not be too badly affected. In some cases, fish with a bad worm infestation will actually gain weight and get fat and look like a pregnant guppy. This is due to the huge number of worms inside the fish.

Livebearers like guppies, mollies, swordtails & platies are regularly infected with gill flukes and intestinal worms. If the fish are still eating well, then worms is the most likely cause.

You can use Praziquantel to treat tapeworm and gill flukes. And Levamisole to treat thread/ round worms. If you can't find these medications, look for Flubendazole, which treats both lots of worms.

Remove carbon from filters before treatment and increase aeration/ surface turbulence to maximise oxygen levels in the water.

You treat the fish once a week for 4 weeks. The first treatment will kill any worms in the fish. The second, third and forth treatments kill any baby worms that hatch from eggs inside the fish's digestive tract.

Treat every fish tank in the house at the same time to prevent cross contamination.
You do a 75% water change and complete gravel clean 24-48 hours after treatment. Clean the filter 24 hours after treatment too.

Do not use the 2 medications together. If you want to treat both medications in a short space of time, use Praziquantel on day one. Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate on day 2 & 3. Treat the tank with Levamisole on day 4 and do a 75% water change and gravel clean on day 5, 6 & 7 and then start with Praziquantel again on day 8.

The water changes will remove most of the medication so you don't overdose the fish the next time you treat them. The gravel cleaning will suck out any worms and eggs that have been expelled by the fish. Repeating the treatment for 3-4 doses at weekly intervals will kill any worms that hatch from eggs. At the end of the treatment you will have healthier fish.
 
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Emilyruthann7

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Fish do a stringy white poop for several reasons.
1) Internal Bacterial Infections causes the fish to stop eating, swell up like a balloon, breath heavily at the surface or near a filter outlet, do stringy white poop, and die within 24-48 hours of showing these symptoms. This cannot normally be cured because massive internal organ failure has already occurred.


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2) Internal Protozoan Infections cause the fish to lose weight rapidly (over a week or two), fish continues to eat and swim around but not as much as normal, does stringy white poop. If not treated the fish dies a week or so after these symptoms appear. Metronidazole normally works well for this.

There is a medication (API General Cure) that contains Praziquantel and Metronidazole.

It's interesting that API and the Californian government have listed Metronidazole as a carcinogen. That's a concern considering it was widely used to treat intestinal infections in people.

Anyway, if you use this or any medication, handle with care, don't inhale the medication, and wash hands with soapy water after treating the fish or working in the tank.


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3) Intestinal Worms like tapeworm and threadworms cause the fish to lose weight, continue eating and swimming normally, and do a stringy white poop. Fish can do this for months and not be too badly affected. In some cases, fish with a bad worm infestation will actually gain weight and get fat and look like a pregnant guppy. This is due to the huge number of worms inside the fish.

Livebearers like guppies, mollies, swordtails & platies are regularly infected with gill flukes and intestinal worms. If the fish are still eating well, then worms is the most likely cause.

You can use Praziquantel to treat tapeworm and gill flukes. And Levamisole to treat thread/ round worms. If you can't find these medications, look for Flubendazole, which treats both lots of worms.

Remove carbon from filters before treatment and increase aeration/ surface turbulence to maximise oxygen levels in the water.

You treat the fish once a week for 4 weeks. The first treatment will kill any worms in the fish. The second, third and forth treatments kill any baby worms that hatch from eggs inside the fish's digestive tract.

Treat every fish tank in the house at the same time to prevent cross contamination.
You do a 75% water change and complete gravel clean 24-48 hours after treatment. Clean the filter 24 hours after treatment too.

Do not use the 2 medications together. If you want to treat both medications in a short space of time, use Praziquantel on day one. Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate on day 2 & 3. Treat the tank with Levamisole on day 4 and do a 75% water change and gravel clean on day 5, 6 & 7 and then start with Praziquantel again on day 8.

The water changes will remove most of the medication so you don't overdose the fish the next time you treat them. The gravel cleaning will suck out any worms and eggs that have been expelled by the fish. Repeating the treatment for 3-4 doses at weekly intervals will kill any worms that hatch from eggs. At the end of the treatment you will have healthier fish.
Wow, this is a lot of information. Thank you! My next question is, why are some of my guppies losing their tail fins so quickly - one of them her tail fin is already down to her body. Is this fin rot as a secondary infection? Also this guppy along with one other aren’t eating, but the other ones (also appear to have fin rot, but not stringy poop) are eating. Also if it is worms, is the cause the addition of the two new fish about 1-2 weeks ago? Did the worms spread from them to the other guppies?
Thank you so much for your help!
 
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Emilyruthann7

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Fish do a stringy white poop for several reasons.
1) Internal Bacterial Infections causes the fish to stop eating, swell up like a balloon, breath heavily at the surface or near a filter outlet, do stringy white poop, and die within 24-48 hours of showing these symptoms. This cannot normally be cured because massive internal organ failure has already occurred.


-----
2) Internal Protozoan Infections cause the fish to lose weight rapidly (over a week or two), fish continues to eat and swim around but not as much as normal, does stringy white poop. If not treated the fish dies a week or so after these symptoms appear. Metronidazole normally works well for this.

There is a medication (API General Cure) that contains Praziquantel and Metronidazole.

It's interesting that API and the Californian government have listed Metronidazole as a carcinogen. That's a concern considering it was widely used to treat intestinal infections in people.

Anyway, if you use this or any medication, handle with care, don't inhale the medication, and wash hands with soapy water after treating the fish or working in the tank.


-----
3) Intestinal Worms like tapeworm and threadworms cause the fish to lose weight, continue eating and swimming normally, and do a stringy white poop. Fish can do this for months and not be too badly affected. In some cases, fish with a bad worm infestation will actually gain weight and get fat and look like a pregnant guppy. This is due to the huge number of worms inside the fish.

Livebearers like guppies, mollies, swordtails & platies are regularly infected with gill flukes and intestinal worms. If the fish are still eating well, then worms is the most likely cause.

You can use Praziquantel to treat tapeworm and gill flukes. And Levamisole to treat thread/ round worms. If you can't find these medications, look for Flubendazole, which treats both lots of worms.

Remove carbon from filters before treatment and increase aeration/ surface turbulence to maximise oxygen levels in the water.

You treat the fish once a week for 4 weeks. The first treatment will kill any worms in the fish. The second, third and forth treatments kill any baby worms that hatch from eggs inside the fish's digestive tract.

Treat every fish tank in the house at the same time to prevent cross contamination.
You do a 75% water change and complete gravel clean 24-48 hours after treatment. Clean the filter 24 hours after treatment too.

Do not use the 2 medications together. If you want to treat both medications in a short space of time, use Praziquantel on day one. Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate on day 2 & 3. Treat the tank with Levamisole on day 4 and do a 75% water change and gravel clean on day 5, 6 & 7 and then start with Praziquantel again on day 8.

The water changes will remove most of the medication so you don't overdose the fish the next time you treat them. The gravel cleaning will suck out any worms and eggs that have been expelled by the fish. Repeating the treatment for 3-4 doses at weekly intervals will kill any worms that hatch from eggs. At the end of the treatment you will have healthier fish.

Ive attached a lot of pictures of the guppies (and one Platty) in the quarantine tank. The healthy fish are in there because when I first began quarantining the fish, I noticed only my guppies were showing symptoms of fin rot, since I have shrimp in my main tank I wanted to treat with salt and kanaplex (I’m currently only treating with salt). The Platty was showing possible signs so I didn’t want to take the chance and moved him to the quarantine tank, however him along with some of my guppies are currently looking perfectly healthy. The weird part about this entire situation is each guppy has a different symptom. I’ll go over each of them.
So I’ll start by saying the two newest fish, guppies a male and female, the ones that died, I bought them from a pet store and their tanks didn’t look the best. I shouldn’t have bought them as my sister warned me that their fish aren’t well taken care of, but I wasn’t thinking straight and bought them. Those two were the ones that died first. The male was first and before he started showing symptoms he seemed extremely healthy, he was one of the bigger guys and swimming around happily. I noticed the day after a water change that he was scratching up against plants, the thermometer and staying completely vertical at the top of the tank, he was lined up in between the thermometer and the tank wall. Since I haven’t had any problems and he appeared before to be one of the most active fish in my tank, I didn’t worry TOO much about it, but I kept it in the back of my head. A couple hours later I found him dead. The female looked fine, aside from a small tear in her fin possibly caused another fish (I’ll admit the tank was a little overcrowded after the two new additions, but my levels were perfect and I kept up with water changes and they appeared to have plenty of swimming room) then within a 24 hour period, she was SEVERELY scratching against plants, gasping for breath at the top of the tank, struggling to swim, red patches appeared inside her, she was pale and wouldn’t eat, and her stomach blew up and she died.
Now, here are the symptoms of the currently living fish.
Orange/Red/Black tailed female:
As you can see, her tail is rotting away very quickly. She has stringy white poop, refuses to eat, either swims at the top of the tank, the bottom, or rests somewhere. She doesn’t swim around a lot. Her top fin I think is clamped and there is a webby/fluffy substance on her left side towards her tail, which is why I thought it was a fungus or bacterial infection. Before all this started happening I thought she was pregnant, as she was beginning to Square up, but she’s a young one so her belly wasn’t giant like some of the older ones are. But one day I thought she had her babies but I never found any baby guppies anywhere. Now it’s difficult for me to tell what’s going on with her as she’s showing so many different symptoms.
The pink tuxedo guppy(Black/blue tail, orange outline and pink body)
He started with just a split in his tail but it’s rotting pretty quickly. Of all my fish, including the betta, he was the most aggressive, but he never chased anybody, he would just give pecks if somebody was in his way and I never noticed him doing any damage. Now, he’s refusing to eat, his stomach appears normal and his tail is rotting away quick. He’s staying at the top of the tank and appears dead but his fins are moving and he is breathing.
The orange and white guppy:
He’s the one with the most pink gills, it’s tough for me to say whether they were there or not before because I didn’t sit down and stare at his gills until now, and he was one of the first guppies to the tank. Other than that he’s healthy
The fanciest guppy with the colorful design and flowy tail:
I don’t know what he’s called, but he is my prettiest guppy. His tail is starting to rot, but other than that he seems healthy.
The other guppies in the tank, the cobra (yellow with black dots), female with a blue and white tail, and fancy guppy with a black/blue/orange faded tail, appear healthy. They are active and swimming around, tails look fine and they’re eating normally, along with the Platty.
The difficult part of this is, I look at the orange tailed female and think it’s Columnaris because of the stringy/fluffy stuff on her back, and then I look at the pink tuxedo mail and think it’s some sort of infection... but then I look at the pretty guy and think it’s just fin rot. One person said I definitely have multiple things going on, however I don’t have multiple quarantine tanks to treat different things. In case this information helps you at all, here are the 4 tanks in the household, biggest to smallest.
50 gallon Cichlid tank, newest tank and my sisters. She just bought a new siphon and equipment to do water changes so my tanks don’t contaminate here’s.
20 gallon random tank, my sisters tank. She has a crayfish in here with some random fish, like tetras, Danios (one of the danios came with the two fish that died, the guy caught him by accident and gave him to us for free so she took him, and all her fish look perfectly fine), a dwarf gourami, and a Platty.
10 gallon planted tank, my original tank. This is where the guppies used to be with the other fish (also shrimp). Since there is shrimp and plants in here, I try not to use treatment because I’ve invested a lot in this tank.
5 gallon Betta/quarantine tank. Normally we use this tank for my sisters betta fish, but when we need a quarantine tank we put the betta in a vase and clean the tank thoroughly before and after quarantine.
Thank you again for all your time and help and I truly appreciate it!
 

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Emilyruthann7

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Fish do a stringy white poop for several reasons.
1) Internal Bacterial Infections causes the fish to stop eating, swell up like a balloon, breath heavily at the surface or near a filter outlet, do stringy white poop, and die within 24-48 hours of showing these symptoms. This cannot normally be cured because massive internal organ failure has already occurred.


-----
2) Internal Protozoan Infections cause the fish to lose weight rapidly (over a week or two), fish continues to eat and swim around but not as much as normal, does stringy white poop. If not treated the fish dies a week or so after these symptoms appear. Metronidazole normally works well for this.

There is a medication (API General Cure) that contains Praziquantel and Metronidazole.

It's interesting that API and the Californian government have listed Metronidazole as a carcinogen. That's a concern considering it was widely used to treat intestinal infections in people.

Anyway, if you use this or any medication, handle with care, don't inhale the medication, and wash hands with soapy water after treating the fish or working in the tank.


-----
3) Intestinal Worms like tapeworm and threadworms cause the fish to lose weight, continue eating and swimming normally, and do a stringy white poop. Fish can do this for months and not be too badly affected. In some cases, fish with a bad worm infestation will actually gain weight and get fat and look like a pregnant guppy. This is due to the huge number of worms inside the fish.

Livebearers like guppies, mollies, swordtails & platies are regularly infected with gill flukes and intestinal worms. If the fish are still eating well, then worms is the most likely cause.

You can use Praziquantel to treat tapeworm and gill flukes. And Levamisole to treat thread/ round worms. If you can't find these medications, look for Flubendazole, which treats both lots of worms.

Remove carbon from filters before treatment and increase aeration/ surface turbulence to maximise oxygen levels in the water.

You treat the fish once a week for 4 weeks. The first treatment will kill any worms in the fish. The second, third and forth treatments kill any baby worms that hatch from eggs inside the fish's digestive tract.

Treat every fish tank in the house at the same time to prevent cross contamination.
You do a 75% water change and complete gravel clean 24-48 hours after treatment. Clean the filter 24 hours after treatment too.

Do not use the 2 medications together. If you want to treat both medications in a short space of time, use Praziquantel on day one. Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate on day 2 & 3. Treat the tank with Levamisole on day 4 and do a 75% water change and gravel clean on day 5, 6 & 7 and then start with Praziquantel again on day 8.

The water changes will remove most of the medication so you don't overdose the fish the next time you treat them. The gravel cleaning will suck out any worms and eggs that have been expelled by the fish. Repeating the treatment for 3-4 doses at weekly intervals will kill any worms that hatch from eggs. At the end of the treatment you will have healthier fish.
Just came downstairs and looked at my 10 gallon - one of my tetras has more rips on her fins and have has discolored patches in her scales. I’m not sure what to do as I can’t treat this tank because of the plants and shrimp, and the only quarantine tank I have is the 5 gallon with 8 fish in it already... help? I have 6 tetras in total.
 

Colin_T

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Guppies and other common livebearers are regularly infected with external protozoans and various bacteria, and they regularly have intestinal worms. They should always be quarantined for 4 weeks before being added to an established tank.

The new fish might have introduced bacteria or protozoans but the diseases were probably in the tank before that and it's gotten worse with the addition of more fish.

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The fish doing a stringy white poop and not eating has an internal bacterial infection and will probably die because lots of damage has already occurred and when a fish stops eating, they don't normally survive.

The fish's tail looks like it is being bitten by something and fish will try to eat other sick fish in the tank.

The male with the orange tail looks like it has an external protozoan and possibly bacterial infection on the tail and top of the body. It also appears to have gill flukes.

The male with the black tail could have fin rot or it could be getting bitten by someone too.

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I'm not sure what else is in the tank but I would load the tanks up with salt and keep it salty for a month and see how they go.
 
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Emilyruthann7

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Guppies and other common livebearers are regularly infected with external protozoans and various bacteria, and they regularly have intestinal worms. They should always be quarantined for 4 weeks before being added to an established tank.

The new fish might have introduced bacteria or protozoans but the diseases were probably in the tank before that and it's gotten worse with the addition of more fish.

------------------
The fish doing a stringy white poop and not eating has an internal bacterial infection and will probably die because lots of damage has already occurred and when a fish stops eating, they don't normally survive.

The fish's tail looks like it is being bitten by something and fish will try to eat other sick fish in the tank.

The male with the orange tail looks like it has an external protozoan and possibly bacterial infection on the tail and top of the body. It also appears to have gill flukes.

The male with the black tail could have fin rot or it could be getting bitten by someone too.

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I'm not sure what else is in the tank but I would load the tanks up with salt and keep it salty for a month and see how they go.
So should I do daily water changes and add in salt after each water change? It’s a 5 gallon tank and the bag says to do 1/2 tbsp per 5 gallons for stress relief and to use 1 tbsp with something else for fish diseases... I’ve been adding 1/2 tbsp after each water change.
Also, should I just leave the neon tetras in the 10 gallon and see what happens?
 

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I am positive they weren’t getting picked on by my Betta. No, I do not know my water hardness either.
Male guppies pick on each other too. That’s a split, not fin rot. The salt Colin_T suggested will heal it up.
 

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So should I do daily water changes and add in salt after each water change? It’s a 5 gallon tank and the bag says to do 1/2 tbsp per 5 gallons for stress relief and to use 1 tbsp with something else for fish diseases... I’ve been adding 1/2 tbsp after each water change.
Also, should I just leave the neon tetras in the 10 gallon and see what happens?
You can do a big water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week or a couple of times a week, it's up to you. But when you do a water change, treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank so the salinity in the aquarium remains constant.
eg: you remove 5 gallons of water, you treat 5 gallons of new water with salt and then add that water to the tank.

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Add 2 heaped tablespoons of rock salt for every 20 litres (5 gallons) of tank water.

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Yes, leave the neons in the tank and treat all the fish at the same time to prevent cross contamination.
 

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