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Cycling question Fluval Spec V

Discussion in 'Cycle your Tank' started by Guppylover3x, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fish Addict
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    I’m setting up Betta tank with half of my old media from my guppy tank soon.

    I’m wondering how long after setting it up I could add a fish in? I know there’s very little beneficial bacteria in the water.

    Any advice would be appreciated, thank you!
     
    #1 Guppylover3x, Jun 14, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  2. FishFinatic77

    FishFinatic77 Fish Crazy

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    Adding used media into a new tank will not instantly cycle it. It will speed the process up, but it won't immediately be perfect for fish.
    I used old filter media for my betta tank, and it still took about three weeks.
    I would recommend doing a fishless cycle and waiting until your tank is completely ready. I know it's hard to wait, but your fish will be a lot happier! ;)
     
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  3. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fish Addict
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    I have actually heard that it does create an instant cycle before.

    Thanks for your help
     
  4. Silencedogood

    Silencedogood Fish Crazy

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    I would do a fishless cycle and let the tank run for 2 months or so. Adding beneficial bacteria also helps a lot.
     
  5. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    If you have an established filter that has been running for more than 2 months, you can fill up the new tank with dechlorinated water and let it run for 24 hours. Then make sure both tanks have the same temperature, pH, GH, etc. If they are the same, take half the established filter media and put it in the new tank. Add a fish within 24 hours of adding the filter media, and away you go.
     
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  6. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fish Addict
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    Thank you for your reply Colin, very informative as always.

    I’ve actually removed half of my media already but I’ve kept it soaked in a bowl. I needed to make sure it didn’t disturb my established guppy tank, and it hasn’t. The tanks been set up well over 6 months.

    I’m guessing the parameters will have to be different for both tanks. With bettas needing softer water.

    I’ve got minerals in my guppy tank at the moment. Because the water is naturally softer where I live.

    I was hoping to get the tank set up and going today. Would it be harmful if it was less than 24 hours before the fish goes in?

    I haven’t ever introduced a fish within a shorter time frame than 24 hours before.

    Thanks for your help! :)
     
  7. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    New tanks with new tap water should be aerated and dechlorinated for at least 24 hours before fish are introduced.

    You can add fish any time within 24 hours of the established filter being added to the new tank.

    If you want to set up the tank today, half fill (or more) it with water from the established tank and top it up with dechlorinated tap water. Put the established filter media in the new filter and get it running. Add the fish.

    If your guppy tank has harder water, you can still use it to set up a Betta tank. And the GH will come down over time whenever you do a water change.
     
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  8. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fish Addict
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    I regret carrying out a water change in my established tank yesterday now. Hopefully I can’t get my nitrates up a bit again, by feeding a bit earlier today.

    Thank you for all your help @Colin_T

    :thanks:
     
  9. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    what the hell are you talking about, get your nitrates up again?

    doing a water change yesterday is fine. Just use the water from the established tank now and top it up with new water. You can do a water change every day as long as the new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.
     
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  10. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fish Addict
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    Lol. Maybe I should have clarified further. My nitrates were at 10. Now I’ve done a water change there even less than that.

    I’m sure they’ll still show up once I move the water into the new tank.
     
  11. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    you want the nitrates as low as possible.
     
  12. Metalhead88

    Metalhead88 Fish Crazy

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    I'm with all of colin's advice he's given.

    New tanks can be instantly cycled if the media has enough bacteria to keep up with the bio load. If you think that half of your filter power would be good enough for the new tank - your good to go.

    Test your water - especially for ammonia.

    Your nitrates are in a good spot and have no effect on cycling. Nitrates are the end product of the cycle, the lower the better.
     
  13. Jan Cavalieri

    Jan Cavalieri Fish Crazy
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    "I’ve actually removed half of my media already but I’ve kept it soaked in a bowl. I needed to make sure it didn’t disturb my established guppy tank, and it hasn’t. The tanks been set up well over 6 months. "


    Maybe I'm wrong on this but if she takes old established media that's been sitting around in a tank or bowl for awhile wont that media be dead? When there are no fish continuously adding ammonia to the tank - the bacteria that convert ammonia will cease to exist - you would have to continuously add ammonia to the tank to keep the biofilter useable. In any case, just test the water and de-chlorinate any new water. If ammonia, nitrites and nitrates are all zero then add fish 24 hours after adding the de-clorinater or live life on the edge and throw them in there after only 23 hours. But if the water chemisty is all messed up then you are going to have to cycle the tank again with either the old or new media - doesn't matter;
     
  14. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    If a sponge or filter has been sitting in a container of water without fish for more than a couple of weeks, the bacteria that was in it will go dormant or die off. The filter is turned off and there is no water flowing through the media, then the bacteria eventually die from lack of oxygen.

    If the filter is running continuously and there is a source of ammonia, then the bacteria will continue to live.
     
  15. Metalhead88

    Metalhead88 Fish Crazy

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    Yep. I saw that and didnt exactly know what the plan was with the media in the bowl....but yeah. The media should be left in the filter until it's ready to be moved.
     

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