Anyone tried putting swordtails into marine tank?

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Ben

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i dont think its possible but sailfin mollies can slowly be acclimated to salwater :)

DD
 

LoachLover

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No I don't think it's possible, and even if you were able to do it the fish wouldn't be happy.
 

Chac

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If you are running a Full Marine Setup I would suggest increasing the Sg to TOL (True Ocean Levels) of 1.026

Del
 

daudy_dojo

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Dwarf_Dude said:
i dont think its possible but sailfin mollies can slowly be acclimated to salwater :)

DD
yea you can DD but you have to watch it and dont add any coral! :p they will get stung... :-( i hate getting stung so i bet they will too!
 

Ben

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daudy_dojo said:
Dwarf_Dude said:
i dont think its possible but sailfin mollies can slowly be acclimated to salwater :)

DD
yea you can DD but you have to watch it and dont add any coral! :p they will get stung... :-( i hate getting stung so i bet they will too!
as said in the pinned topic somewhere....
corals dont sting, only anenomes(sp?)

DD
 

Ed4567

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corals dont sting, only anenomes(sp?)

Technically all corals sting; they are members of the Cnidaria group, which are characterised by having stinging cells (and some other dull things). However a large number of corals do not have a surficiently strong sting to bother fish sized things (there are some exceptions- frogspawn LPS corals etc).

http://www.wetwebmedia.com/cnidaria.htm
 

dwarfgourami

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At the risk of revealing my ignorance- is there any evidence that swordtails actually do live in saltwater in the wild? I know sailfin mollies can move between freshwater and brackish at different stages of their lives, but do swordtails? If not, I don't see why one should want to put them in a marine tank; if they do, it might be quite ok.
 
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Swordtails wouldn't even be able to tolerate a brackish enviroment for long and would certainly die in a marine enviroment. Simply put, do you see any swordtails swimming around in the ocean? No, and theres good reason to that too.
 

Ben

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Tokis-Phoenix said:
Swordtails wouldn't even be able to tolerate a brackish enviroment for long and would certainly die in a marine enviroment. Simply put, do you see any swordtails swimming around in the ocean? No, and theres good reason to that too.
swordtails can live in a light brakish enviroment.
its light but still brakish. salt is recomended with them, even when not sick

DD
 

RockabillyGuy

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Swordtails are freshwater fish, like all xiphophorus familie. They dont need salt, and can tolerate only small dosage. No need to fight against pollution with salt. Just keep Your system clean. Take care of Your livebearers like discus breeders taking care of their discuses. "Livebearers are strong fish"  = Myth! They need care.
 

DrRob

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You've resurrected an old one here, this is a topic from 2005.
 
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