Adding Play sand as a substrate in empty tank

imw

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Hi,

So wash well. (given ) Do I have some water in tank and allow sand to filter through water or can I just add - is there a amount that is to much to add (tank will be planted) - just thinking about reducing chance of Hydrogen Sulfide building up and thought if sand filtered through water before setting on bottom this would help ?

Thoughts please.

ATB

Tets.

 

Naughts

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4 or 5cm depth is good as the roots have room to spread a bit.
 

Byron

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Agree with others here. To avoid excess cloudiness, I always dump the rinsed sand in the empty (no water) tank, then arrange the hardscape (wood, rock, etc), then add a few inches of water so I can add the plants (it is easy to break them if there is no water to support them when planting). When finished, drain out the water down to the sand. Then fill with fresh tap water, using a bowl placed on the sand into which the water runs; this will cause very little disturbance of the sand, and keep the water clearer. Add conditioner before adding the fish.
 
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imw

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Hi,

Just revisiting this thread, and have a few concerns.

The more I read about play sand the more confused and concerns I have.

All the rinsing of sand (juwel rio 240) will waste a great deal of water.

Play Sand may/will become compact and run the risk of gas bubbles being released.

So, I know its cheap, but my budget allows me a other options, so ideas please (to include - does not need rinsing, will allow bottom feeders to thrive - thinking about cory's, and will help plants establish and root)

Some thoughts please.

Thanks

Tets
 

PheonixKingZ

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ADA aqua soil is a great substrate, but it is rather expensive.
 

Colin_T

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All the rinsing of sand (juwel rio 240) will waste a great deal of water.
Welcome to fish keeping :)
Everything we do with fish is a waste of water :)

All sand can compact and get anaerobic air pockets trapped under it. However, this is less likely to happen in sand if it is cleaned well before being added to the tank. Once the sand is in the tank, very little will get trapped under it because the dirt and debris sits on top of the sand. You can also stir the sand up each week by running your fingers through it, and this will help to prevent anaerobic air pockets.

Anaerobic are pockets are more likely to occur in deep sand beds (3-4 inches +). If you only have an inch of sand it is unlikely to get anaerobic pockets and Corydoras catfish will help stir the sand up.

Some people use Malaysian trumpet/ livebearing snails to helps stir up the sand but I don't like these snails because they can't be controlled.
 
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imw

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Welcome to fish keeping :)
Everything we do with fish is a waste of water :)

All sand can compact and get anaerobic air pockets trapped under it. However, this is less likely to happen in sand if it is cleaned well before being added to the tank. Once the sand is in the tank, very little will get trapped under it because the dirt and debris sits on top of the sand. You can also stir the sand up each week by running your fingers through it, and this will help to prevent anaerobic air pockets.

Anaerobic are pockets are more likely to occur in deep sand beds (3-4 inches +). If you only have an inch of sand it is unlikely to get anaerobic pockets and Corydoras catfish will help stir the sand up.

Some people use Malaysian trumpet/ livebearing snails to helps stir up the sand but I don't like these snails because they can't be controlled.
Hi,

Further up in the thread it was suggested depth of sand to be 1.5 to 2 inch ? so more confusion - also what about the plants covered with sand - and air pockets there ? - also will not the roots struggle as play sand is fairly dense ?

Tets
 

Byron

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Hi,

Further up in the thread it was suggested depth of sand to be 1.5 to 2 inch ? so more confusion - also what about the plants covered with sand - and air pockets there ? - also will not the roots struggle as play sand is fairly dense ?

Tets

There is so much misinformation in this hobby it is not surprising many have such difficulty with keeping their fish alive/healthy. All the negatives you mentioned for example are false...if you go about it correctly, as @Colin_T said above.

Any substrate will compact if it is not properly looked after. I've had no more trouble from my play sand substrates in all 8 tanks over the past 8-9 years than I had with the gravel previously. The substrate in my present 40g which houses my 40 Corydoras primarily is never touched. It is about 1.5 inches depth when spread evenly; the water flow and fish activity arranges it and I leave it alone.

Plants will grow fine in sand; it is after all the closest (but safest) thing to the natural mud/soil/sand of their native habitats. It is easy to add substrate tab fertilizer for those plants requiring "good" nutrition, and it is much safer for fish. During photosynthesis, plants release "waste" oxygen through their roots.

Many fish need sand, and almost all do well over it, so this avoids problems when it comes to selecting fish you want.

I never over-wash the sand; it gets maybe four or five rinses and that's it. I had to do this when I used gravel, and with the so-called "plant" substrate I was once foolishly convinced to try, complete waste of money.
 
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imw

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There is so much misinformation in this hobby it is not surprising many have such difficulty with keeping their fish alive/healthy. All the negatives you mentioned for example are false...if you go about it correctly, as @Colin_T said above.

Any substrate will compact if it is not properly looked after. I've had no more trouble from my play sand substrates in all 8 tanks over the past 8-9 years than I had with the gravel previously. The substrate in my present 40g which houses my 40 Corydoras primarily is never touched. It is about 1.5 inches depth when spread evenly; the water flow and fish activity arranges it and I leave it alone.

Plants will grow fine in sand; it is after all the closest (but safest) thing to the natural mud/soil/sand of their native habitats. It is easy to add substrate tab fertilizer for those plants requiring "good" nutrition, and it is much safer for fish. During photosynthesis, plants release "waste" oxygen through their roots.

Many fish need sand, and almost all do well over it, so this avoids problems when it comes to selecting fish you want.

I never over-wash the sand; it gets maybe four or five rinses and that's it. I had to do this when I used gravel, and with the so-called "plant" substrate I was once foolishly convinced to try, complete waste of money.

Thanks Byron, and thank you to Colin T.

looks like I will have a busy weekend as hope to put tank on line sat or sun. Buckets and hose to hand to wash the sand.

ATB

Tets
 

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