white substance around cory's mouth?

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xWarrior15

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what is this? he's also lethargic. should I quarantine him from main tank of its spreadable? And how can I treat this, is it bacterial? Here are photos of him earllier today and after a few hours when he developed this.
 

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BigBen1989

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what is this? he's also lethargic. should I quarantine him from main tank of its spreadable? And how can I treat this, is it bacterial? Here are photos of him earllier today and after a few hours when he developed this.
This looks like a secondary infection from a scrape on the gravel. Esha 2000, or something similar would probably help, depending on your other stock. Long term, changing your substrate to sand will prevent this happening.

Cheers!
Ben
 

Colin_T

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Pictures of the fish from both sides?
How long has the tank been set up for?

It's excess mucous. Is it all over the fish or only on the face?

If it's all over the fish then there's a possible water quality issue (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate or pH).

If it's just on the face then it's either an injury or the start of mouth fungus (Columnaris). Most likely an injury though.


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Test the water for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and pH.

Wipe the inside of the glass down with a clean fish sponge. This removes the biofilm on the glass and the biofilm will contain lots of harmful bacteria, fungus, protozoans and various other microscopic life forms.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week or until the water test results are in. The water change and gravel cleaning will reduce the number of disease organisms in the water and provide a cleaner environment for the fish to recover in.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.

Clean the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. However, if the filter is less than 6 weeks old, do not clean it. Wash the filter materials/ media in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Tip the bucket of dirty water on the garden/ lawn. Cleaning the filter means less gunk and cleaner water with fewer pathogens.

Increase surface turbulence/ aeration to maximise the dissolved oxygen in the water.

Add some salt.


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SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt) or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria, fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

When you first add salt, add the salt to a small bucket of tank water and dissolve the salt. Then slowly pour the salt water into the tank near the filter outlet. Add the salt over a couple of minutes.
 
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xWarrior15

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Thank you very much for detailed instructions. I'll keep them handy.

As for the cory, unfortunately he passed away a few hours after I posted this :( I figured he must have self poisoned, because I had an issue with aggressive rams and I had to chase them for quite some time to get them out of the tank and I think this stressed the poor little guy too much, because he got this way only a few hours after that.

I threw minced garlic into tank for now and did a 30% water change, hopefully cory didn't release his poison to other fish in the tank? If I should be doing anything else, please let me know.
 

DoubleDutch

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Thank you very much for detailed instructions. I'll keep them handy.

As for the cory, unfortunately he passed away a few hours after I posted this :( I figured he must have self poisoned, because I had an issue with aggressive rams and I had to chase them for quite some time to get them out of the tank and I think this stressed the poor little guy too much, because he got this way only a few hours after that.

I threw minced garlic into tank for now and did a 30% water change, hopefully cory didn't release his poison to other fish in the tank? If I should be doing anything else, please let me know.
This isn't "selfpoisoning" at all.
The Cory had different issue as Colin mentioned. My thoughts are it is substrate-related. What was it fed exactly ?
 

Colin_T

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Sorry to hear the fish died :(

Corydoras don't have poison.

If a fish dies in the tank, it produces ammonia as the body breaks down and ammonia can poison fish.

Unless the fish are eating the garlic, it's not going to do anything. Even then I don't recommend adding garlic or onion to aquariums.

The best thing to do now is a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week. This will reduce any diseases or nutrients in the water that might be harming the fish. Then do a 75% water change and gravel clean once a week after that.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

Monitor the remaining fish and post pictures if any of them act unusual or show the same symptoms.
 

DoubleDutch

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Sorry to hear the fish died :(

Corydoras don't have poison.

If a fish dies in the tank, it produces ammonia as the body breaks down and ammonia can poison fish.

Unless the fish are eating the garlic, it's not going to do anything. Even then I don't recommend adding garlic or onion to aquariums.

The best thing to do now is a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week. This will reduce any diseases or nutrients in the water that might be harming the fish. Then do a 75% water change and gravel clean once a week after that.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

Monitor the remaining fish and post pictures if any of them act unusual or show the same symptoms.
Corys do have poison Colin. They can sting too!
It is a defense system. They release it in the water in case of very high stresslevels.
The known fatal cases were mostly in the small convinement of a bag, often Sterbai were involved but others are known to can do the same thing. But the "selfpoisoning" as we call it isn't a case of "suicide" but the result of the use of a defensesystem that is triggered by high stresslevels).

It is like an octopus swimming in its own ink.
 

Colin_T

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I have been stabbed by Corydoras pectoral fins plenty of times and never had an issue. They bleed and that is it.

I have seen Coydoras spike each other in bags and they don't normally die.
 

BigBen1989

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The toxin is secreted through their pectoral spines when stressed, as DD has said. Catching a scrape from a spine isn't going to cause you any issues. I lost a bag of Sterbai in my recent house move, so I think it's a possible cause.

It isn't going to do any harm in a tank due to the toxicity being mild, and diluted massively by the tank volume, however in a transit bag it can be an issue.
 

DoubleDutch

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The toxin is secreted through their pectoral spines when stressed, as DD has said. Catching a scrape from a spine isn't going to cause you any issues. I lost a bag of Sterbai in my recent house move, so I think it's a possible cause.

It isn't going to do any harm in a tank due to the toxicity being mild, and diluted massively by the tank volume, however in a transit bag it can be an issue.

Hey Ben !!! Ben W. i assume ?
 

BigBen1989

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Hey Ben !!! Ben W. i assume ?
Hey Aad, it is indeed! How are you keeping?
 
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xWarrior15

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Thank you guys for your responses. There's no issues with any other bronze corydoras except the biggest one has a vertical surface slit (like a paper cut on a finger) vertically next to where his tail starts and a red spot under his fin which he paddles with. He's always been an aggressive swimmer, he flies all over tank glass cleaning it and cleaning floor and decor, so is it possible he injured himself this way? Hopefully he can heal without my intervention? He's active as ever, I just wish he would rest a bit so his slit would have time to heal.
 

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