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Weird algae-like fuzz

Discussion in 'Algae Removal' started by Catfish586, Nov 13, 2019.

  1. Catfish586

    Catfish586 New Member

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    Anyone know what this is? I think it's a form of algae but am not sure. It's taken over my moss plants
     

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  2. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
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    Is it laying on the bottom? It looks like rotten food or eggs. Take it out.
     
  3. Catfish586

    Catfish586 New Member

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    It's brown and sort of wrapped around the java moss. There's quite a bit and it's definitely increasing. There's a bit of brown algae on other plant tips too. I've tried to get it off the moss to little avail. Should I remove the moss and/or give a thorough rinse/possibly treat with hydrogen peroxide and then rinse and return?
     
  4. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
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    Rinse and a hydrogen peroxide dip may help.
     
  5. Byron

    Byron Member

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    That is one species of brush/beard algae. It is caused by nutrients and light. In a planted tank, it occurs because these two factors are not in balance for the needs of the plants. It may be too much (bright) light or too long a duration, or too little, or too much nutrients or not enough. In other words, any aspect of the light/nutrient imbalance can cause it.

    Knowing the light data--type, watts, spectrum, duration--and what if any fertilizer is being added will help diagnose the issue. Without resolving the cause, no temporary cure will be of any value as it will just come back. I have battled this particular algae a few times, it can be beaten.
     
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  6. Catfish586

    Catfish586 New Member

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    I've got a 55 litre AquaOne Nano 40 tank with 55w LED light. I think the light has definitely been on too much during the day and evening, so am currently reducing it to 10 hours and may got down to 8 if needed. It's a relatively new tank so I used Pro Flora tablets as plant fertiliser. (One downside being that if there's any disturbance to the sub-strata they cause a cloud!) Some of my plants have thrived; others not so. I took all the java moss out and treated it with a hydrogen peroxide solution which has done the trick with the algae and hopefully hasn't harmed the plants. They're back in the tank and look a lot healthier.
     
  7. Byron

    Byron Member

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    OK, I would definitely reduce the light duration, down to 8 or even 7. At 10 I can all but guarantee algae issues continuing. Use a timer so this is consistent each day. Getting some floating plants also helps this, and the fish will be happier (fish do not appreciate overhead lighting that is bright). You can have the tank lighting period at any 8-hour period each day (same each day) so when you are normally home is preferable to enjoy the aquarium and fish. The room must have ambient light when the tank light comes on and goes off, as this can stress fish.
     
  8. Catfish586

    Catfish586 New Member

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    Thanks for that. I hadn't thought about floating plants before. One thing I've noticed is that the green/stem plants and java moss are thriving, but a red plant (not sure what it is) definitely isn't. Would that be also down to too much light or something else eg should I consider a CO2 diffuser?
     
  9. Byron

    Byron Member

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    It is less likely a CO2 issue and more likely a light issue, though here spectrum as well as intensity are important. Plants need red and blue light for photosynthesis to function, and red is the more important. The leaf colour is due to reflected light, so we see red leaves because that plant is reflecting red light; green plants reflect green light. So now we have a plant that needs red light to photosynthesize and to reflect off, i.e., more red light. LED often fails in the red light.

    My approach over the years has been to try plants and those that manage under my lighting I keep, those that fail I forget about. If you have healthy plants you are doing well, stay with those.

    On the CO2, once you start adding diffused CO2 you are increasing the light/nutrient balance a lot. It is also harder on fish. The natural occurring CO2 primarily from the breakdown of organics in the substrate is usually sufficient. Reducing the light period will help balance this.
     
  10. seangee

    seangee Member

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    That's good advice and the way I do it. If something works keep it (or get more), and if it doesn't work throw it out and try something else. I have one tank where a particular plant thrives and I cannot grow it in another. Same water, same light period, same temp. I don't have the time, expertise or patience to try to figure out the cause, or correct it - I just accept it and stick with what works.
     

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