Unknown white fuzz on Cardinal Tetra

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Dandelion

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Although technically I’ve had my fish tank for around 7 months now this is my first fish tank so I’ve decided to put this in this thread. When I look at one of my Cardinal tetras it has this cotton like ball of white fuzz on the side of it’s body. I have absolutely no idea what it is and it doesn’t look like ich. Also to point out that one of my other fishes has the same small white fuzz but it’s much smaller and on its tail (I’m sorry if that’s not the correct terminology) Does anyone know what this is? And should I be worried?
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Playsander

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The white spot or ball is far to big for ick. I would say that is probably a fungal infection. :(
 

DoubleDutch

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Could you please place some pics of the others. The one below in the first pic seems to have something as well.
 

TwoTankAmin

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I am not sure what meds you can get up north. But it is a fungal infection likely taking the opportunity offered by an injury to get established on the fish.
Fritz Maracyn Oxy
API Fungus Cure
 

Colin_T

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Fungus. Add salt to treat it

SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), swimming pool salt, or any non iodised salt (sodium chloride) to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria, fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

When you first add salt, add the salt to a small bucket of tank water and dissolve the salt. Then slowly pour the salt water into the tank near the filter outlet. Add the salt over a couple of minutes.
 

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