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Suggestions for new fish to get :)

Discussion in 'Tropical Chit Chat' started by Jackee, May 8, 2019.

  1. Jackee

    Jackee New Member

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    Hi Everyone!
    I am upgrading to a 75 gallon tank very soon. I would like to get some cool, colorful, beautiful fish to add and I'm looking for suggestions of really cool (but not over expensive) fish that I can add with the fish I currently have. I really wanted a peacock African cichlid (b/c they are just so pretty!) but not sure that is a good idea since I have pretty gentle, docile fish right now. We started out with fish for my 3 year old son b/c he is obsessed with sharks and sea life, which is why we have pretty much basic, common, and - some may even say - 'lame' fish I already have- like Glofish tetras. But before I knew it (and didn't expect it) I fell in love with fish keeping and this is now a real hobby for me! At this point, I would like to move beyond mollies, guppies, platies, tetras....but can't afford super pricey fish. I just want something different and very beautiful to look at. Here is what will already be in my 75 gallon:

    3 black mollies
    1 white sailfin molly
    1 Dalmation molly
    3 platies
    6 Glofish tetras
    Snails
    1 amano shrimp
    1 ghost shrimp (the tetras ate the others...those things are beasts!)
    2 cherry shrimp (the tetras at the others of these too...)
    1 betta

    Is there any strategic way I could put a peacock cichlid in a 75 gallon with these fish? What other cool, unique fish would you recommend? Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Byron

    Byron Member

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    The African peacock cichlid is a rift lake cichlid, requiring moderately hard (or harder) water and a pH in the high 7's or into the 8's. Rift lake fish cannot be combined with any non-rift lake fish such as all the others mentioned here.

    Moving forward, we like to know the GH and pH of your source water before suggesting fish; some fish have significant requirements, others are somewhat adaptable depending upon the levels. You can get this data from your municipal water authority if you do not already know it, check their website or call them. For GH, get the unit of measurement they use as well as the number as there are several.

    One thing I can say, is the Betta will not be advisable in a community tank. This is a solitary fish that will be happiest (= healthiest) on his own.
     
  3. Demeter32

    Demeter32 Member

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    African cichlids are a no-go in communities. Either switch to all rift lake cichlids are keep it a peaceful community.

    What is the temp, pH, and hardness? With the fish you have now you might be able to add peaceful American cichlids such as angels or rams but they will likely eat the remaining cherry shrimp and are not compatible with the betta (I'd also move it to its own tank).

    I see no bottom feeders other than the shrimp so perhaps look into a bristle nose, rubber lip, or clown pleco depending on the temperature of the tank. Do you have sand or gravel substrate? Kuhli loaches are also and option but only in a sand substrate with plentiful hiding places. Corydora would do well too, but again with the sand substrate.
     
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  4. Jackee

    Jackee New Member

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    My pH is generally between 7.4 - 7.8. I do not know the GH at this time and not sure when I will have time to call and find, out as I work full time and have 3 children...the last thing I will be thinking about any time soon is doing that :( I do not have soft water, that's for sure.
     
  5. Jackee

    Jackee New Member

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    Oh, I forgot I have 2 small bristle nose plecos! My pH is generally between 7.4 - 7.8, and the temp is now at 79F. I did have it higher previously at around 83F. I don't know the GH. We have gravel.
     
  6. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fish Addict
    Tank of the Month Winner!

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    The GH or your tap water can be also found online through your local water supplier. This may save you ringing up.

    You can post the results on here if you find out. However you mention that you PH is between 7.4 - 7.8 and with this comes a high GH too.

    Your water is best for hard water species as opposed to soft. I know Betta’s usually prefer a lower GH and fall into the soft water category.

    Hope this helps.

    Best of luck.
     
    #6 Guppylover3x, May 8, 2019
    Last edited: May 8, 2019
  7. Jackee

    Jackee New Member

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    Thanks. Yes, I would imagine I have harder water vs soft. I looked online but couldn’t find GH. I’ll try again another time when I have more time to search. I have the RainSoft home water filtration system. Not sure if it would affect hardness but it’s nice bc it removes chlorine, fluoride, etc- everything.

    It was my understanding that a betta is ok with a pH ranging between 6.8-7.4. In the past I had a hard time getting the pH down (hence my mention of 7.8) but currently it’s been consistent at 7.4. My betta is healthy/doing well and gets along ok with the other fish for the most part. He seems to have ‘moody’ periods where he is crabby and flares at the other fish but outside of his moody episodes, he leaves the other fish alone and minds his own business. Once he has much more space, I’m sure he will be even happier. Any fun fish come to your mind for freshwater with my water conditions?
     
  8. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fish Addict
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    I would have to agree with Demeter32, and say adding angel rams would be one option, but as stated you’d have to re-home your shrimps and Betta into a different tank.

    Other than this my only other suggestion would be livebearers, who prefer to naturally live in harder water - guppies, platies, mollies, and swordtails.

    You mention you already have bottom feeders.

    Maybe Byron will have further suggestions.

    Good luck.
     
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  9. AguirreTheWrathofPlecos

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    So glad to hear you've become hooked! Only don't use that term around your fish, they might get the wrong idea! ;) I would recommend staying away from South American Tropicals as most species will require PH values much lower than what you have available to you.

    I would be looking at Southeast Asian fishes in terms of suitable tropical tank mates as is. Now, as far as fish cost is concerned, if you're going to profess to be a fish addict, act like it! Shoot the moon with complete abandon...OK, ok... so I'm merely attempting to pad my own guilt here, however, there is some truth to what I'm stating. A fish order that you would do well with are the Cypriniformes, and if you're a thrifty shopper with a little patience, you can get them between 5-10 bucks ea. If you are willing to become a member of a local fish club, captive breeders provide them very cheaply to their members via club auctions. I highly recommend such organizations for the highly rewarding family suited knowledgeable company, and fun experiences therein. I'll leave you with a few solid fish recommendations. One would be the Clown Loach which is a beautiful fish that is about as fun to watch as any on the planet. They truly live up to their name, and are best kept in small to moderate groups to elicit their most desirable behavior. Unfortunately, these will be found solely in your local pet stores as they are somewhat scarcely bred in captivity. The good news is that they are so common a staple in the hobby that most stores run "specials" on them routinely. Two would be an amazing "newer" fish in the hobby that's vary hardy, delightful to watch in small schools, and breathtakingly beautiful to behold. This is the Roseline Shark, or Denison Barb, and these are in fact bred in captivity. The third recommendation would be the red tailed black shark. They can be a little feisty so start small. Typically their aggression is towards other members of their own kind so they're best kept one to a tank. They are such beautiful fish! If they have a little space to call their own in the tank, especially tanks with "hides" and pants (fake or not) other than at feeding time when they may give a once in a while chase to tankmates, they're a perfect community fish if you start small so that they become accustomed to their environment, and other fishes. They are cheap. One last fish that you may want to look into would be the numerous Gourami species. Extremely beautiful and rarely aggressive unless spawning. My favorites are the Pearl variety.
     
  10. Jackee

    Jackee New Member

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    Thank you!!
     

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