Seiryu stones or dragon rock?

Byron

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Why call Tateurndina a gudgeon while it is a Gobiidae ??

This is why it is always preferable to use the scientific name, so there is no uncertainty as to the fish being discussed. I have had store owners tell me they make up common names to better "describe" the fish, so you can imagine how confusing this can get.

I know some (especially new) aquarists shudder at using the scientific name, but we all learned a great deal throughout our schooling and lives and dealing with the scientific name is not difficult. Most stores have invoices for the fish they receive, and these usually (in my experience) have the scientific name, and if asked they can tell you. Always write it down, spelling some of these Greek and Latin names can be tricky. I know many from memory now, but I still find myself having to look some up to be certain.
 

Avel1896

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This is why it is always preferable to use the scientific name, so there is no uncertainty as to the fish being discussed.
Agreed. Only way to be sure of what one is saying.
 
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Rocky998

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This is why it is always preferable to use the scientific name, so there is no uncertainty as to the fish being discussed. I have had store owners tell me they make up common names to better "describe" the fish, so you can imagine how confusing this can get.

I know some (especially new) aquarists shudder at using the scientific name, but we all learned a great deal throughout our schooling and lives and dealing with the scientific name is not difficult. Most stores have invoices for the fish they receive, and these usually (in my experience) have the scientific name, and if asked they can tell you. Always write it down, spelling some of these Greek and Latin names can be tricky. I know many from memory now, but I still find myself having to look some up to be certain.
Guess I got to get my self familiar with that...
 

Colin_T

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Why call Tateurndina a gudgeon while it is a Gobiidae ??
Peacock gudgeons are gudgeons and not gobies. Gobies have fused pelvic fins that create a suction cup. Gudgeons have separate pelvic fins.
 

Avel1896

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Peacock gudgeons are gudgeons and not gobies. Gobies have fused pelvic fins that create a suction cup. Gudgeons have separate pelvic fins.
I agree, but here, we're talking about Tateurndina ocellicauda that is a Goby.
 

Essjay

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Tateundina ocellicauda has separate pelvic fins, which fits Colin's definition of a gudgeon.

Seriously fish makes the comment
This beautiful little fish is not actually a goby, it’s a member of the Eleotridae family, commonly known as sleepers or gudgeon. Members of this family lack the fused pectoral fins of true gobies.


Scientific names are the best way to identify fish as Byron said.
 

Avel1896

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Scientific names are the best way to identify fish as Byron said.
Like I said too.
And SeriouslyFish nicknames it Peacock Goby, as Google, but SF doen't give Tateurndina when asking for "gudgeon".
 

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