What's new

Red Tail Black Shark Tankmates For 63 Gallon Tank

Jkings

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2012
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
I'm new to keeping fish but doing as much research as possible before getting my first tank. I am starting on quite a large one, 240 litre in the UK, which is just about 63 US Gallons, and really want a Red Tail Black Shark. What tankmates are most advisable?
 
I'd prefer not to have to worry about what I put in their and fighting and added stress for the fish so would prefer only recommendations for fish which live most peacefully with the RTBS.
 
Thanks in advance, looking forward to setting my first tank up!
 

BerryAttack

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2012
Messages
821
Reaction score
0
Location
CA
depending on the fish it self, some are very aggressive and will attack all around it. they need heavily planted tank with caves and areas where it can make its own territory. they are aggressive with each other when older and isn't advised to be with each other because of this.
then need schools of fish that aren't bottom dwellers, be really depends on the fish. usually any type of barb is good with them.
 

DerpPH

Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2013
Messages
1,189
Reaction score
0
Location
PH
Well some american cichlids know how to take care of themselves which makes them a good candidate
 

Seal36

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2013
Messages
656
Reaction score
0
Location
GB
I had a red tail black shark and when he was young he was fine with all my other fish which at the time were small tetras, barbs, gourami, keyholes and kribensis. When he grew up I'm sure he was involved along with the kribensis for killing every fish in my tank apart from the keyholes. I would suggest some bigger tank mates that can hold there own. Hope this helps from Tom
 

DanielKeepsFish

Mostly New Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Location
US
probably some of the larger gourami species, cichlids, barbs, or some other similar sized semi-aggresive fish.
 

Byron

Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
12,704
Reaction score
3,379
Location
CA
Most of the suggestions can work, as individual fish do sometimes stray from the norm in behaviour.  However, I personally feel that as one is dealing with living creatures, and providing an alternate accommodation may not always be in everyone's capability if you don't have multiple tanks, it is wisest to assume the "norm."
 
This species, Epalzeorhynchos bicolor, is very aggressive with its own species (it probably lived in solitude except when breeding, see later) and as it matures is often aggressive with other fish especially those resembling it and those with vertical stripes. It should be kept solitary (one fish of this species per tank) with carefully-selected tankmates like the larger barbs and rasbora. Bottom fish (loaches and most catfish) should not be included with this species.  Remember that this fish will attain five inches when mature.
 
Just a note on the "living in solitude" comment above.  This species was assumed to be extinct in the wild, and aquarium fish are always from captive bred fish.  So observing its natural habitat behaviours was impossible.  Hoever, if my memory is not failing me here, I believe I quite recently read in PFK that a wild population of this species may have been discovered.  But it is still too early for observations to have much impact.
 
Byron.
 

Ch4rlie

Unlicensed Moderating Moderator
Moderator
Retired Moderator
Global Moderator
Joined
Jul 16, 2013
Messages
6,743
Reaction score
325
Location
GB
Byron said:
Just a note on the "living in solitude" comment above.  This species was assumed to be extinct in the wild, and aquarium fish are always from captive bred fish.  So observing its natural habitat behaviours was impossible.  Hoever, if my memory is not failing me here, I believe I quite recently read in PFK that a wild population of this species may have been discovered.  But it is still too early for observations to have much impact.
 
Byron.
 
Absolutely, i have just recently read from Seriously Fish about these Epalzeorhynchos bicolor poplutaions being discovered, still critically endangered but very early days yet.
 
http://www.seriouslyfish.com/back-from-the-dead-but-still-on-the-brink/
 
Very interesting though.
 
As for tankmates for these Red Tailed Black Sharks (Epalzeorhynchos bicolor), acording to the same source, Seriously Fish, they state -
 
"Though normally sold as such this species is largely unsuitable for the general community aquarium. This does not mean to say it must be kept alone, rather that tankmates must be chosen with care. While small specimens tend to hide away much of the time they become increasingly terrirtorial as they grow and can display particularly high levels of aggression towards similar-looking species.
 
Some individuals are more belligerent than others and there exist reports of apparent alliances with other species such as Chromobotia macracanthus. We’re unsure if these behavioural differences are indicative of gender but at any rate loaches from the genera Chromobotia, Botia, Syncrossus and Yasuhikotakia do seem to be left in peace by Epalzeorhynchos species whereas congenerics and members of Crossocheilus, Garra and Gyrinocheilus, for example, tend to be attacked constantly. Please note that in terms of the loaches not all may be housed together and proper research is essential.
 
Other bottom-dwelling fishes including cichlids and most catfish are best avoided as they may too be picked on. For the upper levels choose robust, active, schooling cyprinids. Ideally the Epalzeorhynchos should be the final addition to the tank in order to avoid it claiming ownership of the entire space.
 
This species probably lives a solitary lifestyle and in nature would probably have only come into contact with others of its own kind infrequently and during the spawning season. These instincts heighten as the fish get older and we therefore recommend it be kept singly in the majority of cases. In a very large tank with lots of cover a cohabitation attempt might be possible but each individual is likely to require a territory with a diameter of at least a metre."
 
http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/epalzeorhynchos-bicolor/
 
 
Hope that helps a little for you.
 

the_lock_man

Smart Homes System Specialist
Retired Moderator
Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
7,543
Reaction score
81
Location
GB
DerpPH said:
Well some american cichlids know how to take care of themselves which makes them a good candidate
 
Yes, they know how to take care of themselves, but that doesn't necessarily make them good candidates. THis is because they are also bottom dwellers, so they will likely be in the firing line when the RTBS gets older and more beligerent.
 
Perhaps a large shoal of tiger barbs would work for you, or one of the nippy tetra species such as Buenos Airies Tetras. If you get them in high enough numbers, they'll keep their aggression within the species, but will be robust enough to put up with an angry RBTS.
 

trending

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Top