Intro thread

Duckquarium

New Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
52
Reaction score
19
Location
Oregon
Hi I’m new to this forum
This is my 2nd ever betta, it’s fairly energetic.
C40B21A1-E093-4143-8B04-4AE5AAFFE2FD.jpeg
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
35,161
Reaction score
18,716
Location
Perth, WA
Hi and welcome to the forum :)

The water looks a little cloudy. If the tank is newly set up, keep the feeding down to a minimum (once a day or once every couple fo days), and do big regular water changes (50-75% every few days). Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.
 
OP
OP
Duckquarium

Duckquarium

New Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
52
Reaction score
19
Location
Oregon
Hi and welcome to the forum :)

The water looks a little cloudy. If the tank is newly set up, keep the feeding down to a minimum (once a day or once every couple fo days), and do big regular water changes (50-75% every few days). Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.
I did my research on the fish but I could use some tips on growing plants.
This picture was taken pre water change last night, still getting the hang of feeding the betta
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
35,161
Reaction score
18,716
Location
Perth, WA
AQUARIUM PLANTS 1.01

LIGHTING TIMES
Most aquarium plants like a bit of light and if you only have the light on for a couple of hours a day, they struggle. If the light doesn't have a high enough wattage they also struggle. Try having the tank lights on for 10-12 hours a day.

If you get lots of green algae then reduce the light by an hour a day and monitor the algae over the next 2 weeks.
If you don't get any green algae on the glass then increase the lighting period by an hour and monitor it.
If you get a small amount of algae then the lighting time is about right.

Some plants will close their leaves up when they have had sufficient light. Ambulia, Hygrophilas and a few others close their top set of leaves first, then the next set and so on down the stem. When you see this happening, wait an hour after the leaves have closed up against the stem and then turn lights off.


--------------------
TURNING LIGHTS ON AND OFF
Stress from tank lights coming on when the room is dark can be an issue. Fish don't have eyelids and don't tolerate going from complete dark to bright light (or vice versa) instantly.

In the morning open the curtains or turn the room light on at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the tank light on. This will reduce the stress on the fish and they won't go from a dark tank to a bright tank instantly.

At night turn the room light on and then turn the tank light off. Wait at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the room light out. This allows the fish to settle down for the night instead of going from a brightly lit tank to complete darkness instantly.

Try to have the lights on at the same time each day. Use a timer if possible.


--------------------
LIST OF PLANTS TO TRY
Some good plants to try include Ambulia, Hygrophila polysperma, H. ruba/ rubra, Elodia (during summer, but don't buy it in winter because it falls apart), Hydrilla, common Amazon sword plant, narrow or twisted/ spiral Vallis, Water Sprite (Ceratopteris thalictroides/ cornuta).
The Water Sprite normally floats on the surface but can also be planted in the substrate. The other plants should be planted in the gravel.

Ambulia, H. polysperma, Elodia/ Hydrilla and Vallis are tall plants that do well along the back. Rotala macranda is a medium/ tallish red plant that usually does well.

H. ruba/ rubra is a medium height plant that looks good on the sides of the tank.

Cryptocorynes are small/ medium plants that are taller than pygmy chain swords but shorter than H. rubra. They also come in a range of colours, mostly different shades of green, brown or purplish red. Crypts are not the easiest plant to grow but can do well if they are healthy to begin with and are not disturbed after planting in the tank.

Most Amazon sword plants can get pretty big and are usually kept in the middle of the tank as a show piece. There is an Ozelot sword plant that has brown spots on green leaves, and a red ruffle sword plant (name may vary depending on where you live) with deep red leaves.

There is a pygmy chain sword plant that is small and does well in the front of the tank.


--------------------
TRUE AQUATIC VS MARSH/ TERRESTRIAL PLANTS
Lots of plants are sold as aquarium plants and most are marsh plants that do really well when their roots are in water and the rest of the plant is above water. Some marsh plants will do well underwater too.

Hair grass is not a true aquatic plant, neither is Anubias.

Some common marsh plants include Amazon sword plants, Cryptocorynes, Hygrophila sp, Rotala sp, Ludwigia sp, Bacopa sp. These plant do reasonably well underwater.

True aquatic plants include Ambulia, Cabomba, Hornwort, Elodia, Hydrilla and Vallis.

The main difference between marsh plants and true aquatic plants is the stem. True aquatics have a soft flexible stem with air bubbles in it. These bubbles help the plant float and remain buoyant in the water column.
Marsh plants have a rigid stem and these plants can remain standing upright when removed from water. Whereas true aquatic plants will fall over/ collapse when removed from water.


--------------------
IRON BASED PLANT FERTILISER
If you add an iron based aquarium plant fertiliser, it will help most aquarium plants do well. The liquid iron based aquarium plant fertilisers tend to be better than the tablet forms, although you can push the tablets under the roots of plants and that works well.

You use an iron (Fe) test kit to monitor iron levels and keep them at 1mg/l (1ppm).

I used Sera Florena liquid plant fertiliser but there are other brands too.


--------------------
CARBON DIOXIDE (CO2)
There is no point adding carbon dioxide (CO2) until you have the lights and nutrients worked out. Even then you don't need CO2 unless the tank is full of plants and only has a few small fish in.

There is plenty of CO2 in the average aquarium and it is produced by the fish and filter bacteria all day, every day. The plants also release CO2 at night when it is dark. And more CO2 gets into the tank from the atmosphere.

Don't use liquid CO2 supplements because they are made from toxic substances that harm fish, shrimp and snails.
 
OP
OP
Duckquarium

Duckquarium

New Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
52
Reaction score
19
Location
Oregon
AQUARIUM PLANTS 1.01

LIGHTING TIMES
Most aquarium plants like a bit of light and if you only have the light on for a couple of hours a day, they struggle. If the light doesn't have a high enough wattage they also struggle. Try having the tank lights on for 10-12 hours a day.

If you get lots of green algae then reduce the light by an hour a day and monitor the algae over the next 2 weeks.
If you don't get any green algae on the glass then increase the lighting period by an hour and monitor it.
If you get a small amount of algae then the lighting time is about right.

Some plants will close their leaves up when they have had sufficient light. Ambulia, Hygrophilas and a few others close their top set of leaves first, then the next set and so on down the stem. When you see this happening, wait an hour after the leaves have closed up against the stem and then turn lights off.


--------------------
TURNING LIGHTS ON AND OFF
Stress from tank lights coming on when the room is dark can be an issue. Fish don't have eyelids and don't tolerate going from complete dark to bright light (or vice versa) instantly.

In the morning open the curtains or turn the room light on at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the tank light on. This will reduce the stress on the fish and they won't go from a dark tank to a bright tank instantly.

At night turn the room light on and then turn the tank light off. Wait at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the room light out. This allows the fish to settle down for the night instead of going from a brightly lit tank to complete darkness instantly.

Try to have the lights on at the same time each day. Use a timer if possible.


--------------------
LIST OF PLANTS TO TRY
Some good plants to try include Ambulia, Hygrophila polysperma, H. ruba/ rubra, Elodia (during summer, but don't buy it in winter because it falls apart), Hydrilla, common Amazon sword plant, narrow or twisted/ spiral Vallis, Water Sprite (Ceratopteris thalictroides/ cornuta).
The Water Sprite normally floats on the surface but can also be planted in the substrate. The other plants should be planted in the gravel.

Ambulia, H. polysperma, Elodia/ Hydrilla and Vallis are tall plants that do well along the back. Rotala macranda is a medium/ tallish red plant that usually does well.

H. ruba/ rubra is a medium height plant that looks good on the sides of the tank.

Cryptocorynes are small/ medium plants that are taller than pygmy chain swords but shorter than H. rubra. They also come in a range of colours, mostly different shades of green, brown or purplish red. Crypts are not the easiest plant to grow but can do well if they are healthy to begin with and are not disturbed after planting in the tank.

Most Amazon sword plants can get pretty big and are usually kept in the middle of the tank as a show piece. There is an Ozelot sword plant that has brown spots on green leaves, and a red ruffle sword plant (name may vary depending on where you live) with deep red leaves.

There is a pygmy chain sword plant that is small and does well in the front of the tank.


--------------------
TRUE AQUATIC VS MARSH/ TERRESTRIAL PLANTS
Lots of plants are sold as aquarium plants and most are marsh plants that do really well when their roots are in water and the rest of the plant is above water. Some marsh plants will do well underwater too.

Hair grass is not a true aquatic plant, neither is Anubias.

Some common marsh plants include Amazon sword plants, Cryptocorynes, Hygrophila sp, Rotala sp, Ludwigia sp, Bacopa sp. These plant do reasonably well underwater.

True aquatic plants include Ambulia, Cabomba, Hornwort, Elodia, Hydrilla and Vallis.

The main difference between marsh plants and true aquatic plants is the stem. True aquatics have a soft flexible stem with air bubbles in it. These bubbles help the plant float and remain buoyant in the water column.
Marsh plants have a rigid stem and these plants can remain standing upright when removed from water. Whereas true aquatic plants will fall over/ collapse when removed from water.


--------------------
IRON BASED PLANT FERTILISER
If you add an iron based aquarium plant fertiliser, it will help most aquarium plants do well. The liquid iron based aquarium plant fertilisers tend to be better than the tablet forms, although you can push the tablets under the roots of plants and that works well.

You use an iron (Fe) test kit to monitor iron levels and keep them at 1mg/l (1ppm).

I used Sera Florena liquid plant fertiliser but there are other brands too.


--------------------
CARBON DIOXIDE (CO2)
There is no point adding carbon dioxide (CO2) until you have the lights and nutrients worked out. Even then you don't need CO2 unless the tank is full of plants and only has a few small fish in.

There is plenty of CO2 in the average aquarium and it is produced by the fish and filter bacteria all day, every day. The plants also release CO2 at night when it is dark. And more CO2 gets into the tank from the atmosphere.

Don't use liquid CO2 supplements because they are made from toxic substances that harm fish, shrimp and snails.
I’m using a cheap light off Amazon, it’s advertised as full spectrum and can be timed over 24hrs using mostly 2 hr intervals, So far I haven’t kept any of the settings I’ve tried I’m still working out how much light to use etc.
Im curious about the fertilizers but I don’t know if it’s a good idea to do that yet since betta has only been around about a week.
I work in agriculture at a tree nursery & we also grow hazelnuts, the plants is definitely the major attraction for me as far as freshwater goes.
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
35,161
Reaction score
18,716
Location
Perth, WA
You don't need fertilisers straight away but most aquarium plants do better if they get some fertiliser. Give the tank a few weeks/ months and see how the plants do. If they are growing then don't worry. If they are struggling, then look into getting some fertiliser.

That would be a fun job for me, working in a nursery. I used to have a backyard full of plants and would regualry go out and collect seeds to grow. At one stage I was growing kangaroo paw plants (Anigozanthus manglesii and other species) and had thousands of them. I used to give them away to anyone that came to the house. :)

What other plants do you grow at the nursery besides hazelnuts?
 

emeraldking

Moderator
Staff member
Global Moderator
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
2,634
Reaction score
3,859
Location
NL
Well, welcome to the forum... :hi:
Nice looking betta, btw...
 
OP
OP
Duckquarium

Duckquarium

New Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
52
Reaction score
19
Location
Oregon
You don't need fertilisers straight away but most aquarium plants do better if they get some fertiliser. Give the tank a few weeks/ months and see how the plants do. If they are growing then don't worry. If they are struggling, then look into getting some fertiliser.

That would be a fun job for me, working in a nursery. I used to have a backyard full of plants and would regualry go out and collect seeds to grow. At one stage I was growing kangaroo paw plants (Anigozanthus manglesii and other species) and had thousands of them. I used to give them away to anyone that came to the house. :)

What other plants do you grow at the nursery besides hazelnuts?
Mostly a tree nursery, we do jap maples, peonies, hydrangea, all fruit trees, lots of evergreens and shade trees like oaks too.
Before the outside farming season starts the bosses daughter does a ton of ranunculus in the greenhouse where we grow hazelnut starts to sell to other orchard companies when it’s empty.
I think we also do cut flowers once a year but I wouldn’t touch that with a 10 foot pole, I’m a fruit orchard kind of guy.
Here’s my “home orchard”, I have 7 more trees to go with it but they’re waiting on pots
1FBAE5B9-B54F-480F-8750-98B9FE00F6C8.jpeg

34D463AC-2FD9-44FB-8142-3E20F096CF88.jpeg

I have Fuji, honey gold, cortland, and opal here at the house.
I also grow lots of heirloom tomatoes as well as uhhhhhhhhh “tomato flower buds” 👀
And I take care of some poultry around the house here is my rooster Claudio, named after el gallo claudio de looney tunes jaja
2F37CC69-B702-40B1-B50E-0660BE534FE5.jpeg
 

Most reactions

trending

Staff online

Top