FishionistaB

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I have a 65 gallon deeper than it is long. Said tank is my pfp. How many angels can I keep in this tank? Tank is planted and has a fairly decent sized driftwood. We have some Cory cats already (about 20) as tank mates. And plan to possibly add some schooling types as well, maybe cardinal tetras but haven’t made a set decision yet. I’m thinking 4 angels? Any advice to make sure they don’t attack each other? We have some experience with aquariums but nothing this big or beautiful. Thanks!
 

Meg0000

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I think the angelfish would eat the cardinal tetra due to their shape. For the number of angelfish, in a 65 gallon I would probably get a bonded pair.
 
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FishionistaB

FishionistaB

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I think the angelfish would eat the cardinal tetra due to their shape. For the number of angelfish, in a 65 gallon I would probably get a bonded pair.
I’ve been reading that they like to shoal in groups of five or more... are you thinking my tank is too small for that? I don’t necessarily want them breeding either
 

Meg0000

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I’ve been reading that they like to shoal in groups of five or more... are you thinking my tank is too small for that? I don’t necessarily want them breeding either
I think you need 6+ angelfish for this to work I will copy something Byron wrote about that. I wouldn't get 6 angelfish in less than a 100 gallon. I think your only option is a bonded pair but I am not sure, other people on this forum will be able to help you better.
 

Byron

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Angelfish is a shoaling species and that means it needs a group. Five is considered absolute minimum, but more will usually avoid more serious aggression issues which are almost inevitable with fewer than five. Males establish a territory, in in any tank 4-feet in length or under it will be the tank space. A group of five in a 4-foot length tank is absolute minimum, but there is no guarantee. Individual fish can decide to do things differently, they do not necessarily adhere to the norm for the species. As in all animals, including humans.

Spawning is likely to occur with male/female present, and this presents more challenges and problems. Two rival males are not likely to last long in this small a space. If a pair spawns, the other angelfish may have to be removed. A "pair" may spawn, but if they do not accept each other and actually bond, the "pair" will not last long before the female (usually) is dead. A bonded pair (they have accepted each other from a large group of angelfish) might work very well in a 65g.

Tankmates. Never small linear fish, like cardinal tetras for example. Round disk-shaped peaceful characins can work, depending upon the temperament of the angelfish. Rosy Tetra and similar species. Nothing that is active swimming (angelfish are sedate and do not appreciate hyper fish around them), nor prone to fin nip.

I post this video in almost every response on this issue. This is how angelfish should be maintained, if you want to provide what the fish "expect." You will see continual nudging and challenges, not a problem here because there is a group of 11 angelfish and the tank has space for them. Though in the comments the owner says he considers this tank too small and plans another.

 
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FishionistaB

FishionistaB

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Angelfish is a shoaling species and that means it needs a group. Five is considered absolute minimum, but more will usually avoid more serious aggression issues which are almost inevitable with fewer than five. Males establish a territory, in in any tank 4-feet in length or under it will be the tank space. A group of five in a 4-foot length tank is absolute minimum, but there is no guarantee. Individual fish can decide to do things differently, they do not necessarily adhere to the norm for the species. As in all animals, including humans.

Spawning is likely to occur with male/female present, and this presents more challenges and problems. Two rival males are not likely to last long in this small a space. If a pair spawns, the other angelfish may have to be removed. A "pair" may spawn, but if they do not accept each other and actually bond, the "pair" will not last long before the female (usually) is dead. A bonded pair (they have accepted each other from a large group of angelfish) might work very well in a 65g.

Tankmates. Never small linear fish, like cardinal tetras for example. Round disk-shaped peaceful characins can work, depending upon the temperament of the angelfish. Rosy Tetra and similar species. Nothing that is active swimming (angelfish are sedate and do not appreciate hyper fish around them), nor prone to fin nip.

I post this video in almost every response on this issue. This is how angelfish should be maintained, if you want to provide what the fish "expect." You will see continual nudging and challenges, not a problem here because there is a group of 11 angelfish and the tank has space for them. Though in the comments the owner says he considers this tank too small and plans another.

Thank you for the info!! Is there a good way to tell a bonded pair when I’m looking for my fish in the future?? I’m sure there’s info out there but everything I’m finding online is all over the place and not consistent information. I work in vet med so very familiar with google not always being able to provide good, solid advice
 

HoldenOn

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AqAsvisor works as a rough draft kind if thing, I would recommend asking around here before getting to attached to anything.
 

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