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grymeths

grymeths

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From personal experience I would suggest to avoid loaches in this size tank with the other fish you are suggesting. This is what seriously fish has to say about dwarf chain loach:

Mine were peaceful for 18 months and then the tank started to experiece chunks out of finnage and injured eyes (fortunatley none missing). There is still no genuine proof as I did not gather any - but I saw it happening with my own eyes. Since I moved them into a separate tank the torn fins and other injuries stopped immediately and all the other fish are fully recovered.

It is of course impossible to blame the loaches for behaving in a way that is natural to them once they matured, but it does highlight the importance of researching your selection carefully.

Hey sean, thank you for replying!
I do love loaches for their personalities and color. I will however take in your advice! Perhaps in the future when i have a bigger tank and with other faster moving fishes :)
 

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4. Perhaps a school of corydoras (are there any difference between the different cories?)
Given the warm climate you would need to look at the specific temperature requirements as these differ for different species, and some prefer cooler water.
 

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In this case, I would likely be considering
1. 6-7 Chocolate gourami
2. Two schools of rainbowfish (forktail and/or boeseman's and/or blue) and/or harlequin rasboras/licorice gourami (if i can find)
3. A (school?) of BN
4. Perhaps a school of corydoras (are there any difference between the different cories?)

Please let me know if there are anything in particular to take note of - i do read that chocos are very delicate fish and may be for more experienced aquarists.. for example, in terms of aquascaping (plants, driftwood, gravel type) or water treatment! I do read that they do not prefer large amounts of water changes, no more than 20%.

Are the numbers for different stockings, as opposed to all these in the same tank? I hope the former, because these fish cannot all be together. You have vastly different temperature requirements, as well as activity levels.

The Chocolate Gourami are basically stand alone in their own tank in order to have the warmth and water quality. The reason smaller water changes are sometimes suggested is because of possibly differing parameters. My group was in their own tank (with the rasbora and sparkling gourami) and my tap water is zero GH and KH and acidic, so massive water changes were beneficial. If you had differing parameters that's another story.

All Corydoras species have basically identical requirements. All prefer cooler rather than warmer temperatures, none are suited for Chocolate Gourami.
 
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grymeths

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Are the numbers for different stockings, as opposed to all these in the same tank? I hope the former, because these fish cannot all be together. You have vastly different temperature requirements, as well as activity levels.

The Chocolate Gourami are basically stand alone in their own tank in order to have the warmth and water quality. The reason smaller water changes are sometimes suggested is because of possibly differing parameters. My group was in their own tank (with the rasbora and sparkling gourami) and my tap water is zero GH and KH and acidic, so massive water changes were beneficial. If you had differing parameters that's another story.

All Corydoras species have basically identical requirements. All prefer cooler rather than warmer temperatures, none are suited for Chocolate Gourami.

Hm, then it seems like i would have to relook into the chocolates, if they are too delicate a fish that are better for the more experienced hobbyists.

Going with what you previously recommended, i am still exploring these options:
1. Two to three (types/schools of) gourami (pearl or honey or green banded)
2. Two to four schools of fishes (forktail rainbowfish or boeseman's rainbowfish or blue rainbowfish or celebes rainbowfish or pacific blue eye rainbowfish or threadfin rainbowfish or harlequin rasbora or glowlight rasbora or licorice gourami or rummy nose tetra or congo tetra or zebra danio or silver hatchetfish or golden white cloud minnow or red pencilfish or golden pencilfish or a suitable species of killifish or a suitable species of barb)
3. Bottom dwellers (BN or synodontis petricola, or suitable bottom dwellers)

Decided to list out the names as you prefer. Did not include the quantity so it can all be recalibrated.
 
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1. Two to three (types/schools of) gourami (pearl or honey or green banded)

Gourami like cichlids tend to be better with just one species in a tank. There are some exceptions, and the tank size does factor in as well, but generally with the medium-sized species like the Pearl you only want one species.

If you go with Pearls, in this tank you could have a trio or a quintet...1 male and two females, or two males and three females. Lots of floating plants (applicable for any gourami) and chunks of wood or branches help to break up the space. If Honey, same numbers or a larger group, always with more females as male gourami can get rough on females so spreading it out is best.

If the Green Banded is the species Trichogaster fasciata, it definitely needs to be alone. More info here:
http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/Trichogaster-fasciata

Two to four schools of fishes (forktail rainbowfish or boeseman's rainbowfish or blue rainbowfish or celebes rainbowfish or pacific blue eye rainbowfish or threadfin rainbowfish or harlequin rasbora or glowlight rasbora or licorice gourami or rummy nose tetra or congo tetra or zebra danio or silver hatchetfish or golden white cloud minnow or red pencilfish or golden pencilfish or a suitable species of killifish or a suitable species of barb)

There is so much diversity here I cannot even begin to sort it out. You have very soft water so some of those rainbowfishes are out. There are active fish (danios, the larger rainbows) that cannot be with sedate fish (gourami, some of the others too). Some are fin nippers (golden pencilfish, Nannostomus beckfordi, will nip any fish that comes near its territory which is the surface, so this species and hatchetfish and any gourami is a no go.
 
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Gourami like cichlids tend to be better with just one species in a tank. There are some exceptions, and the tank size does factor in as well, but generally with the medium-sized species like the Pearl you only want one species.

If you go with Pearls, in this tank you could have a trio or a quintet...1 male and two females, or two males and three females. Lots of floating plants (applicable for any gourami) and chunks of wood or branches help to break up the space. If Honey, same numbers or a larger group, always with more females as male gourami can get rough on females so spreading it out is best.

If the Green Banded is the species Trichogaster fasciata, it definitely needs to be alone. More info here:
http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/Trichogaster-fasciata



There is so much diversity here I cannot even begin to sort it out. You have very soft water so some of those rainbowfishes are out. There are active fish (danios, the larger rainbows) that cannot be with sedate fish (gourami, some of the others too). Some are fin nippers (golden pencilfish, Nannostomus beckfordi, will nip any fish that comes near its territory which is the surface, so this species and hatchetfish and any gourami is a no go.

I now see. Thankfully this truncates the options available (very stressful indeed for a beginner to be looking into so many things at once). Reading forums from elsewhere also say that usually fishes that are bred locally will be fine with the local waters, which makes sense to me as well.

But otherwise, with reference to the previous list, i’ve further shortlisted 9 suitable species (at least i see). I am really looking into adding more than one type of gourami if possible, given that these are the smaller sized and most peaceful ones around. If the list is overstocked, i can do without the hatchetfish.

1. 3 Moonlight gourami
2. 3 Honey gourami
3. 6-8 Dwarf neon rainbowfish
4. 8-10 Harlequin rasbora
5. 8-10 Licorice gourami (if i can find these pretty rare ones)
6. 6-8 Silver/marble hatchetfish
7. 10-12 Red pencilfish
8. A pair of BN
9. 8-12 cory

For tank setup:
-Dark soft sand/gravel substrate, densely planted with vegetation, driftwood, rocks, caves, something floating, but also some open swimming space in the middle for the schooling fishes.
 
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Byron

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If cory catfish are intended, you want sand substrate. Play sand is inexpensive and ideal, or you can get one of the "aquarium" sands. Avoid industrial sands (except for play sand which frankly is the best you can get for fish).

Gourami. More than one species is possible but the species this applies to are very few. Moonlight (Trichopodus microlepsis) is far too large to be in with other gourami; the only time that might work is in a much larger tank, and then only with species in the same genus.

Licorice Gourami are very delicate fish, and very small. Best on their own or with fish like the dwarf rasboras in the genus Boraras. Not suitable with other gourami, though the pygmy sparkling gourami could work, I have had these two together.

Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish, a group would fill this tank with room for some smaller fish like the cories. They are too active for gourami.
 
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If cory catfish are intended, you want sand substrate. Play sand is inexpensive and ideal, or you can get one of the "aquarium" sands. Avoid industrial sands (except for play sand which frankly is the best you can get for fish).

Gourami. More than one species is possible but the species this applies to are very few. Moonlight (Trichopodus microlepsis) is far too large to be in with other gourami; the only time that might work is in a much larger tank, and then only with species in the same genus.

Licorice Gourami are very delicate fish, and very small. Best on their own or with fish like the dwarf rasboras in the genus Boraras. Not suitable with other gourami, though the pygmy sparkling gourami could work, I have had these two together.

Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish, a group would fill this tank with room for some smaller fish like the cories. They are too active for gourami.

With more consideration:
1. 3-4 Moonlight gourami
2. A school of Harlequin rasbora
3. A school of Licorice gourami
4. A school of Cherry barb
5. A school of suitable pencilfish or tetra
6. A school of Danio (probably celestial pearl)
6. A school of hatchetfish
7. A school of cory
8. A pair or two of BN
 

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With more consideration:
1. 3-4 Moonlight gourami
2. A school of Harlequin rasbora
3. A school of Licorice gourami
4. A school of Cherry barb
5. A school of suitable pencilfish or tetra
6. A school of Danio (probably celestial pearl)
6. A school of hatchetfish
7. A school of cory
8. A pair or two of BN

Licorice gourami cannot be in tanks with active fish, or the larger gourami.

Celestial Pearl Danio are another issue now, this species is not going to do well with so many more robust tankmates as the barbs, tetras, maybe others depending.
 
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Licorice gourami cannot be in tanks with active fish, or the larger gourami.

Celestial Pearl Danio are another issue now, this species is not going to do well with so many more robust tankmates as the barbs, tetras, maybe others depending.

In that case i'll go without the licorice and cpd :)
 

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In that case i'll go without the licorice and cpd :)

OK. Those were the two most obvious problems. Now that you are minus both, there is the Moonlight Gourami. If this largish (6 inches) fish is still intended, tankmates will need to be carefully selected. The Harlequin Rasbora should work, and the cories and Bristlenose. No hatchetfish as they are at the surface which is the gourami's "territory," and pencilfish or tetras might be OK depending upon species (non-active, not fin nippers, but largish not to get eaten by a 6-inch fish. And before anyone says it can't happen, I was standing in front of a store tank one day and observed two blue gourami at about 2.5 inches encircle and easily devour a 5/8 inch neon tetra in seconds.
 
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OK. Those were the two most obvious problems. Now that you are minus both, there is the Moonlight Gourami. If this largish (6 inches) fish is still intended, tankmates will need to be carefully selected. The Harlequin Rasbora should work, and the cories and Bristlenose. No hatchetfish as they are at the surface which is the gourami's "territory," and pencilfish or tetras might be OK depending upon species (non-active, not fin nippers, but largish not to get eaten by a 6-inch fish. And before anyone says it can't happen, I was standing in front of a store tank one day and observed two blue gourami at about 2.5 inches encircle and easily devour a 5/8 inch neon tetra in seconds.

yup, i can do without the hatchetfish.
 

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