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Amonia spike (one dead): Guppies, African Dwarf Frogs, Baby Platies HELP!

Discussion in 'Tropical Fish Emergencies' started by max22, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. max22

    max22 New Member

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    I have had my ten-gallon tank for at least 2 weeks and before that, I only had a 2.2 betta tank (small I know). I thought I would kick-start the cycle by putting in dirty filter water into my tank as well as tossing in some fish pellets. After about a week the water parameters read 0 Ammonia, 0 Nitrite, and 2.5 Nitrate. I got excited and put in 2 baby platies (a friend had too many). The next day I figured the platies were doing great so I went to get 3 guppies (2 female) and 2 African Dwarf Frogs. I noticed two days ago one of the females was acting very weird: not eating, moving to stay under filter flow. I tested my water each day and ammonia was a tad high, but never above .25 ppm. I figured I would do frequent water changes to counteract the Ammonia/ Nitrite. Sadly, I found her dead the next morning, thinking it was swim blatter disease I removed her. I then noticed the guppies had red gills and I then removed my betta from the 2.2 gal and cupped him for the night. I placed all the fish and frogs into his tank due to it being very well cycled with similar PH and Temp. Now my betta needs his home back, the fish living there are cramped and their old tank is deadly. I did a 90% water change once they were all out. What should I do, my other guppies seemed very odd and are showing red flag signs of ammonia poisoning (the male has a red streak on his body, the gills on the female were turning red), the baby platies and frogs are harder to tell. I plan to go get some aquarium salt and maybe bacteria booster and try to treat the guppies in their old tank. Then eventually get them all back. I'm new to the hobby so I apologize for the super long post I just wanted to get all the info and my thought out there.
     
  2. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum :)

    Do not add salt to a tank containing frogs because it can kill them.

    Frogs should be kept in their own tank. If the fish get sick, any medication used to treat the fish can kill the frogs. Frogs will also eat small fish, shrimp, snails and anything that fits in their mouth.

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    If you have an ammonia reading, reduce feeding to a couple of times a weeks and do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate 4-8 hours after feeding. You should also do a 75% water change and gravel clean any day there is an ammonia or nitrite level.
    *NB* Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

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    Adding a liquid bacterial supplement to help get the filter going can be helpful. I recommend double dosing every day for the first week, then either add whatever is left or follow the directions on the bottle. Try to add the bacteria so it is near the filter intake. That way the bacteria get sucked into the filter.

    If you tell us what filter you have, we can tell you how to clean it.
     
  3. max22

    max22 New Member

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    Thanks for your help. The filter I have is a Marina Slim Filter S15, my tank is 10 gallons. Should I put the guppies and platies back into the 10 gal and treat it without the frogs in there, or should I not treat it with anything and continue doing water changes and less feeding? I can upload pictures of anything you might need to see.
     
  4. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    The best treatment for ammonia or nitrite levels in the water, is big water changes. There's no reason to add anything else to the water.
     
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  5. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fishaholic
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    I agree with Colin. Large daily water changes are the way forward.

    Best of luck.
     
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  6. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Herder
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    Using dirty water does nothing to get the tank cycled. Beneficial bacteria clings to things and does not live in the water. Next time move some gravel or filter media over. Good luck!
     
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  7. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x Fishaholic
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    I agree with Deanasue. There’s very little beneficial bacteria in the water. Most live fish stores do tell you otherwise though.

    Good luck!
     
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  8. max22

    max22 New Member

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    Thank you all so much for you're input. I have been doing multiple 25%-50% water changes today (basically after every ammonia test) and last night I removed them into another well-established tank and then did a 90% water change. However, the guppies gills are still slightly inflamed and red and the male has a red streak that I'm fairly certain wasn't there upon purchase. Is it a bad idea to treat the water or use a bacteria booster maybe remove the frogs before hand? I can also just continue with the water changed and I'm worried they might already be poisoned there for requiring treatment, but I also don't know much about ammonia poisoning so I'm sure I have something wrong. Lastly, which would most likely die first or show signs, I have two-second generation baby platies a male and female guppy and 2 African Dwarf frogs. I'm sorry to bother you guys further I just am very worried and it's hard to leave my tank without knowing.
     
  9. Naughts

    Naughts New Member

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    Hi Max,
    Can you move some filter media (about one third) from the established tank into the new tank to help it cycle? I have found this very quick and effective.
    It's hard to know which animal would be most likely to die but if your guppies have definite signs of ammonia poisoning they will struggle. I think you have to give it a few days for the benefits of your water changes to have an effect and see how they are. Keep testing/ doing water changes as necessary in the meantime.
    Good luck!
     
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  10. max22

    max22 New Member

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    Great idea Naughts, the established tank is a betta tank therefor I have a smaller hang on filter with 2 sponges for media, I took one sponge out of the two which was probably at least 40%-50% of the media and placed it in the 10-gallon filter. Is this too much or should I keep it in for a week or 2?
    Thanks
     
  11. max22

    max22 New Member

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    Update: I added tetra safestart to the tank I have been testing water along with partial water changes as well. They seemed to be doing well but I spotted the other female guppy at the bottom of the tank unable to get off the ground I think it was either a swim blatter problem, lack of oxygen, or poor water conditions (most likely). I once again have removed my healthy betta from his 2.2 gals into a cup and reduced the water level about 25% in his tank and moved the female guppy in there. At first, she was on the bottom of tank lethargic unable to move it seemed. I added a little bit of water to quiet down the filter, however, a few minutes later she is swimming around seeming normal in the small tank.
    Side note: the guppies primarily my one male I sometimes see floating or sitting near the top of the water I don't know if this is resting or a sign of something.
     

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