White Bump on my Guppies Head

Jackss

New Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2022
Messages
12
Reaction score
2
Location
Saskatoon
Does anyone know what this might be/how to treat it? I noticed this white spot on my guppies head a few days ago. I quarantined her and added salt. She is still alive and swimming, however, the bump hasn’t changed size or shape. Any help would be appreciated.
 

Attachments

  • C0C2F98C-D0DD-4BF2-A9FF-D769BA49C00B.jpeg
    C0C2F98C-D0DD-4BF2-A9FF-D769BA49C00B.jpeg
    152.5 KB · Views: 25
  • D5A2F2E6-7D08-4AE5-A6EE-316FEFB4B065.jpeg
    D5A2F2E6-7D08-4AE5-A6EE-316FEFB4B065.jpeg
    165.5 KB · Views: 23
  • F2EBD742-76EF-4FFD-ADA8-1B8EAA94E58D.jpeg
    F2EBD742-76EF-4FFD-ADA8-1B8EAA94E58D.jpeg
    266.3 KB · Views: 27

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
36,203
Reaction score
20,669
Location
Perth, WA
need more pictures from different angles so we can judge the size of it and whether it is raised or just a missing scale.

How much salt did you add?
You want 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres (5 gallons) of tank water.

--------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt) or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate (4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will affect some plants and some snails. The lower dose rate (1-2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will not affect fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

When you first add salt, add the salt to a small bucket of tank water and dissolve the salt. Then slowly pour the salt water into the tank near the filter outlet. Add the salt over a couple of minutes.
 

emeraldking

Moderator
Staff member
Global Moderator ⚒️
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
3,143
Reaction score
4,682
Location
NL
Can't really see wether it's a hump or just a damaged part of the skin from these pics.
 

Most reactions

trending

Staff online

  • Fishmanic
    King of the Jungle
  • Chad
    Reef Tank, Crustacean, and Puffer Enthusiast
Top