What species is this

Chen jing kai

Fish Fanatic
Joined
Nov 8, 2020
Messages
131
Reaction score
11
Location
Singapore
3C5C229F-80EF-461A-8193-F99E679A308B.jpeg
C23E9E26-BFDB-4348-88DB-DEB3BFC8C72B.jpeg

Hi. What species is this? Is it a crossocheilus langei? Or is it another type? I only realised today it probably isn’t a true SAE.Thanks in advance.
 

Byron

Supporting Member
Tank of the Month!
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
18,030
Reaction score
9,554
Location
CA
From the photos I believe you have Crossocheilus langei, which is the natural species for what is usually commonly termed "Siamese Algae Eater." The dark lateral band extends into the caudal fin, whereas on the very similar "False Siamese Algae Eater," Garra cambodgiensis, it ends at the caudal peduncle.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

Fish Aficionado
Joined
Jul 1, 2021
Messages
3,559
Reaction score
3,046
Location
Cleator Moor, Cumbria
Can you define 'true SAE@? ;)
The so-called Siamese Algae Eater only eats algae as its main diet when it's young, before turning to other foods...such as the slime coats of other fish.
I concur with both yourself and Byron about identification. We used to call these a Flying Fox.
 

Byron

Supporting Member
Tank of the Month!
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
18,030
Reaction score
9,554
Location
CA
Can you define 'true SAE@? ;)
The so-called Siamese Algae Eater only eats algae as its main diet when it's young, before turning to other foods...such as the slime coats of other fish.
I concur with both yourself and Byron about identification. We used to call these a Flying Fox.

Flying Fox is yet another distinct species, Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus. And yes I can define and sort these species out. The following excerpts from my online profile of the fish should cover it, but don't hesitate to ask. First I agree that none of these are really suitable as "algae eaters; and, they are shoaling fish which means a group of five or six minimum, and given their sdize and disposition this may be problematic too. Now to the species.

Discussion
The common name Siamese Algae Eater is regularly applied to several related but distinct species. The subject species Crossocheilus langei is the one most often encountered in the hobby as the Siamese Algae Eater [SAE] and is the best at eating black brush [aka red beard] algae. The "true" SAE is actually Crossocheilus siamensis, a species initially described by H.M. Smith in 1931 as Epalzeorhynchus siamensis and moved by Banarescu (1986) into the genus Crossocheilus, and which has probably never been seen by hobbyists since the holotype [the specimen collected and used for the description] is the only one known. To further confuse, the fish described as C. siamensis by Smith was subsequently determined to be conspecific with a prior described species, Crossocheilus oblongus, so in fact there never was a C. siamensis as a distinct species, and the name now is a synonym for C. oblongus.​
Confusion abounds with this fish, beyond the fore-going. There are several near-identical species within Crossocheilus, and they are occasionally seen in the hobby. Their usefulness as "algae eaters" is variable, depending upon the species. Then there are two other fish often confused with the SAE, known as the False Siamese Algae Eater, Garra cambodgiensis, and the Flying Fox, Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus. Both of these regularly appear in the hobby, but neither will handle brush/beard algae like the common SAE. The False SAE can be distinguished by the dark lateral band that ends at the caudal peduncle whereas on the subject fish (Crossocheilus langei) this band continues into the caudal fin. The Flying Fox (Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus) has white-edged red and black coloured fins, not clear fins as in the afore-mentioned species.​
Then there is the Chinese Algae Eater, a fish that is sometimes offered as a SAE. It is much less desirable for several reasons as outlined in the Profile of that species, Gyrinocheilus aymonieri.​
 

DoubleDutch

Fish Gatherer
Joined
May 7, 2013
Messages
2,166
Reaction score
1,596
Location
NL
Can you define 'true SAE@? ;)
The so-called Siamese Algae Eater only eats algae as its main diet when it's young, before turning to other foods...such as the slime coats of other fish.
I concur with both yourself and Byron about identification. We used to call these a Flying Fox.
Think you mean the Chinese algaeeater ?
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

Fish Aficionado
Joined
Jul 1, 2021
Messages
3,559
Reaction score
3,046
Location
Cleator Moor, Cumbria
Flying Fox is yet another distinct species, Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus. And yes I can define and sort these species out. The following excerpts from my online profile of the fish should cover it, but don't hesitate to ask. First I agree that none of these are really suitable as "algae eaters; and, they are shoaling fish which means a group of five or six minimum, and given their sdize and disposition this may be problematic too. Now to the species.

Discussion
The common name Siamese Algae Eater is regularly applied to several related but distinct species. The subject species Crossocheilus langei is the one most often encountered in the hobby as the Siamese Algae Eater [SAE] and is the best at eating black brush [aka red beard] algae. The "true" SAE is actually Crossocheilus siamensis, a species initially described by H.M. Smith in 1931 as Epalzeorhynchus siamensis and moved by Banarescu (1986) into the genus Crossocheilus, and which has probably never been seen by hobbyists since the holotype [the specimen collected and used for the description] is the only one known. To further confuse, the fish described as C. siamensis by Smith was subsequently determined to be conspecific with a prior described species, Crossocheilus oblongus, so in fact there never was a C. siamensis as a distinct species, and the name now is a synonym for C. oblongus.​
Confusion abounds with this fish, beyond the fore-going. There are several near-identical species within Crossocheilus, and they are occasionally seen in the hobby. Their usefulness as "algae eaters" is variable, depending upon the species. Then there are two other fish often confused with the SAE, known as the False Siamese Algae Eater, Garra cambodgiensis, and the Flying Fox, Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus. Both of these regularly appear in the hobby, but neither will handle brush/beard algae like the common SAE. The False SAE can be distinguished by the dark lateral band that ends at the caudal peduncle whereas on the subject fish (Crossocheilus langei) this band continues into the caudal fin. The Flying Fox (Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus) has white-edged red and black coloured fins, not clear fins as in the afore-mentioned species.​
Then there is the Chinese Algae Eater, a fish that is sometimes offered as a SAE. It is much less desirable for several reasons as outlined in the Profile of that species, Gyrinocheilus aymonieri.​
I hear you and, nevertheless, these were called Flying Foxes back in my area, during the mid-80s. (Probably to separate them from SAE and CAE).
Just to confuse matters, there were also the real Flying Fox, Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus, around.
 

Byron

Supporting Member
Tank of the Month!
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
18,030
Reaction score
9,554
Location
CA
I hear you and, nevertheless, these were called Flying Foxes back in my area, during the mid-80s. (Probably to separate them from SAE and CAE).
Just to confuse matters, there were also the real Flying Fox, Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus, around.

And this is exactly why common names are next to useless.
 

Stan510

Fish Herder
Joined
Dec 10, 2018
Messages
1,799
Reaction score
1,134
Flying Fox is visibly different..does not have the big sucker mouth. The other way to tell from Siamese and Chinese is price. Siamese are expensive and the Chinese much less.
 

itiwhetu

Naturally First
Pet of the Month!
Joined
Apr 29, 2012
Messages
8,392
Reaction score
6,035
Location
Hokitika, New Zealand
Flying Fox is visibly different..does not have the big sucker mouth. The other way to tell from Siamese and Chinese is price. Siamese are expensive and the Chinese much less.
Price doesn't help much when they are in a home tank unless the person left the sticker on it from the shop.
 

Most reactions

Top