Taking Photos

Robris

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has any got any good tips on taking some photos of your fish, everytime i get to close it blurs pretty badly and its a decent camera. Im trying to get some photos of my tank and 4 cichlids to show you's.
 
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Robris

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Quick Shot of my 27L(7 gal) tank.

Its the first tank I have set up



Contains 2 x yellow lab and 2 x Cobalt Blue.

I know the tank is to small i didnt realise i thought i was just buying small good looking fish lol
 

lawrie

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do it when the room is dark, with no other lights on other than the tank light. close the blinds if there are any light reflections, tv reflections ect. its best to do it at night when its dark out side. turn of the filter so theres no plants moving, and feed the fish about 5 minutes before you take the pic, that way the fish arent swimming around too much looking for food.
if you can use a trypod then do, it stops the camera moving when you click the button for the pic to be taken. or use the timer. close ups are alot harder to take, what i do is move the camera very slowly following the fish as the pic is being taken. and remember...no flash!
 

piratedninja

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you must use the macro setting like lilfishie said
also turn off the room lights and leave the tank lights on and dont use the flash
the flash will often scare the fish and it will jet to another side of the tank before the camera actually takes the picture

ISO setting should be on its highest (the bigger the number the better the picture)
 
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More light = higher shutter speeds = less chance of a blurry photo.

Not sure what kind of camera you have, so I'll give you some additional pointers, although these are for SLR type cameras.

Tip #1: You can prevent glare from your flash by diffusing the light. My flash comes with a flip up diffusion plate, but constructing a small cover with thin white paper can also work to a limited degree. Just be careful about how hot the flash may get.

Tip #2: If you want to shoot your tank in the day time, and you are getting to much glare from nearby light sources you can use a polarizing filter on the lens to "see through" most of the glare.
 

kudv4yn3

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you must use the macro setting like lilfishie said
also turn off the room lights and leave the tank lights on and dont use the flash
the flash will often scare the fish and it will jet to another side of the tank before the camera actually takes the picture

ISO setting should be on its highest (the bigger the number the better the picture)

actually....the higher the ISO, the higher the pixelation in the picture..there may be less blur, but its only because your decreasing the quality of the photo.

(Coming from a photo teacher)

i would however trying to use the macro setting, and if possible, lower your f stop as fas as possible...this way, you can increase your shutter speed...so you can still capture a crisp photo, but without compromising its quality
 

mark.w.jones

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I wrote an article on taking photos not so long ago. Not that I'm trying to massage my ego :hey: but a lot of people also posted extra useful advice at the end of it.

Click link in my signature.

:good:
 
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actually....the higher the ISO, the higher the pixelation in the picture..there may be less blur, but its only because your decreasing the quality of the photo.
If digital : the quality of the camera will have a big impact on how badly the photo quality will be affected.
If film : the quality of the film will have a big impact on how badly the photo quality will be affected.

That being said, it's best not to go above ISO 400 as quality does tend to quickly degrade past that point (both film and digital)
 

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