Root tabs- plants question

MollyMan1

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It has been a bit since I have put a root tab in my 5 gallon tank. I have only ever done it twice and I only used one root tab and split it between all the plants. Both times I just put a piece right under a plant. I have two questions though. Do detritus worms feed off of root tabs? Is it fine to just put a piece of root tab right around where the plant is planted? I am an anxious person, so I know these questions are dumb, but I want to know. I don't want a detritus worm break out. I do keep the tank clean though.
 

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jaylach

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Can't really answer as to the worms but keep in mind that root tabs don't really do a lot for many plants, mainly such as stem plants. If I'm not mistaken your plants look like small swords which would benefit from the tabs.

What do you have against detritus worms? They are totally harmless and would likely be a food source for your beta. While never totally successful we are trying to duplicate nature in our glass boxes. Such worms are a part of nature and a natural food source. I used to see a few in my tank but not recently since I got my cichlids. I think my cichlids just ate them all.

As an aside, while I'm not a beta person, I think that yours could benefit from some taller plants and/or surface plants.
 

Byron

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From the photo I think the plants are Java Fern that are buried in the substrate. This will usually rot the rhizome and the plant will die. The rhizome is the thick stem-like piece from which the leaves (fronds as this is a fern) grow, and also the fine black roots (hair-like). The rhizome must remain above the substrate. You can attah it to wood, rock, or other decor if you like, but make sure none are buried.

The root tabs will not help Java ferns since their roots are in the water. A comprehensive liquid fertilizer might help, not easy to say; the ferns do not look bad at all, and being a slow growing plant they need minimal nutrients and light.

I agree that floating plants are essential. Bettas are anabantids, and live (or should live) close to the surface among floating vegetation. They use this to build their bubble nests too, but this points out the need for floating plants, to settle the betta. even if not for a bubble nest (though he may well build one).
 

connorlindeman

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Those plants look like java fern. As such they should not be planted in the substrate. They will rot. They need to be tied to structure and then their roots attach.
 

connorlindeman

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From the photo I think the plants are Java Fern that are buried in the substrate. This will usually rot the rhizome and the plant will die. The rhizome is the thick stem-like piece from which the leaves (fronds as this is a fern) grow, and also the fine black roots (hair-like). The rhizome must remain above the substrate. You can attah it to wood, rock, or other decor if you like, but make sure none are buried.

The root tabs will not help Java ferns since their roots are in the water. A comprehensive liquid fertilizer might help, not easy to say; the ferns do not look bad at all, and being a slow growing plant they need minimal nutrients and light.

I agree that floating plants are essential. Bettas are anabantids, and live (or should live) close to the surface among floating vegetation. They use this to build their bubble nests too, but this points out the need for floating plants, to settle the betta. even if not for a bubble nest (though he may well build one).
You beat me to it :)
 
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MollyMan1

MollyMan1

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From the photo I think the plants are Java Fern that are buried in the substrate. This will usually rot the rhizome and the plant will die. The rhizome is the thick stem-like piece from which the leaves (fronds as this is a fern) grow, and also the fine black roots (hair-like). The rhizome must remain above the substrate. You can attah it to wood, rock, or other decor if you like, but make sure none are buried.

The root tabs will not help Java ferns since their roots are in the water. A comprehensive liquid fertilizer might help, not easy to say; the ferns do not look bad at all, and being a slow growing plant they need minimal nutrients and light.

I agree that floating plants are essential. Bettas are anabantids, and live (or should live) close to the surface among floating vegetation. They use this to build their bubble nests too, but this points out the need for floating plants, to settle the betta. even if not for a bubble nest (though he may well build one).
I have had this tank and plants for awhile now. I think I got the tank in early 2022? The plants rhizome is green. I looked up java fern and I think that that maybe be what they are. Since the plants are not dying do you think that it would be fine in the substrate (samurai soil). If not I think I could plant three ferns on the three rocks. Then maybe one on the white thing under the filter (it's for bacteria growth I think. Then I don't know if the decorations are fine for planting? There are 6 total plant, 5 of them are the same thing then one is different. I will get a picture of that one to see if it is also a fern. Thank you for the help, sorry that I am uneducated.
 

Byron

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If the rhizome is buried in the substrate it usually rots in time, killing the plant. You can gently poke the rhizome (a part of it) in a crevice in wood, or rock, or use black cotton thread to attach it to any hard object. But leaving the rhizome buried is almost guaranteed to kill them, especially if the substrate is "soil" as this is more likely to compact around the roots. This is OK for normal rooted plants, but not these ferns.

We all began in this hobby knowing nothing. We research and learn as we progress. I've been keeping fish for 30 some years, and I still learn.
 
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MollyMan1

MollyMan1

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I have seen videos from mdfish tanks and he uses gorilla glue gel and says it is safe for fish. It's like cyanoacrilade or something. Also I was wondering if the roots will slowly attach and not float everywhere?
 
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MollyMan1

MollyMan1

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If the rhizome is buried in the substrate it usually rots in time, killing the plant. You can gently poke the rhizome (a part of it) in a crevice in wood, or rock, or use black cotton thread to attach it to any hard object. But leaving the rhizome buried is almost guaranteed to kill them, especially if the substrate is "soil" as this is more likely to compact around the roots. This is OK for normal rooted plants, but not these ferns.

We all began in this hobby knowing nothing. We research and learn as we progress. I've been keeping fish for 30 some years, and I still learn.
Or do you recomend the black cotton thread. I would just need to know how to tie it on so that it doesn't hurt the plant. Is there any good Youtube videos? Or is the glue better (Probably thread since you can remove it?)
 

Byron

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Or do you recomend the black cotton thread. I would just need to know how to tie it on so that it doesn't hurt the plant. Is there any good Youtube videos? Or is the glue better (Probably thread since you can remove it?)

Some recommend glue, hot glue I think. I have this thing about what goes in my fish tanks and would never do this. I've never used thread or fishing line either, but it seems the better option if one is needed. Gently wrap the thread around the rhizome and the hard item you want it attached to. With wood and rock the true roots will eventually secure the plant. It can be left floating, though that looks a bit silly, and it means the leaves (fronds) are closer to the light which usually causes black brush algae as this is a low-light requiring plant.
 
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MollyMan1

MollyMan1

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Interesting... I read online that after the plants has securely rooted itself you are suppose to cut the thread. I will go out and buy some (black cotton thread) tomorrow then put pictures on here. You JUST wrap the rhizome correct?
 

Byron

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Interesting... I read online that after the plants has securely rooted itself you are suppose to cut the thread. I will go out and buy some (black cotton thread) tomorrow then put pictures on here. You JUST wrap the rhizome correct?

Not tight, just enough "slack" so the rhizome says touching the wood or whatever.
 

StevenF

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nteresting... I read online that after the plants has securely rooted itself you are suppose to cut the thread. I will go out and buy some (black cotton thread) tomorrow then put pictures on here. You JUST wrap the rhizome
If you use cotton thread you don't need to ever remove it. It will slowly rot away. white cotton string will also work. However many threads sold today are actually polyester or some other synthetic materials that don't rot. be sure to buy thread that is 100% cotton.
 

jaylach

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I only have a couple of plants attached to deco but used super glue for this. I was a bit afraid to use actual super glue but I trust Flourish and they put out an aquatic safe glue for this. Just put a drop on the side of a plant and hold it against the deco for like 5 seconds and done. It even works under water. I have had zero issues using this stuff.

 

Boundava

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If the Java has roots in the substrate then just lightly pull up on the plants, exposing the rhizome but leaving the roots in the substrate. The rhizome shouldn't be buried but that doesn't say that it can't sit on top of the substrate.
 

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