Red Eyed Tetra

metfan581

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Common Name(s): Red Eyed Tetra, Yellow-banded Moenkhausia, Yellowhead Tetra

Scientific Name: Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae

Family: Characidae

Origin: South America: Brazil (in Paranaíba River basin) and Paraguay

Maximum Size: Up to 2.5 inches (6.4 cm)

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons (however the more room the better because they like to school)

Life Span: Around 5 years

Care: Tetras, in general, prefer dim lighting this can be accomplished through plant cover. These fish like open spaces for swimming and some Hiding places to relax or to hide when frightened.

Water quality: A hardy fish that can handle a ph form 6 to 8, however a ph of 6.6 to 7.4 is recommended. The temperature can range from 22 to 26 C or 72 to 79 F.

Markings: Red eyed tetras are easily distinguished. The fish has a silver body and a bright red semicircle over the eye (thus being called the red eyed tetra) Also these fish have a broad vertical black band at the base of the tail.

Tank mates: A community tank with peaceful fish. These fish are schooling tetras and should be kept in groups of at least 6

Feeding: They are not picky eaters. They will eat a variety of flake foods; freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

Breeding: The female is broader, especially when laden with eggs. When kept in groups, they will pair up. They are fairly easy to breed. Soft, slightly acidic water is best for breeding and lighting should be greatly dimmed. Pairs should be separated for more than a week before breeding and fed a variety of foods. Tetras have adhesive eggs, so fine leaved plants should be used to catch the eggs. Up to 2000 eggs can be laid. The parents should be removed after spawning. The fry will hatch within 2 days and will survive several days on their yolk sac. The fry should be fed brine shrimp and then finely ground flake foods. In 1 to 3 days of hatching the fry should become free swimming.

Comments: this fish is a good beginner's fish because it is hardy, capable of most community tanks and is commonly sold.

I will be trying to get some pictures of my tetras when they get bigger and once I find my camera. I hope you enjoyed this post.
-metfan581

Temporary photo link to the Red-eyed Tetra
 
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