plant magnolia seeds

Sgooosh

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Hello i got some magnolia seeds but idk how to plant it (found on the tree)
 

Colin_T

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I have never grown magnolias from seed. Most seeds get planted about twice their depth in potting mix, watered and left to germinate.
eg: If the seed is 10mm long, is gets buried under 20mm of potting mix.
Smaller seeds don't get buried as deep.
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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I have never grown magnolias from seed. Most seeds get planted about twice their depth in potting mix, watered and left to germinate.
eg: If the seed is 10mm long, is gets buried under 20mm of potting mix.
Smaller seeds don't get buried as deep.
thanks
also luckiest thing happened at the plant store

i got some little plants and when i asked if i could take some random dirty plastic pots, they said that i could also take all the seasonal plants there (they would die off anyway)
so now i have like 100 plants....
vincas, begonias, and zinnas

is there any way i can overwinter Vincas
 

Colin_T

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thanks
also luckiest thing happened at the plant store

i got some little plants and when i asked if i could take some random dirty plastic pots, they said that i could also take all the seasonal plants there (they would die off anyway)
so now i have like 100 plants....
vincas, begonias, and zinnas

is there any way i can overwinter Vincas
Not sure about over wintering the plants. you could take cuttings from them and keep the cuttings indoors or in a warm area to let them grow over winter. Alternatively, see if you can get seeds from them and plants the seeds. :)
 

itiwhetu

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Not sure about over wintering the plants. you could take cuttings from them and keep the cuttings indoors or in a warm area to let them grow over winter. Alternatively, see if you can get seeds from them and plants the seeds. :)
They will grow from cuttings
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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Not sure about over wintering the plants. you could take cuttings from them and keep the cuttings indoors or in a warm area to let them grow over winter. Alternatively, see if you can get seeds from them and plants the seeds. :)
yeah...
ill just get all the plants and put em inside ( maybe trim some too)
idk how do get seeds from vinca...
They will grow from cuttings
cool, i love propogating stuff
any tips on hydrangeas propogation? we're trying to save the species since the big one has root rot
 

Colin_T

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Hydrangea cuttings should be about 6-10 inches long and as thick as a pencil. Remove most of the leaves and plant the cuttings in some potting mix. Water every day and they take root pretty quickly.

You can use 1/3 strength liquid plant fertiliser on the cuttings and it can help more of them survive. I used to keep my cuttings in pots that were in trays (about 1 inch high) and fill the tray with a low dose liquid plant fertiliser. This kept the potting mix moist and the cuttings also got some nutrients. I live in a hot climate though so don't do this in cold or damp climates otherwise the cuttings rot.

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To improve a cuttings chance of survival do the following things to the adult plants before taking the cuttings.
  • Water the donor plant every day for at least 2 weeks before taking cuttings. This allows the plant to recover from any drought stress it might be going through and will give better cuttings with a higher survival rate.
  • Give the plant a good drink a few hours before taking the cuttings so the stems and leaves have the most moisture in them.
  • Fertilise the donor plant for several weeks before you take cuttings. This allows the plants to heal any damage and build up some nutrients in their stems and leaves. This means there will be more nutrients in the cuttings and give a better success rate.
  • Remove some of the leaves from the stems you plan on taking cuttings from a few days before you take the cutting. This allows the stem to heal before the cutting is taken and leaves more nutrients in the cutting.
  • Take cuttings during the day so the leaves and stems are full of fluids and nutrients. Plants pump water and nutrients into the stems and leaves during the day, but at night they draw most of this stuff back into their roots.
  • Don't take cuttings in hot weather because they dry out too quickly. If you have to take cuttings in hot weather, take a cutting and plant it straight away, then take another cutting and plant it. This keeps the cuttings fresher and reduces the water they lose due to the heat.
  • If you take cuttings from cactus or succulents, leave the cutting to sit for 24-48 hours before planting it. This allows the cutting to develop a callus and seal up the wound, and this stops it rotting.
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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Hydrangea cuttings should be about 6-10 inches long and as thick as a pencil. Remove most of the leaves and plant the cuttings in some potting mix. Water every day and they take root pretty quickly.

You can use 1/3 strength liquid plant fertiliser on the cuttings and it can help more of them survive. I used to keep my cuttings in pots that were in trays (about 1 inch high) and fill the tray with a low dose liquid plant fertiliser. This kept the potting mix moist and the cuttings also got some nutrients. I live in a hot climate though so don't do this in cold or damp climates otherwise the cuttings rot.

--------------------
To improve a cuttings chance of survival do the following things to the adult plants before taking the cuttings.
  • Water the donor plant every day for at least 2 weeks before taking cuttings. This allows the plant to recover from any drought stress it might be going through and will give better cuttings with a higher survival rate.
  • Give the plant a good drink a few hours before taking the cuttings so the stems and leaves have the most moisture in them.
  • Fertilise the donor plant for several weeks before you take cuttings. This allows the plants to heal any damage and build up some nutrients in their stems and leaves. This means there will be more nutrients in the cuttings and give a better success rate.
  • Remove some of the leaves from the stems you plan on taking cuttings from a few days before you take the cutting. This allows the stem to heal before the cutting is taken and leaves more nutrients in the cutting.
  • Take cuttings during the day so the leaves and stems are full of fluids and nutrients. Plants pump water and nutrients into the stems and leaves during the day, but at night they draw most of this stuff back into their roots.
  • Don't take cuttings in hot weather because they dry out too quickly. If you have to take cuttings in hot weather, take a cutting and plant it straight away, then take another cutting and plant it. This keeps the cuttings fresher and reduces the water they lose due to the heat.
  • If you take cuttings from cactus or succulents, leave the cutting to sit for 24-48 hours before planting it. This allows the cutting to develop a callus and seal up the wound, and this stops it rotting.
thank you very useful
its cool knowing that a lot of fish nerds are also plant nerds! (surface plants)
its kinda like propogating stem plants in aquarium but a lot harder, my stemplants can survive perfectly fine with one node
 

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