Plant changing colour at parts?

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AmyKieran

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My hornwort that I’m growing outside has small parts of it dark green and the rest is light green, what’s happening?

Picture below
 

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Colin_T

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looks like Elodia not hornwort.

is the plant still firm to touch or soft and mushy?
If it's soft and mushy, it is dying.

If it's firm, then it could be sun bleached from too much sunlight (bwahahahahaha too much sun in the UK) I made a funny :rofl:
But it could be too much sunlight if the plant isn't used to being in full sun all day. LOL still funny coz there's not a lot of sun in the UK
 

AdoraBelle Dearheart

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looks like Elodia not hornwort.

is the plant still firm to touch or soft and mushy?
If it's soft and mushy, it is dying.

If it's firm, then it could be sun bleached from too much sunlight (bwahahahahaha too much sun in the UK) I made a funny :rofl:
But it could be too much sunlight if the plant isn't used to being in full sun all day. LOL still funny coz there's not a lot of sun in the UK
It's also nice and cool and damp now again, so I'm back in my usual habitat and not complaining about not being able to sleep at night because 15 degrees is too hot for me ;) :lol:
 
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AmyKieran

AmyKieran

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looks like Elodia not hornwort.

is the plant still firm to touch or soft and mushy?
If it's soft and mushy, it is dying.

If it's firm, then it could be sun bleached from too much sunlight (bwahahahahaha too much sun in the UK) I made a funny :rofl:
But it could be too much sunlight if the plant isn't used to being in full sun all day. LOL still funny coz there's not a lot of sun in the UK
Yes Elodia not hornwort, it just feels normal. Is it not the plant reproducing?
 

Colin_T

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Me and my wife’s room has the thermostat. Our room was 31 degrees the other day
That sounds nice and warm, 28C is my ideal temperature but low 30s is fine too.

Yes Elodia not hornwort, it just feels normal. Is it not the plant reproducing?
Elodia just produces new stems and leaves and keeps growing. You take cuttings that are 8-12 inches long and plant them in the substrate.

If there's a lot of minerals in the water, it might be calcium build up in the stems. It sometimes happens in really hard water when the plants get lots of light, but it's uncommon.
 
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AmyKieran

AmyKieran

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That sounds nice and warm, 28C is my ideal temperature but low 30s is fine too.


Elodia just produces new stems and leaves and keeps growing. You take cuttings that are 8-12 inches long and plant them in the substrate.

If there's a lot of minerals in the water, it might be calcium build up in the stems. It sometimes happens in really hard water when the plants get lots of light, but it's uncommon.
It’s in my soft tap water outside, i add plant fertiliser every week. My big piece is about 25cm long, should I cut it up?
 

AdoraBelle Dearheart

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Is it growing? Throw some ferts or similar in there and let it grow
 

AdoraBelle Dearheart

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Yeah grew a couple of cm over a couple of weeks. Aswell as these little dark green parts growing off the plant

Ah yeah, they're just new offshoots growing then! You don't need to trim them to make them grow, they'll just do their thing and keep growing :) As long as it's not mushy feeling, and has some light and some shade, plus the ferts, it'll keep growing!
 
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AmyKieran

AmyKieran

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Ah yeah, they're just new offshoots growing then! You don't need to trim them to make them grow, they'll just do their thing and keep growing :) As long as it's not mushy feeling, and has some light and some shade, plus the ferts, it'll keep growing!
Don't cut it up, just let it grow.
Ahh cool will these offshoots just split off on their own then?

Also is ferts once a week okay? Or should I increase it

Sorry to keep editing. These plants (elodia and duckweed) are in a container own their own outside. The water is looking a bit green. Is this okay? It’s almost like a green algae on the bottom of the container
 

Guyb93

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looks like Elodia not hornwort.

is the plant still firm to touch or soft and mushy?
If it's soft and mushy, it is dying.

If it's firm, then it could be sun bleached from too much sunlight (bwahahahahaha too much sun in the UK) I made a funny :rofl:
But it could be too much sunlight if the plant isn't used to being in full sun all day. LOL still funny coz there's not a lot of sun in the UK
I made a funny :rofl: weather hasn’t been great so far for July here in sunny old Blighty to be fair
 

Colin_T

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Fertilising once a week should be fine until the plants grow more, then you might need to do it more often 2-3 times a week. But wait until the plants have grown.

The algae (green water) is growing because there is light and nutrients and not many plants to use the light and nutrients. As the plants grow, they will out compete the algae and that will let you know when to start adding fertiliser more often. Basically when the algae doesn't grow rapidly and the plants have spread all over the container is when you fertilise more often.

------------------
Elodia doesn't produce daughter plants, it simply grows long and produces more stems. When the plant has grown a lot and there are 10 or more stems, then you can take cuttings and plant them up or let them grow floating in the water. I prefer pots because it helps control the plant and stops it floating off to one side or the other. Pots can also hold nutrients that the plant can take up with its roots and this can reduce the green water issue.

GROWING PLANTS IN POTS.
We use to grow some plants (usually swords, crypts, Aponogetons and water lilies) in 1 or 2 litre plastic icecream containers. You put an inch of gravel in the bottom of the container, then spread a thin layer of granulated garden fertiliser over the gravel. Put a 1/4inch (6mm) thick layer of red/ orange clay over the fertiliser. Dry the clay first and crush it into a powder. Then cover that with more gravel.

You put the plants in the gravel and as they grow, their roots hit the clay and fertiliser and they take off and go nuts. The clay stops the fertiliser leaching into the water.

You can smear silicon on the outside of the buckets and stick gravel or sand to them so it is less conspicuous. Or you can let algae grow on them and the containers turn green.
 
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AmyKieran

AmyKieran

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Fertilising once a week should be fine until the plants grow more, then you might need to do it more often 2-3 times a week. But wait until the plants have grown.

The algae (green water) is growing because there is light and nutrients and not many plants to use the light and nutrients. As the plants grow, they will out compete the algae and that will let you know when to start adding fertiliser more often. Basically when the algae doesn't grow rapidly and the plants have spread all over the container is when you fertilise more often.

------------------
Elodia doesn't produce daughter plants, it simply grows long and produces more stems. When the plant has grown a lot and there are 10 or more stems, then you can take cuttings and plant them up or let them grow floating in the water. I prefer pots because it helps control the plant and stops it floating off to one side or the other. Pots can also hold nutrients that the plant can take up with its roots and this can reduce the green water issue.

GROWING PLANTS IN POTS.
We use to grow some plants (usually swords, crypts, Aponogetons and water lilies) in 1 or 2 litre plastic icecream containers. You put an inch of gravel in the bottom of the container, then spread a thin layer of granulated garden fertiliser over the gravel. Put a 1/4inch (6mm) thick layer of red/ orange clay over the fertiliser. Dry the clay first and crush it into a powder. Then cover that with more gravel.

You put the plants in the gravel and as they grow, their roots hit the clay and fertiliser and they take off and go nuts. The clay stops the fertiliser leaching into the water.

You can smear silicon on the outside of the buckets and stick gravel or sand to them so it is less conspicuous. Or you can let algae grow on them and the containers turn green.
So are these dark green parts more stems?
 

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