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myrtle

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Hi all, I have a 60x20x20cm tank that I'm considering housing a pair of killies in. Parameter-wise, all my other tanks are rainwater but can cut with tap which is relatively hard water. The tank is on a windowsill so will be lit by sunlight only and heavily planted. I'm unfussed by the inevitable algae as it harbours plenty of tasty morsels. I currently run 6 tanks so I haven't the time for egg picking, spawning mops any intensive shenanigans, but something which could conceivably be a self sustaining population would be nice
Being on a windowsill, it obviously follows the temperature curve of the day and the year but has a heater to maintain min temp of 20. It's crossed my mind that I might be able to use this to my advantage with annual species and allow the tank to dry out naturally for summer, moving plants to a different tank and incubating eggs in the substrate before flooding again. Any suggestions, or is this a fool's errand?
 

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Oh boy ! The things I could tell you from experience. Killifish are the most beautiful of all freshwater aquarium fishes. IMHO don't get too hung up on water chemistry right away. Unless your water is excessively hard don't tinker with it. There are over 750 species of Killifish and you have plenty to choose from. Some people have immediate success spawning Killifish. Others beat their brains out trying as hard as possible. The only advice I have for you is maintain them in species only set ups and have lots of plants . As for mops , a guy I corresponded with said choke your tanks with mops. Six mops in a 5 gallon isn't too many according to him. The idea is to have lots of places for the female to hide because some Fundulopanchax species males will hound the females mercilessly and also so that eggs remain hidden from egg eating females. Some get eaten and some don't . Good luck.
 

GaryE

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The temperature fluctuations are an issue to look at, as will be evaporation. I doubt the dry out idea would work well, except maybe with a semi annual where incubation times would be predictable. With most annuals, timing is dependent on temperature, and a changing window temp will make it a bit complicated.

I would suggest a savannah species to be able to handle temp swings, and Fundulopanchax gardneri or nigerianus would work. They're hardy, beautiful, will breed in tank, aren't especially cannibalistic and available. They can breed from around 20 to 25. Ideally, rainwater cut with tap to about 50ppm is good, but mine bred like bad ideas at 140ppm plus as well. They adapt.
 
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myrtle

myrtle

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I figured the dry out idea was a long shot! Gardneri were what I was looking at initially but there seem to be conflicting reports of their temp range on the interweb. Midsummer I'll be blocking the tank off from the window to prevent ridiculous temp increases and can move the tank reasonably easily for a few months if needs be too.
As for plants, it's pretty crammed with fast growing stuff and Ill wait until it's all grown in before adding anything. It'll def be species only too, only one of my 6 is community anyway!
Thanks both!
 
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myrtle

myrtle

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Following advice, I've opted for F. nigerianus Steel Blue, which I believe is an aquarium bred colour form. Due to the sudden drop in temperature here, combined with the postal strikes, I've opted for eggs as I didn't want to risk adult fish. I'm currently raising some Betta imbellis fry so have plenty of food on hand, a spare sponge filter already cycled and several small tanks/containers ready to go!
 

GaryE

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Getting eggs from nigerianus usually works if the nights stay above 10c, and the days below 26. Their eggs are tough, but you will lose a percentage to the mail experience. If you buy 20, 10 is an excellent hatch. It's nasty out there in transit.
If they take more than 10 days to get there, hatch rates can drop off fast. It isn't the seller's fault - it's transit conditions.

You probably have an aquarium strain. The local varieties from Nigeria are different, depending on where they were caught. I have my favourite here, from Makurdi, but others will argue for other forms, like Jos Plateau or Misaje - all places on maps. "Steel blue" means someone couldn't be bothered to keep records, and forgot what nigerianus it was. It could be a "location cross", but it's probably just a beautiful fish with a sadly lost backstory.

In my country, I wouldn't even consider eggs in Decemeber, but you are probably somewhere warmer, so best of luck. It's a great fish.
 

Essjay

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Given the mention of postal strikes, it's probably the UK. And the daytime temperatures have been below zero deg C this last week and predicted for the next few days
 
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myrtle

myrtle

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It's not Canada cold, this is the UK after all! Its warming up again next week so hoping that a heat pack and insulation will suffice. They stand more chance than live fish though. I figured the seller wouldn't ship if they'd arrive DOA due to temperature. Delivery is due Thursday but lesson learned, I guess, if they ship without heat :(
 
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myrtle

myrtle

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They're being shipped with heat on Express delivery so should be fine :)
 

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