Need suggestions for replacement filter

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be4con

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I have a 68L tall and narrow hexagonal tank. It was supplied with a top mounted external filter - basically a long narrow box mounted in the lid fittings - with a long inlet pipe that served pretty well, but the motor just packed up. It was rated at 450L/h

I can get a replacement pump motor but the one I'm replacing is discontinued and the dimensions of the new motor are slightly different, so I will have to do some sort of bodge-it job to mount it, and I am worried about rattle. I'd also like to consider a filter upgrade to provide more filtration and a higher flow rate if possible.

Because of the shape of the tank 100% internal filters aren't ideal because of the amount of space they take up. The pic shows the temporary filter I've put in until I have a better solution. As you can see it takes up too much space. That particular filter, whilst pretty good is also quite noisy, so I can't stick with it. I could go internal if there was a more compact design available someone could recommend.

I was looking at HOB filters, but the lid design makes those problematic. Canister filters would be OK, but the tank is on a kitchen worktop so hiding the canister would be a challenge and therefore isn't ideal.

I haven't been able to find any top mounted filters similar to the one I'll be replacing.

Has anyone any suggestions, before I just bite the bullet and get the replacement pump motor?
 

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If you have a small bio-load (it looks like you have just a few harlequin rasboras) a couple of sponge filters would work. They're super cheap, can run off a quiet air pump (I'm partial to these), and take up very little space.

If you enjoy your old filter, you should try taking apart the motor. Most of them are extremely simple, and the problem might be as simple as a bit of gunk wrapped around the impeller or a work impeller shaft. I could give better suggestions on how to fix it if you want. I'm pretty good at taking things apart. Occasionally I can even get them back together!
 
One more thought. Are those real plants? If you have a pretty good plant growth, and a small bio-load, you can get by without a filter; the plants will keep your water clean. Just do about a 50% water change once a week (being sure to dechlorinate and match the new water's temperature to the old), put in a small air stone to move circulate the water, and you'd probably be fine. Unless your tank has more fish than it seems to.
 
Have you considered a small air driven filter like these:

Hygger Aquarium Single Sponge Filter.
61QhPthSKHL._AC_SL1247_.jpg

They are 100% adjustable, sponge both direction and nozzle 360°, also can be stretched from 7.5" to 10.5".

It's the bomb, nothing will ever break but the pump. I'm impressed with the performance.
Installed with the sponge the lowest you can and the nozzle top slightly out of the water...

I'm sure it's more than enough for your tank.
 
I found those hex thanks challenging because of the head/lift requiring a substantial motor for the given volume.I would be inclined to stick with something that works.
Thanks, appreciate the suggestion.

If you have a small bio-load (it looks like you have just a few harlequin rasboras) a couple of sponge filters would work. They're super cheap, can run off a quiet air pump (I'm partial to these), and take up very little space.

If you enjoy your old filter, you should try taking apart the motor. Most of them are extremely simple, and the problem might be as simple as a bit of gunk wrapped around the impeller or a work impeller shaft. I could give better suggestions on how to fix it if you want. I'm pretty good at taking things apart. Occasionally I can even get them back together!
I wasn't totally taken with the old filter TBH, which was why I thought it was a good opportunity to consider alternatives. It was OK, but I felt like greater flow would be good if possible.

One more thought. Are those real plants? If you have a pretty good plant growth, and a small bio-load, you can get by without a filter; the plants will keep your water clean. Just do about a 50% water change once a week (being sure to dechlorinate and match the new water's temperature to the old), put in a small air stone to move circulate the water, and you'd probably be fine. Unless your tank has more fish than it seems to.
No, that's just a few of the fish, I have a high bioload in fact - there are 6 rasboras, 6 pygmy corries, 6 celestial pearl danios, 2 suckermouths, and 3 nerites so it's a heavily stocked tank. I already manage it with hefty water changes every 5d. They are real plants, yes and I already have an airstone. It's well established and had been running fine with the existing filter for the past 9 months with the current livestock. The tank was rebuilt last summer after a heater failure cooked the tank whilst I was on holiday.

Sadly, the motor is toast - I had taken it apart and it's not just a simple impeller issue, it's completely dead.

Have you considered a small air driven filter like these:

Hygger Aquarium Single Sponge Filter.
View attachment 340807

They are 100% adjustable, sponge both direction and nozzle 360°, also can be stretched from 7.5" to 10.5".

It's the bomb, nothing will ever break but the pump. I'm impressed with the performance.
Installed with the sponge the lowest you can and the nozzle top slightly out of the water...

I'm sure it's more than enough for your tank.
Thanks, knowing the high bioload I have would you still feel this is a good suggestion?
 
Thanks, knowing the high bioload I have would you still feel this is a good suggestion?


There must be something I don't see on your pic. But if you don't have a pleco named "Humongous" hiding in there.

I find your tank looks pretty lightly stocked. The Hygger Sponge filter shown is rated up to 15 gallons tanks, they provide wonderful surface agitation and can run for weeks and even months (depending on load) without maintenance.

The only thing I would add is to get a real good small adjustable air pump, so you can have complete control on the flow. Since your tank is pretty high you might need a little more power.

They don't look like much. But with a strong air pump like my Fluval Q1... It's turning my 5 gallon into a washing machine, even at the lowest setting, I had to buy a smaller pump, But the tank has only 8 inch deep usable.

I think something like the Fluval Q5 is a good size for your tank.
 
There must be something I don't see on your pic. But if you don't have a pleco named "Humongous" hiding in there.

I find your tank looks pretty lightly stocked. The Hygger Sponge filter shown is rated up to 15 gallons tanks, they provide wonderful surface agitation and can run for weeks and even months (depending on load) without maintenance.

The only thing I would add is to get a real good small adjustable air pump, so you can have complete control on the flow. Since your tank is pretty high you might need a little more power.

They don't look like much. But with a strong air pump like my Fluval Q1... It's turning my 5 gallon into a washing machine, even at the lowest setting, I had to buy a smaller pump, But the tank has only 8 inch deep usable.

I think something like the Fluval Q5 is a good size for your tank.
You missed my comment above to one of the other quoted answers:

"No, that's just a few of the fish, I have a high bioload in fact - there are 6 rasboras, 6 pygmy corries, 6 celestial pearl danios, 2 suckermouths, and 3 nerites"
 
You missed my comment above to one of the other quoted answers:

"No, that's just a few of the fish, I have a high bioload in fact - there are 6 rasboras, 6 pygmy corries, 6 celestial pearl danios, 2 suckermouths, and 3 nerites"

Yes, I saw it after... Your tank is still moderately stocked, I believe your bioload is below the capacity of any typical sponge filter rated for your tank size.
 
Yes, I saw it after... Your tank is still moderately stocked, I believe your bioload is below the capacity of any typical sponge filter rated for your tank size.
That's great then, thanks. I'll have a look into it.
 
They're super cheap, can run off a quiet air pump (I'm partial to these), and take up very little space.
Badger- they are good and quiet? it looks like a toy.The wall wart would annoy me but perhaps it opens the avenue of backup DC function. Is there a label on the wart?
 
Badger- they are good and quiet? it looks like a toy.The wall wart would annoy me but perhaps it opens the avenue of backup DC function. Is there a label on the wart?
As close to silent as any air pump I've ever used. Not extremely powerful but plenty to run a sponge filter.
 
As close to silent as any air pump I've ever used. Not extremely powerful but plenty to run a sponge filter.

I'm not sure, they are certainly not strong enough for most sponge filters, A marina 50 would be the minimum I would use for adequate circulation.

Even them post this on their product page.
71CFl5wCpDL._AC_SL1500_.jpg


And quite a fun coincidence. They use the exact same sponge filter I suggested.
 

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