Need a synonym

WhistlingBadger

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OK, a hundred years ago when I was young and cool (well, young, anyway), we used the expression, "Get psyched" to mean "get pumped up, get inspired, get the adrenaline going, get ready to take on the coming challenge and do something amazing." I need a more modern synonym for that idea. Help a old guy out.
 

EllRog

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In England, when you're excited about something, you say "Oh, I'm proper gassed". Might be outdated now though, last time I heard it was two years ago.
We also use it to call someone a liar- "he's gassed" or to call the lie- "that's gas"

Weird bunch really
 
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WhistlingBadger

WhistlingBadger

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In England, when you're excited about something, you say "Oh, I'm proper gassed". Might be outdated now though, last time I heard it was two years ago.
In Wyoming if I said I was "proper gassed" everyone would think I'd been eating too many refried beans...
 

Ichthys

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In England, when you're excited about something, you say "Oh, I'm proper gassed". Might be outdated now though, last time I heard it was two years ago.

We also use it to call someone a liar- "he's gassed" or to call the lie- "that's gas"

Weird bunch really

I’m English and I’ve literally never heard either of those.

Linguistically, England is at least as big as the USA. You can go 100 miles and not understand what another Englishman is saying. The regional differences in accents are huge. And they all have their unique local words and sayings.
 

PlasticGalaxy

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I’m English and I’ve literally never heard either of those.

Linguistically, England is at least as big as the USA. You can go 100 miles and not understand what another Englishman is saying. The regional differences in accents are huge. And they all have their unique local words and sayings.
South East here, not sure where you're from. I popped out of a very... Fake-chav filled secondary school not too long ago, only heard it around classmates and never teachers or other adults. Those could both be factors.
 

PheonixKingZ

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OK, a hundred years ago when I was young and cool (well, young, anyway), we used the expression, "Get psyched" to mean "get pumped up, get inspired, get the adrenaline going, get ready to take on the coming challenge and do something amazing." I need a more modern synonym for that idea. Help a old guy out.
You used to be young? :huh:

Kids still use the term “psyched” to describe an exciting feeling. I usually say “psyched” or “pumped”.
 

NannaLou

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.... Never heard that before... Pretty sure you just made that up ?
I think age and location make all these sayings pretty unique.

I live on the South Coast and have jam sandwiches, but when I used to go to Nanna’s near Edinburgh you’d get a ‘jam piece’...?

The children, and now grandchildren, use words and phrases among their peer groups that I have never heard of/would use...

I questioned one of them on the use of the word “boy” the other day; I have always thought it was a negative, racially disrespectful word, but apparently not anymore...
 
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