Medication Facts-Use and Miss-use

fishyfun&fans

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Over the last few decades there's been a worrying trend amongst the Fish Keeping Community

Medication-Misuse
Keepers are treating Fish they suspect are sick with multiple different Medications without first Researching and Diagnosing the Illness/Infection/Disease the Fish/s are suffering from

Research and Diagnosis are vital
This will ensure that you are only treating for specific Diseases/Infections solely related to your ill fish/s needs without harming other Inhabitants of the tank

9 times out of 10 multiple medication administration will lead to totally avoidable fish deaths.

Medication-Side Notes
take extra caution when it comes to choosing which specific medications to use as some medications unfortunately contain ingredients that should not go into a fish tank-Companies do this so you have to spend money on other issues that occur after chemicals in there medications have caused more harm.
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wasmewasntit

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One medication to be absolutely avoided with labrynth fish such as Betta, Gourami etc

Anything with the word "fix" in the name

These medications contain unrefined tee tree oil that will fatally damage the labrynth organ and thus slowly suffocate your fish.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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Actually, I think it was worse back in the 80s, back when all manner of chemical medications were available on the shelves. One of our number succumbed to the temptation of a copper-based snail killer.
He then had an awful time trying to manage the after-effects of countless dead snails. Today, I'm yet to see such a product on shelves.

There are medications still out there and, just as in the past, there are way too many fishkeepers looking for a quick fix to solve problems they have unknowingly instigated. (If it isn't a wonder cure, it'll be a shiny new piece of tech bought to solve the issues).
The thing is that today, we get to hear about every one on the internet. Those without problems or bad experiences tend NOT to post.

One of the huge problems for today's Doctors and other health staff is the reliance of many people on Dr. Google, complete with the staff of social media medics. It's no different for fish (or any other animal) care.
Interestingly, most people who actually DO care for their animals have a good relationship with their local vet. Seldom are vets consulted and, before people scream about costs, all of the vets I've worked with would happily advise what they know for free.
 
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fishyfun&fans

fishyfun&fans

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Actually, I think it was worse back in the 80s, back when all manner of chemical medications were available on the shelves. One of our number succumbed to the temptation of a copper-based snail killer.
He then had an awful time trying to manage the after-effects of countless dead snails. Today, I'm yet to see such a product on shelves.

There are medications still out there and, just as in the past, there are way too many fishkeepers looking for a quick fix to solve problems they have unknowingly instigated. (If it isn't a wonder cure, it'll be a shiny new piece of tech bought to solve the issues).
The thing is that today, we get to hear about every one on the internet. Those without problems or bad experiences tend NOT to post.

One of the huge problems for today's Doctors and other health staff is the reliance of many people on Dr. Google, complete with the staff of social media medics. It's no different for fish (or any other animal) care.
Interestingly, most people who actually DO care for their animals have a good relationship with their local vet. Seldom are vets consulted and, before people scream about costs, all of the vets I've worked with would happily advise what they know for free.
slighlty edited the post for you @Bruce Leyland-Jones
 

DoubleDutch

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To add to Bruces' post : I have noticed over the years there hardly is any feedback on the succes (or not) about use of meds (not only on this forum).
In how many cases is treatment with a med succesful? Even in well diagnosed cases.

My personal guess it hardly is ever in case of bacterial and fungal issues. I think 90% simply dies. The amount of died fish over the years brings tears to my eyes. Betta's, DG's, Goldfish, Rams, Angels, etc etc. an unbelievable list.

Meds and replacements are the trade's profit though. As long as that's the case nothing will change.
 

DoubleDutch

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And don't forget the meds that claim to treat anything (only not Ebola I believe) like Esha 2000.

A med with such a claim should be banned immediately.
 

AbbeysDad

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I'll confess that I have very little experience with medications. But I rarely introduce new fish to my 60g display tank and my other colony breeding and grow out tanks are basically closed systems in the sense that they all use the some water that's changed routinely and no new fish are added.
I have used Hikari's Ich-X on a couple of occasions with success I might add. Otherwise, the best medicine I feel is routine, periodic, partial water changes to keep the water 'fresh'.
Medicines are a tricky business. In some regards it's like putting a chemical contaminant into the water in the hope it will kill something other than the fish or inverts. But I have to think it comes with a cost as killing anything likely hurts others. And mixing meds can be double trouble with how things react with each other!
In any case, fish friends, use meds with extreme caution. :)
 

Colin_T

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Most vets only have a limited knowledge on fish care, keeping and diseases. They do a basic fish disease course during their studies but unless they do the specialist course as well, they won't be able to offer much information.

Most fish health issues are caused by poor water quality, and or a dirty tank (gravel and filter).

If you get a sick fish and don't know what the problem is, test the water for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH.
Get some clear pictures and post them here.
Ask for help straight away because most fish diseases and water quality issues will kill fish in a few days. The sooner you identify the problem and start treating with the correct remedy, the more chance of saving the fish.

Then do the following:
Wipe the inside of the glass down with a clean fish sponge. This removes the biofilm on the glass and the biofilm will contain lots of harmful bacteria, fungus, protozoans and various other microscopic life forms.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day until the problem is identified. The water changes and gravel cleaning will reduce the number of disease organisms in the water and provide a cleaner environment for the fish to recover in. It also removes a lot of the gunk and this means any medication that gets used, can work on treating the fish instead of being wasted killing the pathogens in the gunk.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.

Clean the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. However, if the filter is less than 6 weeks old, do not clean it. Wash the filter materials/ media in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Tip the bucket of dirty water on the garden/ lawn. Cleaning the filter means less gunk and cleaner water with fewer pathogens.

Increase surface turbulence/ aeration to maximise the dissolved oxygen in the water.
 

JennySolano

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Over the last few decades there's been a worrying trend amongst the Fish Keeping Community

Medication-Misuse
Keepers are treating Fish they suspect are sick with multiple different Medications without first Researching and Diagnosing the Illness/Infection/Disease the Fish/s are suffering from

Research and Diagnosis are vital
This will ensure that you are only treating for specific Diseases/Infections solely related to your ill fish/s needs without harming other Inhabitants of the tank

9 times out of 10 multiple medication administration will lead to totally avoidable fish deaths.

Medication-Side Notes
take extra caution when it comes to choosing which specific medications to use as some medications unfortunately contain ingredients that should not go into a fish tank-Companies do this so you have to spend money on other issues that occur after chemicals in there medications have caused more harm.View attachment 145782View attachment 145783
Fortunately, I’ve never had to medicate the tanks, but then I’m new to this hobby. Will recall your advice should the need arise.
 

JennySolano

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Most vets only have a limited knowledge on fish care, keeping and diseases. They do a basic fish disease course during their studies but unless they do the specialist course as well, they won't be able to offer much information.

Most fish health issues are caused by poor water quality, and or a dirty tank (gravel and filter).

If you get a sick fish and don't know what the problem is, test the water for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH.
Get some clear pictures and post them here.
Ask for help straight away because most fish diseases and water quality issues will kill fish in a few days. The sooner you identify the problem and start treating with the correct remedy, the more chance of saving the fish.

Then do the following:
Wipe the inside of the glass down with a clean fish sponge. This removes the biofilm on the glass and the biofilm will contain lots of harmful bacteria, fungus, protozoans and various other microscopic life forms.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day until the problem is identified. The water changes and gravel cleaning will reduce the number of disease organisms in the water and provide a cleaner environment for the fish to recover in. It also removes a lot of the gunk and this means any medication that gets used, can work on treating the fish instead of being wasted killing the pathogens in the gunk.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.

Clean the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. However, if the filter is less than 6 weeks old, do not clean it. Wash the filter materials/ media in a bucket of tank water and re-use them. Tip the bucket of dirty water on the garden/ lawn. Cleaning the filter means less gunk and cleaner water with fewer pathogens.

Increase surface turbulence/ aeration to maximise the dissolved oxygen in the water.
Terrific advice! Thanks
 

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