Journey from dining room to fish room.

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Oldspartan

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I will start this with a fact that has taken Linda and I a couple of years to come to grips with.

We no longer require a dining room. That was a difficult thing to come to grips with It was the room we gathered as a family, it is where we built science projects with the younglings, tutored them in their school work, enjoyed dinner nearly every evening, all six of us together. The room was a sanctuary that holds more memories than any other room in this old barn of a house. As children aged, married, entered the military, college, and otherwise moved away the room lost its focus. For the past several years it lost its grip on family. When we remodeled the upstairs, changing two bedrooms into my man cave, and another into Linda's she shack the dining room was lost. The room became a clutter that was only spiffed up for a couple of gathering events on holidays. Even that has wilted away with our family now spread from Dan Diego to Texas to Florida.

In the past couple of months we set a 20 gallon fish tank in front of a sheltered window on the west wall. Used to watch the sunset through that window, but no more. For the pst few years that window has been shielded by a narrow three season porch where we enjoy morning coffee sometimes and a quiet moment in the evening watching the sun drop under the mountain. Then our newly acquired mollies, at least one anyway, blessed us with birth. Linda, a true animal whisperer who has the pond fish, squirrels and many birds eating from her hand, could not abide their being lunch for their parents. A five-gallon tank immediately ensued. It was one that lay on a shelf in the basement unused for many years. Eldest daughter had once housed a Betta in the tank. The betta was part of her lessons in responsibility. Linda rescued 9 of the fry, five have survived what I imagine now where not ideal living conditions. They have grown from a pair of eyes into critters that are beginning to actually look like fish. The bug had now bit and we began to reimagine the dining room and talk about repurposing it. In doing so many memories have resurfaced so the thought of making massive changes were both bitter and sweet, but a third tank soon arrived and took its place on an inside east wall. It has fully cycled and now holds three mollies, a big black male that sometimes shimmers in a deep and velvety purple and two golden females, one of which is half black. Linda choose them from a large selection at the local fish store, a small retail establishment with a large selection of fish to choose from. We do not know what branch of the Molly family these new pets are from but we soon will.

We have decided this room with memories will become a fish room. We envision several tanks ranging from perhaps 75, maybe 100 gallons down to five. They will be well thought out and assembled with purpose. The current three are admittedly assembled from the excitement of those baby Molly fish. The fish room seems, to us, a natural progression from the pond system we built last year.

Last night, after dinner, we actually began putting thoughts, ideas really to paper. I have made a list of things to do to prepare the new room for its eventual new life.

The first project will not actually take place in the room itself, but rather the basement. Under the dining room is what used to be the laundry. Well it still is partially. The dryer has been moved upstairs, but the washer remains in the basement. Plumbing still needs to be done and that is a larger job than just the washing machine. Our copper piping is old and when working with it I will often creat a leak somewhere down the line in an old tee or elbow. I will be replacing all copper lines from the fixtures all the way back to the water tank and UV filter. That is step one. Step two is my main hobby, working with wood. I will need to add some hefty support to the old floor. I will also need to level the floor as it has somewhat diminished in its old age. This old house is more than a century old and had developed some minor wrinkles over the years. Nothing major but might as well do things correctly right out of the gate.

This would, for us anyway, normally be a winter project. We have a bog and stream to finish this spring and summer as well as a pergola at the new firepit and a gazebo overlooking the pond. However, the flooring project will begin the first week in March should take no more than a week to ten days depending on my back and pain tolerance. The plumbing will follow and that will take the rest of March. The plumbing is important, not only because Linda no longer enjoys doing laundry in the basement, did she ever, but because the laundry wall where its plumbing is abuts the dining room wall. This coincidence will allow me to put a wet area in the new fish room making tank maintenance much less labor intensive. I have found that making a hobby less intensive of mundane tasks enhances my enjoyment of the hobby

This where we start, and the finish line is way off in the distance. It should however be an interesting journey that hopefully has no end in my lifetime. It will begin today with a material list of what is needed to level and support the floor.

We are looking forward to enjoying our morning game of scrabble surrounded by swimming creatures. It will be fun.
 
The new 37 was scaped this morning. With the exception of three live plants it is all artificial. That will, Linda says, change over time. I also have a chunk of poplar I picked up from a fallen branch. It is dead and should debark easily. My experiance with poplar says it has minimal resin and after boiling it Linda will dry it in the oven for a few hours to retighten the pores. Not sure if poplar floats, it is a lite hardwood so it most likely does. I will drill some small holes into it and insert some BB size bismuth (?) sinkers if necessary.

From this

DSCN1215.JPG


To this

DSCN1226.JPG
 
Hello. Sounds like you have your work cut out for you. It's good to have a lot of new things to keep you busy, since the family has moved away. We're in the same situation. With all the cats, both ours and the local strays, the birds, the squirrels and all the fish tanks and the garden work, we have plenty to do in our retirement. There's nothing that needs to be done with the house. It's small, but just the right size for the two of us and the animals. So, we'll maintain everything for now. Please keep us informed of your progress.

10
 
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Hard when the kids migrate out, it does change life. Sometimes they reappear later. Homebuilding/carpentry was also something I did after the 9 to 5 than and occasionally as the 9-5. Happy to hear more about the reno if you are inclined, sistering joists/shimming/levelling compounds?
 
Every time I move I bring my tanks and throw together a set up. My woodworking skills are a bit like how good the average toddler is with a piano, but I put together sturdy 2x4 racks, and off I go.

I have noticed that I don't seem to get younger, and I know I'll regretfully have to gear back my tank set up within 5 years or so. Such is time. I may teach myself to drill glass and slowly build a system to simplify the work side of the hobby though.

But you have skills. What if you plan a larger fishtank, a showtank in the dining room. Before, when you're shoring up the floor, could the laundry room be made into a fishroom? You have the expertise to build nice racks, and you do plumbing. Think about an easy water change system with drilled tanks and well made racks. Then an easy chair or two to watch the fish.
A cement floor for water and for the inevitable spills... just a thought from someone else's life here.
 
Piece of advice if you plan on starting more tanks to speed up that process. Grab some Seachem Matrix and bags to hold it and insert a couple in to each of your tanks now so they have an active bio-load to jump start the tanks you want to start in the future. The longer it stays in the tanks the better. I would advise at least 8 weeks but prefer seeding my bags for a minimum of 12.

Than I would advise grabbing some Prime and Stability and using to the recommended doses for 7 days testing at least twice a day nitrates/nitrites/ammonia. You can add fish right away by using this method and I have done so with all the tanks in my fish room.


Sorry for the terrible picture and the reflection

20240222_154626.jpg



You can see i have 2 large bags in this tank and have other bags in all my other tanks as well of various sizes. Some people use spongefilters and others use an extra HOB on each of their tanks. I use HOB's and bags of matrix personally but i also use sponge filters and bio-media filters in all of my breeding tanks. I'm actually seeding a bio-media filter right now to move some fry to another grow out tank now. Long story short if you plan on more tanks start preparing now and it will help immensely down the road.


https://www.amazon.com/Matrix-4-L-1-gal/dp/B0006JLVU8/ref=mp_s_a_1_2_pp?crid=65ZY7BE7C8Q2&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.z23ny9zyGkEeydjpzPyZHt6ZOQLziwxcC1yJBVUnQjSRqArEKS0TX9G1dMb_sTxqouEQHO_ml75_2JPFj4XhXhbk2w-3WKJPBwgz6EoCx4d73lkfKtVKDaPBlhyjksmIUdRbhYvD-cOcQwDtxMGmJTHrRcAqweq72lAGcNhmGVf1PE6oPowLzYAloR_EoMpgUZbT_jeSrMNb2Sugq7hvnQ.opzcayOi84PsFaQE9xSLLtFSLFGWCUQD1RjH8MFPRR0&dib_tag=se&keywords=seachem+matrix&qid=1708645415&rdc=1&sprefix=seache,aps,432&sr=8-2

https://www.amazon.com/Aquarium-Seg...56C7296&psc=1&ref_=pd_bap_m_grid_dv_rp_0_39_t

https://www.amazon.com/QANVEE-Fluid...7PJPYVGX&psc=1&ref_=pd_bap_m_grid_dv_rp_0_3_t


These qanvees are great and much cheaper than the comparable ziss filters.

20240222_155938.jpg




Anywhoo, good luck and keep us updated!
 
Piece of advice if you plan on starting more tanks to speed up that process. Grab some Seachem Matrix and bags to hold it and insert a couple in to each of your tanks now so they have an active bio-load to jump start the tanks you want to start in the future. The longer it stays in the tanks the better. I would advise at least 8 weeks but prefer seeding my bags for a minimum of 12.

Than I would advise grabbing some Prime and Stability and using to the recommended doses for 7 days testing at least twice a day nitrates/nitrites/ammonia. You can add fish right away by using this method and I have done so with all the tanks in my fish room.

You can see i have 2 large bags in this tank and have other bags in all my other tanks as well of various sizes. Some people use spongefilters and others use an extra HOB on each of their tanks. I use HOB's and bags of matrix personally but i also use sponge filters and bio-media filters in all of my breeding tanks. I'm actually seeding a bio-media filter right now to move some fry to another grow out tank now. Long story short if you plan on more tanks start preparing now and it will help immensely down the road.
I second this advice. I've been going the sponge filter route, rather than media bags, but it definitely works. When setting up my newest tank, I seeded a sponge filter in a separate tank for three weeks, although I did also have a sponge filter running in the new tank for a few weeks concurrently while the other one was getting seeded. When I got the fish, I pulled the seeded filter, put it straight in the new tank, and added the fish basically immediately afterwards. Things have worked out great.

Waiting longer than three weeks is definitely better. I've started off with a pretty low bioload and I also have tons of floating plants, so I haven't run into any ammonia issues at all. Since you don't have many live plants yet to fall back on in case the bacteria colonies aren't large enough, you'll have to be more considerate with the process. Running an extra sponge filter in the tank is always extremely useful though. If you need to unexpectedly set up a quarantine tank, you have a way to instantly cycle it. An extra HOB could do the same, but sponge filters can be a bit more portable.
 
Every time I move I bring my tanks and throw together a set up. My woodworking skills are a bit like how good the average toddler is with a piano, but I put together sturdy 2x4 racks, and off I go.

I have noticed that I don't seem to get younger, and I know I'll regretfully have to gear back my tank set up within 5 years or so. Such is time. I may teach myself to drill glass and slowly build a system to simplify the work side of the hobby though.

But you have skills. What if you plan a larger fishtank, a showtank in the dining room. Before, when you're shoring up the floor, could the laundry room be made into a fishroom? You have the expertise to build nice racks, and you do plumbing. Think about an easy water change system with drilled tanks and well made racks. Then an easy chair or two to watch the fish.
A cement floor for water and for the inevitable spills... just a thought from someone else's life here.
Good thoughts. The laundry room will remain as a laundry room if I wish to remain married. However, the goal is to build cabinet grade racking to hold tanks on facing walls. One will definitely be in the pass through between kitchen and new fish room and that will be the show tank. The plumbing will be on the wall that abuts the laundry. I picture a wet area with sink and drain. I also, subject to change expect to pipe water to the tank areas so to ease water additions to the tank. I will definitely use a washing machine mixing valve in the system so that I have tempered water. Tank draining will likely be done with a small laundry pump with connections on the walls. The walls will be covered in a water resistant something akin to what is used in restaurant kitchens but with a bit more style. Carpet will have to be removed and replaced with something. Have not a clue what at this stage.

Cabinets and tank racks will be made with a combination of light and dark hardwood. I have maple, cherry, ash, and butternut on hand. Can also make a trade for black walnut if we choose that. Wood on hand will need to go to a dry kiln though. There is one about 35 miles from me who is reasonable.

Anyway, that is the broad stroke, and I am sure there will be some changes between shoring up the basement and actual crafting.

I am excited to begin but have to be careful not to get ahead of myself. There is several weeks of work in front of us outside once the weather breaks. It is heck to age. What I used to do in a day now takes three. Better than the alternative though.
 
Piece of advice if you plan on starting more tanks to speed up that process. Grab some Seachem Matrix and bags to hold it and insert a couple in to each of your tanks now so they have an active bio-load to jump start the tanks you want to start in the future. The longer it stays in the tanks the better. I would advise at least 8 weeks but prefer seeding my bags for a minimum of 12.

Than I would advise grabbing some Prime and Stability and using to the recommended doses for 7 days testing at least twice a day nitrates/nitrites/ammonia. You can add fish right away by using this method and I have done so with all the tanks in my fish room.


Sorry for the terrible picture and the reflection

View attachment 337384


You can see i have 2 large bags in this tank and have other bags in all my other tanks as well of various sizes. Some people use spongefilters and others use an extra HOB on each of their tanks. I use HOB's and bags of matrix personally but i also use sponge filters and bio-media filters in all of my breeding tanks. I'm actually seeding a bio-media filter right now to move some fry to another grow out tank now. Long story short if you plan on more tanks start preparing now and it will help immensely down the road.


https://www.amazon.com/Matrix-4-L-1-gal/dp/B0006JLVU8/ref=mp_s_a_1_2_pp?crid=65ZY7BE7C8Q2&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.z23ny9zyGkEeydjpzPyZHt6ZOQLziwxcC1yJBVUnQjSRqArEKS0TX9G1dMb_sTxqouEQHO_ml75_2JPFj4XhXhbk2w-3WKJPBwgz6EoCx4d73lkfKtVKDaPBlhyjksmIUdRbhYvD-cOcQwDtxMGmJTHrRcAqweq72lAGcNhmGVf1PE6oPowLzYAloR_EoMpgUZbT_jeSrMNb2Sugq7hvnQ.opzcayOi84PsFaQE9xSLLtFSLFGWCUQD1RjH8MFPRR0&dib_tag=se&keywords=seachem+matrix&qid=1708645415&rdc=1&sprefix=seache,aps,432&sr=8-2

https://www.amazon.com/Aquarium-Seg...56C7296&psc=1&ref_=pd_bap_m_grid_dv_rp_0_39_t

https://www.amazon.com/QANVEE-Fluid...7PJPYVGX&psc=1&ref_=pd_bap_m_grid_dv_rp_0_3_t


These qanvees are great and much cheaper than the comparable ziss filters.

View attachment 337385



Anywhoo, good luck and keep us updated!
Thank You for the tip.
 
Started at dawn today. The sap run is pretty good and very early. Drew about 7 gallons from the two tanks. Put it in the walkout part of the basement and will get the turkey fryer out later today and set up. The first draw is used for smoked rye beer and will bet about 5 gallons, or 30 22-ounce bottles. I bottle rather than keg this batch.

While I was doing that Linda cleaned algae from the 37. It was unattractive and seemed to be building fast. Was just a smudge a couple of days ago. Probably have the light on to much and Linda is doing some book learning about the issue while relaxing.

Today I am going to pick through my wood stash for some suitable hemlock 4 by 4's. I have several left from a small retaining wall project two years ago. The properly sticked so hopeful it has not twisted. Called my brother last night and asked him to mill some 2 by 10 hemlock, he has a small sawmill. These will be used to sister half dozen or so floor joists under the dining room, AKA new fish room. I will go get them next weekend and beg an Italian dinner while there. His wife cooks a mean lasagna. That order was placed right after the wood order. Linda and I will supple some nice mellow mead.

When looking the basement work over I realized I have wires that will be in the way of the sisters. This is a problem because the one trade I will not do is electrical. I practically turn the main off to change a light bulb. There is a reason for my fear, but that is a story for another day.

Anyway, once the sisters are in I will build a false wall and new support beam and the shore up should suffice. The uneven floor does not look as bad as I envisioned. It appears to be mostly caused by a couple of very weak floor joists. Looks like I will need to raise them by maybe 1/2 inch. The floor itself is double 1 by6's and 8's and they appear to be true. So, some of the prep work will not be necessary.

My new concern is electricity. The dining room shares a 15-amp circuit with the three-season porch. The pond power comes from the porch with an RV grade extension cord which feeds a 15-amp power bar. I have a 40-amp sub feed beneath the laundry that powers our dryer and will also power the washer when I move it from the basement. My buddy will run a circuit from that for the pond and gazebo once i have built the gazebo. That is a priority project for late march early April depending on weather. When done the outside load from the porch-future fish room will be relieved, BUT, it is still a 15-amp circuit so I do not know if it will adequate. Not certain what the electric load is of mutiple fish tanks. Do not even know what tanks we will install yet outside of a large tank to fill the pass through. I will start doing sketches on the next miserable day though.

Seems the more we think about this project the more involved it gets. That does not discourage me at all.

It is a lovely morning and the temps here are predicted to rise into the 40's so it is time to backburner these thoughts and assemble the boil down stuff. I will reduce the sap by about 25% then start the beer making process. Should have about 6 gallons fermenting before dinner.
 
Temps never made it to 40’s as local weather lady predicted. More like 32 with gusty winds. Still got the sap reduced and into fermentation.

My piece poplar was debarked and given to Linda. She wire brushed, boiled it, again and then again. Into the oven 2 hours at a low temp. Then boiled once again and no brown water. Back to the oven to dry again.

As suspected it floated. My idea of drilling and adding bismuth bb’s was mixed. Linda wanted it held by an inconspicuous rock. A piece of granite she had already cleaned and boiled. So as I awaited my evening feeding I whittled the rock into the poplar. It is a tight fit and was put in place with a gentle pounding with a tack hammer. After dinner I took a torch to and gave it a light burnishing. This process should deter decomp.

Into the tank and we are pleased. The 3 Molly were exploring it and also seem pleased. Linda claims the big black she named Charlie wagged its tail at her. Who knows, maybe he did. She is my animal whisperer after all.

Today we will bring the Hemlock 4 by 4 into the basement to acclimate and I will remodel the drainage system for both the new fish room and washing machine. The goal is to complete the laundry by weeks end so that I can concentrate on roughing out the fish room piping and Chris can do whatever electrical is required. Need to research what the electrical load will be when fully comlete.

I believe we will need to power a 75, two 29, and two 15 on the north wall. On the south wall the 37, two 40 and two 20 . This will not be overnight and is a long term project, if there is really such a thing at my age. Experience tells me to get the mechanicals right at the start so that the process goes smoothly.

Sorry, well not really for the length. I enjoy writing and the process of doing so keeps me centered on my goals.
 
I'm also very cautious with electricity. I too have a story there.
I have a huge fishroom - 40% of a double garage out back. I got an electrician in, and bit the bullet on the cost. I needed a hot water heater and baseboard heaters, and set up 2 15 amp lines for the tanks.
With all my tanks in one room, I filter via a central air pump, and only use heaters for one tank. I spent in set up, and that room is seriously insulated. I'm surprised at how little I spend on electricity out there. I had budgeted for much more.
The main use of my electrical outlets is lights, and with LEDS all around, that doesn't cost a fortune. If I had a redo though, I would have put in a system for humidity. In the tightly insulated room, it can build over the winter months. The dehumidifier costs to run.
When it warms, I run open window screened fans, reinforced in case the raccoons or a wandering bear smell fish life.

I stopped brewing years ago. But that beer of yours sounds really intriguing.
 
Yesterday, Sunday, was busy. Did water changes on the three tanks, about 35% on each while vacuuming the gravel with my new electric Fluval gravel vacuum. The vacuum worked great and was everything I hoped it would be. After church we loaded the 12-foot maple log and about 300 board feet of butternut and hemlock onto my friend's flatbed. The hemlock was taken in trade by a local sawmill in exchange for 120 board feet of Black Walnut. The Maple log, Butternut and Black Maple was then taken to another mill about 40 miles away that also has a kiln. They will say the Maple into 1,75 thick boards of various widths then put the three woods into the kiln. I will not see the wood again until June. I normally have my brother saw my logs but it is worth the extra money to save the extra trip. The Maple will be used as for counter surface after being milled, by me into 5/4 by 12 foot. The Black walnut and butternut, all an inch thick will be used for exposed frame and trim and accents after it is milled to 3/4". While all this was being done Linda took the pick up down the road where we had discovered a pile of about a dozen pallets. We are going to build a fence to enclose the side yard where the pond is and extend the dog yard into that area. It will take about 50 of them in total.

Anyway, onto the fish. I did water tests early Sunday. The 37 and 20 were all good. The 5 however had an alarming Nitrite spike that took place in the 2 days from the last test. Took out 2 1/2 gallons and vacuumed the substrate vigorously after removing all decorations. Will be testing it again this morning. We did not lose any of the fry which are growing very wll, (I think anyway).

Today it is supposed to be in the high 40's, maybe low 50:s with minimal wind so we will concentrate on removing and burning bamboo. That is part of finishing the pond project and where many of the pallet fence will be installed. While the bamboo is burning, I am going to lay out the Gazebo and pergola as well as the walkways.

Last night we began sketching the new fish room in earnest. I now know exactly where to place the supports in the basement. That will be a job for the next few inclement weather days. I cannot actually do plumbing work until the wood working is done. All the material is neatly stacked. Chris is calculating the electrical load I require for the pond area and new fish room. I expect to have the material list shortly and he has promised a weekend in March to do the electrical roughout. I expect the basement part of mechanicals should be somewhat complete by the end of March as well as the washer moved and plumbed upstairs. Linda will be happy about that.

Come April the fish room stuff will need to take a backseat to the outside stuff. That will be fine because I will be awaiting the kilned wood.

Friday we plan to go to the fish store to acquire a pair of Angelfish for the 37. The water seems stable, and the three Molly are doing very well. The week after the Angels we plan on adding three Swordtails and a week later a Bristlenose. I think that should be complete although Linda also wants to add 6 or 8 Neon. She usually gets what she wants but I do not want to overpopulate.

Going to have to develop a budget for all this sooner not later. Wood is fortunately not a major expense and labor is measured in time rather than dollars. However mechanicals, tanks, fish, decor and equipment will all add up, I think. Cost will drive the schedule as usual. That is the biggest drawback to being retired. Time is cheap but material is not.
 
Pouring rain and 40 MPH wind gusts this morning although it has tailed off. Not a day for outside work.

Yesterday got one area of 250 squre feet and another about 175 square feet cleared of bamboo and the bamboo burned in the firepit. Our shoulders are sour and only half done. This will really open the pond area though.

This morning we finally finalized how the new fish room will look. The south wall, interior), will have 104 inches of linear tank area. The north wall, again interior will have 116 inches. In the center of the north wall is a pass through that I will TRY to build a tank for so that Linda can enjoy it while in the kitchen. Each of those walls could have a four-and-a-half-foot elbow (that would include the 25 inch width of each north and south counter), to the east wall which abuts the laundry room plumbing. The center of the east wall will be opened up into a closet that uses 30" of the laundry with.

Here is where I am seeking some suggestions.

1. Inside that "closet I want a small pump that can be used to take water from tanks. I will put 3/4" PVV in a soffit above the counters that can be used as main drain lines. With this pump location I can drain directly to the kit/laundry drywell.

2. A second CPVC line will be run in the soffit for water supply. It will come from an electric RV water heater, also in the closet. I already own the electric heater which is 7.5 gallons I think and set at 120 degrees. A washer mixing valve will temper its output and should allow me about 25 gallons before it needs to rest. Might even be able to double that by using a 20 gallon tempering tank if there is room. Also have a glass lined 20 so no cost there. Space will be the determining factor.

3. TANKS? Linda wants one large community tank in the pass through. I am very queasy about the build but willing to try. I can only imagine the two room mess in the event of failure. Going to experiment with a smaller edition soon, maybe 24 by 15 by 15 tall. I have some ideas on building a jig but still have concerns. ANYWAY:

Although I understand the tanks are largely a personal choice we have little experience and in honesty are jumping in with both feet. having lots of courage and little knowledge.

Each tank should have a purpose. Species specific with the exception of the tank in the pass through and perhaps another on the opposite wall, I am thinking 48". Also want a tank, maybe two for fry. Linda is enthralled with Molly and also likes guppies. I want a smallish but comfortable tank for a Betta. We are leaning toward artificial plants because I want to limit extraneous maintenance. The pets are the main thrust.

I would appreciate any input possible on both the plumbing, filtration, stock and anything else, including any books somebody might recommend.

We do not want to kill pets out of ignorance. We do not want to add pets that are beyond our ability care for. We want to give each their best life just like we do with our dogs, cats and bird.
 
Chris came over with my electical material list. He has told me I need to either upgrade the sub feed box that feed the laundry room with 8 wire or run another sub feed with 10 wire. I will do the new box. Will be doing some shopping this week for this. I try very hard to buy from mom and pop shops even when the prices are a touch more. However, there is no mom-and-pop electrical store nearby anymore so it will be online shopping for best prices. Chris wants to do the work the first week in April when he has some free time. My job is to run the wires I am comfortable running which is pretty much anything that is not connected to power. Have to get the support work done first. It will be nice to have the pond area on its own circuit this summer instead of using lead cords. The new fish room will have two separate circuits, one for the tanks, and a second for water heater and pump. Those will just be tails in the laundry room initially. Linda does not want holes in wall that are not going to be completed for a few months.

Happy wife, happy life.

Found snails in the 37 this morning. Not to excited about that and can only guess they hitched a ride on some plants Linda added.

Picking up our angelfish on Sunday. They were not ready to leave the fish shop on Friday.

Blustery cold today and I am sitting here waiting for the tree guy. Need several trees taken down that are endangering the house and driveway in this new normal of what seems like constant wind. Had a big Maple come down last year that nicked my house and truck. No house damage and just a dent in the truck bumper. He will do the work in exchange for the logs with any luck. May have to let him do some cuts in the backwoods to shore up the deal.

Maple sap has pretty much stopped running due to the cold days and nights. That should change beginning tomorrow. and next week.

This is a fish forum so I am probably stretching the mods patience so I will end by saying we are picking up a used 29-gallon tank later today, or I should say Linda is. I want to put it on the work bench to closely examine construction before attempting to build a practice tank. BUT, if the price of this tank is an indication of used tank prices I may discard any thought of building my own.
 

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