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Help: Gouramis and Guppies / Tank size

Discussion in 'Gouramis and Anabantoids' started by Róisín, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. Róisín

    Róisín New Member

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    Hi, so basically I’m very new to having fish, I had them when I was younger but I didn’t understand all the responsibility. I’m getting fish again and I’m planning to get 2 gouramis and some guppies but I definitely need help. Originally, I knew I didn’t want 1 because they get really shy and quiet so I thought that 2 male gouramis would be okay but I’ve read that they could fight and I’d be so scared if they killed each other.
    I also wanted guppies because I love bright and colourful fish but they need to be in schools so I was thinking maybe 3 or 4, but here’s the trickiest part I have a 13 gallon tank and I can’t afford a bigger one. If anyone has any guidance on keeping the fish healthy please tell me.

    What should the genders of the gouramis be?
    Do I have space for guppies, and if I do how many could I get?
    Thanks I’m Advance
     
  2. essjay

    essjay Moderator
    Staff Member Moderator Global Moderator

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    Which species of gourami do you want? Many species of gourami are too big for your tank, but some are small enough to be OK.


    However, gouramis are mainly soft water fish (some species need very soft water) while guppies are hard water fish so they are not really compatible. Can you tell us the hardness of your tap water, please. You should be able to find this somewhere on your water provider's website. We need a number and the unit rather than vague words - and we need the unit as are there are around half a dozen different units they could use.

    Once we know how hard your water is, we'll able able to give you a better idea of stocking.



    Since it's been some time since you last had fish, are you aware of the need to cycle the tank before getting fish - this means growing some 'good' bacteria to deal with fish waste. There is a good explanation and method on here https://www.fishforums.net/threads/cycling-your-new-fresh-water-tank-read-this-first.421488/
    The other way to get a tank ready for fish is by putting a good amount of live plants in the tank then waiting until you are sure they are growing well and not about to die, then getting fish. This does mean having more than just the odd one or two live plants.
     
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  3. Róisín

    Róisín New Member

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    Hi, thanks for replying, I forgot to mention that they’re gonna be dwarf gouramis, I’ve been told that our tap water is soft but I have also attached a picture of what’s on my water providers website.
    I am buying some plants very soon to oxygenate the water, but i have got a pump in my tank already. How many plants would you recommend buying?
     

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  4. Byron

    Byron Member

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    That photo does not include levels for GH (general hardness). Is there any other data?

    Leaving aside the water for the moment, I would not recommend Dwarf Gourami. The Honey Gourami would be better for this tank, and you could have a trio of one male and two females.

    For plants, floating are important with gourami (and helpful to most all other fish too). Water Sprite is ideal if you can find some in local stores.
     
  5. Róisín

    Róisín New Member

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    I will look out for the Water Sprite, although I can’t find any other data on my water suppliers’ website, I have been told that the GH of the water is soft. And I might be able to find a trio of honey gourami, would I be able to keep any other fish or do you think that it’s breaching the safe amount?
     
  6. Byron

    Byron Member

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    It is wise to pin down the GH. This will not change much if at all in the aquarium, and some fish do have preferences. You might give the water authority a call and ask for the GH; if you do, make sure you get both the number and their unit of measure (mg/l, degrees German, or whatever). Or you could take a sample (of your tap water) to a reliable fish store for a GH test; again make sure you write down the number and unit. Terms like "soft" or "moderate" are not always accurate because they mean different things to different people. In another thread here some time back, what was said to be "moderately hard" water turned out to be soft to very soft.

    In this tank, a trip of honey gourami are OK. And there are some peaceful shoaling fish that would also be fine, with the gourami and in this tank, subject to the GH being soft. The dwarf rasbora species in Boraras are one option, a group of 9-10 (they are very small). Or the Ember Tetra, same number. One of the dwarf species of cory in a group of 9-10, if you have sand substrate.
     
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  7. Róisín

    Róisín New Member

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    Thanks for your help I will try and find a GH test on my water, and the fish that you’ve suggested do look very nice.
     
  8. Róisín

    Róisín New Member

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    Is there any slightly larger fish that would get on well, just maybe some that are 2 inches and would the guppies definitely be a bad idea?
     
  9. Byron

    Byron Member

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    You do not have the space in this tank for larger fish than the Honey Gourami and the smaller shoaling species already suggested.
     

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