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First gourami.. chasing my fish!

Discussion in 'New to the Hobby Questions and Answers' started by Angeline, Jul 13, 2019 at 8:51 PM.

  1. Angeline

    Angeline New Member

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    I'm not exactly sure what type of Gourami it is I'll include a photo for ID..
    I was told he would be fine in a community tank in the size I have until I size up. He had been attacking my plattyso i moved him theninto buta smaller rankt however the Gourami then went on to attack my baby guppies so I simply removed the gourmi from the tank. I'm looking for advice on whether I should return him or if there's an alternative option. I'm used to community tanks. My female Betta recently died I had her for about 3 years.. not sure how old she was though. I have plenty of little fish in the tank like 5 neon tetras, 2 baby guppies and a platty. I wanted to add a fish that was a little larger as sort of a center piece (best way to phrase it I suppose) the way my girl kirillina was. Was I lied to? Is it a hopeless mix of fish to have in one community?:(
     
  2. Angeline

    Angeline New Member

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  3. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    It's a male platinum gourami, which is a colour form of the 3 spot or blue gourami. They are pretty agro. I would return it because it is bashing everyone and will continue to do so.

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    What are the tank dimensions (length x width x height)?

    What is the GH (general hardness) and pH of your water supply. This information can usually be obtained from your water supply company's website or by telephoning them. If they can't help you, take a glass full of tap water to the local pet shop and get them to test it for you. Write the results down (in numbers) when they do the tests. And ask them what the results are in (eg: ppm, dGH, or something else).

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    Livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies) naturally occur in hard alkaline water with a pH above 7.0 and a GH above 200ppm (GH above 250ppm for mollies).
    Tetras naturally occur in soft water with a pH below 7.0 and a GH below 150ppm.

    If you keep livebearers in soft water they have problems. If you keep tetras in hard water they can have problems.
     
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  4. Angeline

    Angeline New Member

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    It is a 10 gallon I'm picking up a 20 soon. I'm very disappointed however I should have done more research so I guess I can only blame myself. All the levels in the water are fine I have a test kit and check it regularly I'll do it again in the morning and update you. I'm not sure they'll take him back without a receipt but I'm not risking him hurting the other fish. Do you have reccomendations for a fish I could add in its place?
     
  5. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    If you bought the fish in the last few days, take it back to the shop you got it from. They should take it back and give you a store credit that you can use to get something else. Don't get a replacement fish yet.

    I will wait for the GH and pH results before recommending fish.

    If you visit the pet shop and make a list of fish and plants you like, then post that list here, along with the GH and pH, we can advise you on which fish go together and which don't.

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    The water in the picture with the gourami looks milky cloudy. How long have the tanks been set up for?
    How often do you do water changes?
    Do you gravel clean the substrate when you do a water change?
    Do you dechlorinate the new water before adding it to the tank?

    What sort of filter do you have?
    How often do you clean the filter and how do you clean it?
     
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  6. Angeline

    Angeline New Member

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    As of now my levels are at(I'm also due for a water change):
    GH-60
    KH-0
    PH-7
    NO2-3
    NO3-80


    Here are plants I have in my tank I've had one for about 3 months and the smaller one for like a month or so they seem to be fairing well. 20190714_134634.jpg 20190714_134732.jpg
     
  7. Angeline

    Angeline New Member

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  8. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for the next week. This will dilute the nitrite (NO2) and nitrate (NO3).

    You need ammonia and nitrite on 0ppm at all times, and nitrate as low as possible and below 20ppm at all times. If you get any readings above these, do a big water change to dilute it.
    Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

    Ammonia and nitrite issues are directly linked to the filter.
    What sort of filter do you have and how do you clean it?

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    I'm assuming the GH is 60ppm, in which case the water is very soft and suitable to tetras, barbs and small peaceful gouramis (honey, sparkling, Indian banded). However, avoid dwarf gouramis (Trichogaster lalius) and all their colour forms because they are riddled with diseases that can't be cured.

    Most barbs will be too active for the small tank. Is there any chance you can get a tank that is bigger than a 20 gallon? Tanks that are 3 foot long or bigger, let you keep a wider range of fishes.
     
  9. Angeline

    Angeline New Member

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    I'll pick up some supplies for the gravel cleaning tomorrow and have it done. I just got a new filter I'll include a photo. I've only had it in for a week or so I did a small water change when I put it in. How would you reccomend cleaning it? 20190714_235645.jpg I'm not too worried about the Gourami I know a few places that would gladly take him since I'm pretty set on a 20 gallon (I don't want to bite off more than I can chew). I also forgot to mention the little ones I have in there - 2 ghost shrimp, 1 cherry shrimp, a golden Inca snail (I think) and mystery snail (also a guess). Would that effect where the levels should be? Maybe you can reccomend something to add or remove so that they are all healthier..
     
  10. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    See if you can find sponges that fit in the filter instead of using the filter pads. You can buy bigger sponges and use a pair of scissors to cut the sponge to fit in the filter. Sponges can then be squeezed out in a bucket of tank water.

    Established filters should be cleaned at least once a month and every 2 weeks is better. However, do not clean the filter during the first 6 weeks unless the flow rate slows down. If you clean a new filter you can remove the beneficial filter bacteria and it will take long for the filter to cycle.

    Reduce feeding to a couple of times a week and do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate 4-8 hours after feeding. Monitor the ammonia and nitrite levels and do a 75% water change any day you have a reading above 0.

    When the filter has established and you no longer get an ammonia or nitrite reading, you can increase feeding to every day and do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate once a week.
    Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.
     

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