Anubias rotting roots

Divinityinlove

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This anubias arrived with unexpectedly long roots, quite thick and instead of cutting them and gluing it to a rock, I just buried the lengthy parts and as you can see left crown and plenty of root above gravel, held down by stones.

I did notice last week when some of the longer roots came out as I gravel vacuumed, that they were partially rotten....

What is the best fix for this? Should I pull all roots out, cut off rotten bits and glue the short roots to the rocks, or will it adapt to having part of its roots under gravel?

Very much appreciate your insights.
IMG_20221121_134521.jpg
 

Archerfish

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Yes, you don't want to plant Anubias in the substrate. Anubias is best attached to a log or rock with the roots exposed. Use cotton thread to attach it. I wouldn't cut off any healthy roots. Dead or 'gooey' roots should be removed with sharp scissors before attaching the plant to a log.
 

BrianK

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I trim the roots all the time on my Anubias (all the really long ones). I do always leave about an inch or two. The roots on an Anubias are just to anchor the plant. They do most of their feeding through the leaves.
 

StevenF

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The roots can be curries in the substrate the the rizom must not be burried. The Rhizome is the part the the leaves and roots are attached to. But the bigger issue you have is that all your plants look sick. A lot of yellow leaves. are you using a fertilizer?
 
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Divinityinlove

Divinityinlove

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The roots can be curries in the substrate the the rizom must not be burried. The Rhizome is the part the the leaves and roots are attached to. But the bigger issue you have is that all your plants look sick. A lot of yellow leaves. are you using a fertilizer?
I am. I use TNC lite. However it is well established from many posts of mine here that my water is an issue and I don't have an RO system and also everyone suggests finding a custom combo of ferts to help which requires figuring out what my water needs, and also trial and error or making my own and I am no chemistry expert so I have yet to figure out what to do. The same plants do well in my main tank... Not sure if they dislike the water temp at 22°C? My main tank is 26°C. Other than this, my other tank is older so maybe more established. I have no idea why they aren't flourishing yet.
 

Byron

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From your post above, I am more inclined to think the light may be a factor. What type, what is the spectrum, and how long is it on? You are in London with hard water so the TNC Lite is fine. I also see that the older leaves are the ones yellowing, and looks like algae (diatoms?), so all does not look that bad, given your information so far. Do not jump into adding more nutrients, this is not likely the issue here.
 

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