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The best way to vanish from the planet without anyone knowing, if you are a fish species, is to:
a) be close to a vibrant economy with an expanding human population;
b) be small and harmless;
c) not be worth money;
d) not be edible.

At that point, people are too busy trying to pay their rent or get by (or building over habitats and checking their stocks if they're rich) to even notice you were there in the first place. It's suspected that swamp drainage projects have made a few species of Bettas extinct before they were even noticed. That pattern is repeated on every continent.
I see. What if zoos and public aquaria from British Columbia kept WCM minnows for conservation purposes? With the help of hobbyists not from the area and scientists, it could happen, but I don't know if it will nowadays.
 
White Clouds are native to Hong Kong. not to British Colombia. In BC, they don't want them getting into waterways because they could become invasives.

I have friends who worked with the Vancouver Aquarium, and they do good conservation work. What possible reason would a Canadian aquarium have for maintaining a Hong Kong fish, when there are many fish endangered close to the institutions? The idea is to protect native fish by keeping it out of the environment.

In the family that contains white clouds, dozens of species have gone extinct since 2000.

The point is, they are lovely aquarium fish, so we notice they're missing. What species coexisted with them in Hong Kong - ones that may have been less attractive?
 
White Clouds are native to Hong Kong. not to British Colombia. In BC, they don't want them getting into waterways because they could become invasives.

I have friends who worked with the Vancouver Aquarium, and they do good conservation work. What possible reason would a Canadian aquarium have for maintaining a Hong Kong fish, when there are many fish endangered close to the institutions? The idea is to protect native fish by keeping it out of the environment.

In the family that contains white clouds, dozens of species have gone extinct since 2000.

The point is, they are lovely aquarium fish, so we notice they're missing. What species coexisted with them in Hong Kong - ones that may have been less attractive?
Oh, White Cloud Mountain's in China, not Hong Kong, but I understand on what you're talking about. They're extinct in the wild from their original range, and there could be conservation efforts for these fish, while keeping them out of the British Columbia environment at the same time. Keeping them in public aquaria in controlled, escape proof tanks could work. I respect your opinions on WCM minnows however. I understand that they're pests in the area. WCM minnows have intrigued people and that could result in the release of these fish into native waterways.

Many people are familiar with the fish because it was called the 'poor man's neon tetra' in the 1950s-60s because neons were expensive during the time. And we do understand that. They cost $2ea in my LFS. Very cheap. People like WCM minnows because of their hardiness. However aquarists should not release these fish in the wild elsewhere outside their native range.
 
Oh, and @GaryE, people do have different feelings about WCM minnows and I understand the very risks about them in the BC area of Canada. I'm from Australia, not Canada, but I am aware about this issue. I first heard of it recently and dozens of native fish species have gone extinct since 2000 because of them? Ouch. I didn't know the effects on the release of WCM minnows in BC until now. I heard that WCM minnows are a pest in NSW, but not in other Australian states.
 
Today's Friday. The school holidays have come. It's Easter in a few days time. Dad can't go to Queensland because he has a sore back. Mum and my younger sister won't arrive back to Perth until April 4. Focusing on the stocking of two aquarium projects, but I have to choose first. Bigger's better at least. The thing about the tank size is that it's better to go big rather than smaller aquaria to start with. I picked the latter as a beginner and made a mistake. At least Petworx and Aqua One make good glass aquaria in various sizes. It's customisable and you could do a Walstad method in the tank, but it's hard to perfect overtime. I trust Petworx and probably Aqua One because they make good aquariums compared to the US brand Aqueon in my opinion.
 
Going on the stepping stones of getting a larger aquarium. I was originally going for a nano community tank, but I have decided to put my three remaining year old cardinals and new cardinals into the 121.5L tank. They deserve a bigger home instead of the mistake-ridden 10 gallon tall tank. I will sell the silvertips, move the cardinals from the old tank to the new one and shut down the 10 gallon tank for good, unless I could turn it into a betta tank. Double the length, more swimming space and more suitable tankmates in the 121.5L tank would make it a more pleasurable experience for my cardinals. I love my cardinal tetras dearly, but I regret getting the silvertips a year ago.
 
Everyday I learn something new. Takes some time and effort to look after a planted tank. What are the best beginner aquarium plants to start with?
 
Everyday I learn something new. Takes some time and effort to look after a planted tank. What are the best beginner aquarium plants to start with?
LIST OF PLANTS TO TRY
Some good plants to try include Ambulia, Hygrophila polysperma, H. ruba/ rubra, Elodia (during summer, but don't buy it in winter because it falls apart), Hydrilla, common Amazon sword plant, narrow or twisted/ spiral Vallis, Water Sprite (Ceratopteris thalictroides/ cornuta).

The Water Sprite normally floats on the surface but can also be planted in the substrate. The other plants should be planted in the gravel.

Ambulia, H. polysperma, Elodia/ Hydrilla and Vallis are tall plants that do well along the back. Rotala macranda is a medium/ tallish red plant that usually does well.

H. ruba/ rubra is a medium height plant that looks good on the sides of the tank.

Cryptocorynes are small/ medium plants that are taller than pygmy chain swords but shorter than H. rubra. They also come in a range of colours, mostly different shades of green, brown or purplish red. Crypts are not the easiest plant to grow but can do well if they are healthy to begin with and are not disturbed after planting in the tank.

Most Amazon sword plants can get pretty big and are usually kept in the middle of the tank as a show piece. There is an Ozelot sword plant that has brown spots on green leaves, and a red ruffle sword plant (name may vary depending on where you live) with deep red leaves.

There is a pygmy chain sword plant that is small and does well in the front of the tank.
 
LIST OF PLANTS TO TRY
Some good plants to try include Ambulia, Hygrophila polysperma, H. ruba/ rubra, Elodia (during summer, but don't buy it in winter because it falls apart), Hydrilla, common Amazon sword plant, narrow or twisted/ spiral Vallis, Water Sprite (Ceratopteris thalictroides/ cornuta).

The Water Sprite normally floats on the surface but can also be planted in the substrate. The other plants should be planted in the gravel.

Ambulia, H. polysperma, Elodia/ Hydrilla and Vallis are tall plants that do well along the back. Rotala macranda is a medium/ tallish red plant that usually does well.

H. ruba/ rubra is a medium height plant that looks good on the sides of the tank.

Cryptocorynes are small/ medium plants that are taller than pygmy chain swords but shorter than H. rubra. They also come in a range of colours, mostly different shades of green, brown or purplish red. Crypts are not the easiest plant to grow but can do well if they are healthy to begin with and are not disturbed after planting in the tank.

Most Amazon sword plants can get pretty big and are usually kept in the middle of the tank as a show piece. There is an Ozelot sword plant that has brown spots on green leaves, and a red ruffle sword plant (name may vary depending on where you live) with deep red leaves.

There is a pygmy chain sword plant that is small and does well in the front of the tank.
That's a great list @Colin_T. Have you heard about Crypt. nurii before? They have tiger striped leaves, which is a beautiful sight for the crypt. genus. Is it a species or is it just a cultivar of the wenditii crypt?
 
It's Saturday. Found some nice tanks from FB marketplace, including a 91 x 46 x 53cm (221L) Petworx aquarium costing $200. It's nicer than fish tanks (undersized for goldfish etc.) shown in the American locations. But I choose the 60 x 45 x 45cm starfire Petworx glass aquarium (121.5L, 32 US gallons) instead so it's easier and less heavy than the 220L aquarium. But bigger means better water quality and more fish. I just have to wait until Mum and the younger sister comes home from QLD first.
 
I know it can be hard when it comes to live plants for the beginner fishkeeper. It can be hard looking after live plants in a big aquarium, but once I get the hold of it, it could look pretty. Plant scissors, tweezers and other essential tools are all I need for a nice planted aquarium. I will get the hold of it over time. I'm cycling the tank longer this time. The last time I cycled my old aquarium was a week and a bit. I plan to do two-three weeks of cycling and test the water regularly.
 
I know it can be hard when it comes to live plants for the beginner fishkeeper. It can be hard looking after live plants in a big aquarium, but once I get the hold of it, it could look pretty. Plant scissors, tweezers and other essential tools are all I need for a nice planted aquarium. I will get the hold of it over time. I'm cycling the tank longer this time. The last time I cycled my old aquarium was a week and a bit. I plan to do two-three weeks of cycling and test the water regularly.
You don't need any of that to grow plants in an aquarium. They are gimmicks sold by shops to take your money. Any pair of scissors that are sharp can be used to trim plants. Tweezers crush the stems of aquatic plants. Tongs are no use unless the plant is massive and has a decent sized stem and root ball. Even then using your hand is better for the plant.

What you need to grow aquatic plants is water, gravel or sand substrate, aquarium plant fertiliser and light.

Don't get sucked in by the crap shops sell, most of it isn't necessary. You can buy the latest greatest most fancy stuff around but it won't help you keep fish or plants any more than basic gear.
 

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