Tank Setup Feedback

cupofjoel

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I'm trying to set up a new nano-tank that has no filter. Here is my plan and please let me know since I've never done this before:

-Tank capacity (7 gallons)
-One male Betta
-around 5 pots worth of Anubias Nana Petite
-the surface covered in floating plants

Would this be enough to keep the betta healthy in terms of water parameters? I've heard that there would be enough good bacteria in the substrate and decor, and the floating plants would act as an added benefit in a variety of ways. I'll do weekly water changes and feed minimally as well.

Thoughts?

My thinking is that a filter is basically good for water polishing/mechanical filtration.
 

Naughts

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According to the care sheet it is possible to keep betta splendens in an unfiltered tank if you do 100% water changes. Would the tank be heated?
 
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cupofjoel

cupofjoel

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According to the care sheet it is possible to keep betta splendens in an unfiltered tank if you do 100% water changes. Would the tank be heated?
The tank would not have a heater. The room that it would be in is around 74-75 consistently so there would be no need for a water heater. And 100% water changes? I was thinking more like 60-70% weekly.
 

PheonixKingZ

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This is a widely controversial subject...

Yes, it is possible but it requires a lot of plants/work.

Why questions to people trying to have this setup is always the same - Why not just get a filter? They are really cheap, and a much better option IMO.
 
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cupofjoel

cupofjoel

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This is a widely controversial subject...

Yes, it is possible but it requires a lot of plants/work.

Why questions to people trying to have this setup is always the same - Why not just get a filter? They are really cheap, and a much better option IMO.
I have nothing against getting a filter. It's just one more thing I need to service when I might not have the time to service it when it needs to. This tank would be my 3rd tank in the house and I want it as low maintenance as possible.
 

PheonixKingZ

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I have nothing against getting a filter. It's just one more thing I need to service when I might not have the time to service it when it needs to. This tank would be my 3rd tank in the house and I want it as low maintenance as possible.
@Byron can explain this better, and he is online now.

Sponge filters are very low maintenance, that’s always an option.
 

seangee

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The BB require two ingreadients (besides ammonia) to thrive. These are oxygen and water movement. You should have something to circulate the water, even if its a super low powered pump or air pump. No big deal if it fails because the tank won't crash but you do need some water movement.
 
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cupofjoel

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It seems I can't get away from adding some type of filter/water movement. I'll abandon the idea then. Thanks everyone!
 

PheonixKingZ

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It seems I can't get away from adding some type of filter/water movement. I'll abandon the idea then. Thanks everyone!
Sounds good. Although the plant-only method may seem like a cool idea, it usually doesn’t work out.
 

AbbeysDad

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This is a widely controversial subject...

Yes, it is possible but it requires a lot of plants/work.

Why questions to people trying to have this setup is always the same - Why not just get a filter? They are really cheap, and a much better option IMO.
Although filters help clarify water by trapping particulates, without advanced chemical filtration to adsorb impurities, they do nothing to purify water. For better water quality, we need plants to use nutrients (aka pollution) and routine partial water changes. A single fish in a 7g tank with fast growing floating plants, 50% weekly should work fine. Without a filter, may want an air stone to provide surface agitation for CO2/O2 exchange.
 

PheonixKingZ

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Although filters help clarify water by trapping particulates, without advanced chemical filtration to adsorb impurities, they do nothing to purify water. For better water quality, we need plants to use nutrients (aka pollution) and routine partial water changes. A single fish in a 7g tank with fast growing floating plants, 50% weekly should work fine. Without a filter, may want an air stone to provide surface agitation for CO2/O2 exchange.
Yes... filters keep the water clear, not clean. As you said, daily water changes will help.

But, a filter is a much better option, as he wanted it low maintenance. Doing a water change every day is a lot of work, especially if you have 2 other tanks.
 

JuiceBox52

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Yes... filters keep the water clear, not clean. As you said, daily water changes will help.

But, a filter is a much better option, as he wanted it low maintenance. Doing a water change every day is a lot of work, especially if you have 2 other tanks.
No need to do daily water changes...weekly is fine
 

AbbeysDad

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Yes... filters keep the water clear, not clean. As you said, daily water changes will help.

But, a filter is a much better option, as he wanted it low maintenance. Doing a water change every day is a lot of work, especially if you have 2 other tanks.
I suggested 50% WEEKLY and if you read the blog post, filters only make water clearer, NOT cleaner.
 

Byron

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I ran a 10g tank for a year with no filter, no light, just the heater (cold winters here demand heaters). It was an experiment, using natural daylight (in front of a west facing window) and no filter just plants. I had a group of 11 Boraras brigittae and 9 Corydoras pygmaeus. Lots of snails. Weekly 60% water change.

I didn't like the idea, not for any noticeable issue with the fish, but because back lighting is not good for viewing the fish, and the plants naturally grow toward the light (back), and daylight is much more difficult to control than tank lighting so algae on the back wall was an issue. And the water never looked crystal clear compared to the other tanks in the fish room. I moved the tank away from the window, added a sponge filter and a normal overhead light unit.

A Betta should not have oxygen issues in a 10g with plants. My experiment was a number of years ago now and I don't think I even thought of the diurnal CO2 issue. I do know I can see the effect on fish in my tanks with higher fish and plant numbers if surface water disturbance is not sufficient during the night. I have sponge filters in my smaller (under 30 gallon) tanks and I rinse them under the tap at each water change (once weekly) so this is low maintenance as it only takes maybe four or five minutes more.
 
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